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seyedmusawi

Wearing Islamic dress

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(bismillah)

(salam)

With the ever increasing onslaught of western culture we see more and more people dressing, thinking, and acting in a western manner. Even a villager in pakistan, afghanistan, or iran watches television and wishes to dress and act like the people do in the west. With this context in mind should muslim men begin dressing as muslims to solidify there identity and fight against the ever spreading western culture. We know that what we wear affects our state of mind. If we wear "sharp" clothing we feel sharp and wealthy. We are in effect what we wear. We judge ourselves in the looking glass of how others perceive us. So if we wear a suit which is a trademark of the kufar then do we become more-so like the kufar?

When there are solid hadiths that tell us not to dress like the kufar...is the wearing of western clothing haraam? And is the wearing of islamic clothing wajib?

Will imam mahdi come to us in a dishdashe or will he come wearing a suit??

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(bismillah) (salam)

Wow, excellent topic...

I agree with you to a certain extent. I think alot of it depends on where you are living. We live in the US (where I'm from), so I tend to (usually) wear Western clothing that is Islamically acceptable - a loose sleeveless dress over a longsleeved shirt, etc. My husband occasionally (hardly ever) wears a suit jacket, but no tie (ever), and he usually wears loose jeans and loose shirts (often longsleeved, tee-shirts in summer). He also wears muted colors (as do I) - blues, greys, dark greens...

I think in our case we (especially I lol) stand out enough as it is without putting neon signs over our heads (flashing *MUSLIMS* *MUSLIMS* *MUSLIMS* lol). Our neighbors are Muslim, and I believe there are two other Muslim families in the city we live in - pop. 24,000 plus. Personally I would LOVE to wear chador and see my husband in a thobe and matching pants (I've seen him in that in a pic :wub: ), but here it would be considered "dress of fame" (I don't remember the Islamic term for it), so it actually would not be good for us to do.

Insh'Allah some day, we'll live in a more tolerant (preferably Islamic, insh'Allah) society, and I'll be buying chador the instant we get there.

Sorry if I rambled a bit, I'm really tired :squeez:

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(salam)

What about Western Muslims? Aren't they entitled to keep the halaal parts of their culture, including dress? We've made this too much into a "West/Atheism vs East/Islam" thing. That's hardly the case, especially with many predominantly Islamic countries in Europe and Western converts on the rise. Islam encompasses both East and West, one type of clothing is not better than the other (unless one is revealing and the other isn't.) I don't think the notion of Islamic dress is a correct one, though certainly the notion of modest dress is. I'm a Sunni Muslim however, so possibly Shia Imams have said something concerning this that I am not aware of.

Edited by mabus

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(bismillah)

(salam)

Well brother i dont' see the clothes as a problem in themselves...they are clothes. But i fear what they represent. When a pakistani or irani youngster in some village begins dressing in jeans and trying to imitate western culture i have to ask why.

Does he feel inferior? Does he feel western culture is higher than his own so he must dress like them? If people are doing this out of a feeling of cultural inferiority (which i feel they are) then that is a very dangerous thing.

For example iran had a distinct dress very much like what afghans, pakistani/indians wear today. They changed the dress when the british came and took over the country. So we changed our clothing due to imperialism and bullying not because we "liked" the clothing.

To sister AnonyMuslima:

Perhaps the first step is wearing the clothes at home? Then a few times outside...who knows. The trendsetters always have it hard but eventually once it Becomes a trend then its much easier for everyone. The sikhs wear there clothing, turbans, and beards without problem or shame...perhaps we should have the same attitude?

Inshallah Allah will protect us from anything that takes us away from him.

Ameen..alhamdullilahe rabel alameen.

Edited by seyedmusawi

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well the simple fact is some "islamic clothing" isnt condusive to all walks of life. for example, when fighting, a robe isnt very condusive to the movement one has to do on the battle field, so we would be saying for soldiers to risk their lives needlessly just to keep Islamic dress. the simple fact is western BDU's (batle dress uniforms, the camo stuff) are much more suited to that environment. I look at these idiots who are fighting In Iraq and think "they probably wouldnt be killed so quickly if they would take off the robe and put on some pants, be able to move out of the way of fire without tripping" but since most of them hate shia, hey... keep the robes boys!

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(bismillah)

(salam)

In war the prophet did not wear a robe...he wore the battle dress they had which was chain armor with form fighting clothing.

Also the fighters in iraq wear those clothes to blend in..if they need to bail. If they were wearing standard issues then they would be caught and killed much more easily than if they just melted into the populace.

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inshallah when applicable we will also wear the dress for war.

however, islam is not confined to culture. islam isn't governed by culture.

We should understand that clothing makes a statement.

Why is it that some musics are not allowed in islam? sometimes it is because of the places that it is presented.

The same applies to clothing. If there are some clothes that are acustom for some settings and those settings aren't permissible for a muslim we shouldn't be wearing such clothing.

However im sure there are also many ways to wear that same robe to make it unislamic.

But to wrap it up, i know for a fact there is an islamic way to do everything, that includes wearing "western clothing"

fee aman Allah

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To sister AnonyMuslima:

Perhaps the first step is wearing the clothes at home? Then a few times outside...who knows. The trendsetters always have it hard but eventually once it Becomes a trend then its much easier for everyone. The sikhs wear there clothing, turbans, and beards without problem or shame...perhaps we should have the same attitude?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Well, as I said, we live in the West, in the midwest of the U.S., to be more specific. We are one of only four Muslim couples in a city of over 24,000 people. Wearing chador will not start a trend, it will cause unwanted (and most likely unwelcome) attention - hence the reference to "dress of fame," which negates any positive aspects of wearing chador.

I used to work in a public business and several times had very rude people, complete strangers, come up to me (I was wearing a khimar and a loose jilbab at the time) and make incredibly rude and hurtful remarks right to my face, about myself, my faith and my husband (who wasn't even there!). Subhan'Allah, I left that place and will never put myself in such a situation again, insh'Allah.

As a Muslim woman, I dress with modesty, covering all but my face and hands, and disguising the shape of my figure (& wearing no makeup or jewelry other than the occasional ring), and following Sistani's rulings, any clothing which fits that description is ISLAMIC, no matter what culture it comes from. A thobe is Arabic, and so is a jilbab; I'm not an Arab :P although I do like jilbabs very much. I have five or six of them, and I usually choose a jilbab over another type of dress for everything from trips to the store to visiting family and friends. I just don't wear the black chador over them.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not arguing with what you said, but there is a time and a place for everything, and Middle Eastern clothing is not appropriate in every circumstance, especially when you're severely outnumbered by people who believe whatever the media tells them about the Middle East as well as about Islam, and won't hesitate to "put you in your place," right out in public. I can be appropriately modest, following the Shariah, but I don't have to invite ridicule and scorn (not to mention possible injury) from ignorant people who have no idea what they're talking about. Right? :)

Oh, and btw - I don't wear jilbabs at home unless we have company. I wear what I like in the privacy of our home, because I want to be comfortable, and also because it's one thing (a very good thing) to cover in front of strangers - it's quite another to cover in front of your husband. I'm the one woman he doesn't have to lower his gaze to, so I don't do that :P

Edited by AnonyMuslima

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(bismillah)

(salam)

(bismillah)

(salam)

With the ever increasing onslaught of western culture we see more and more people dressing, thinking, and acting in a western manner. Even a villager in pakistan, afghanistan, or iran watches television and wishes to dress and act like the people do in the west. With this context in mind should muslim men begin dressing as muslims to solidify there identity and fight against the ever spreading western culture. We know that what we wear affects our state of mind. If we wear "sharp" clothing we feel sharp and wealthy. We are in effect what we wear. We judge ourselves in the looking glass of how others perceive us. So if we wear a suit which is a trademark of the kufar then do we become more-so like the kufar?

When there are solid hadiths that tell us not to dress like the kufar...is the wearing of western clothing haraam? And is the wearing of islamic clothing wajib?

Will imam mahdi come to us in a dishdashe or will he come wearing a suit??

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

(salam)

What about Western Muslims? Aren't they entitled to keep the halaal parts of their culture, including dress? We've made this too much into a "West/Atheism vs East/Islam" thing. That's hardly the case, especially with many predominantly Islamic countries in Europe and Western converts on the rise. Islam encompasses both East and West, one type of clothing is not better than the other (unless one is revealing and the other isn't.) I don't think the notion of Islamic dress is a correct one, though certainly the notion of modest dress is. I'm a Sunni Muslim however, so possibly Shia Imams have said something concerning this that I am not aware of.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

(bismillah)

(salam)

Well brother i dont' see the clothes as a problem in themselves...they are clothes. But i fear what they represent. When a pakistani or irani youngster in some village begins dressing in jeans and trying to imitate western culture i have to ask why.

Does he feel inferior? Does he feel western culture is higher than his own so he must dress like them? If people are doing this out of a feeling of cultural inferiority (which i feel they are) then that is a very dangerous thing.

For example iran had a distinct dress very much like what afghans, pakistani/indians wear today. They changed the dress when the british came and took over the country. So we changed our clothing due to imperialism and bullying not because we "liked" the clothing.

To sister AnonyMuslima:

Perhaps the first step is wearing the clothes at home? Then a few times outside...who knows. The trendsetters always have it hard but eventually once it Becomes a trend then its much easier for everyone. The sikhs wear there clothing, turbans, and beards without problem or shame...perhaps we should have the same attitude?

Inshallah Allah will protect us from anything that takes us away from him.

Ameen..alhamdullilahe rabel alameen.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

What's your point?

You don't seem to be clear on what you want to say or ask?

How did the kuffar dress, when it was enjoined not to dress like them?

Apart from the dress being non-revealing and modest, is there any other prescription?

قَد قُتل الحسينُ بکربلا

اُجڑ گئ ہاۓ ثانیِ زاہرا وچ کربل دے واويلا

----

نقشِ الا لله بر صحرا نوشت -- سطرِ عنوانِ نجات ِما نوشت

ا ے صبا، اے پیکِ دورافتادگاں -- سلامِ ما بخاکِ پاکِ او رسا

اقبال

Please check links below

(salam)

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1.there is no such thing as Islamic dress code (only modesty is)

2.Islam came to Arabia first thats why Prophet(sa) and companions used to dress the way ppl of that time used to dress....Prophet(sa) didnot bring a new islamic dress...he used to wear the same dress as kuffar of that time..robe etc

3.So if u are in america u shud dress the way they dress(ofcourse modesty shud be practiced)

4.Dresses reflect the geography of a place. u cant wear a cotton robe in North Pole.

5.Imam Mahdi(as) will were the dress according to the conditions of the place where ever he live.

This is a stupid thread :squeez:

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(bismillah)

(salam)

I understand your position sister and totally agree with it.

For me its wanting to be what the prophet was moreso than anything else. I was reading some of the ulemas opinions on wearing for example the aba (the outer cover the ulema wear) during prayer. They consider these things mustahab during salat.

Now i had to ask myself why would a piece of cloth be mustahab for prayer if it was simply cultural. The conclusion i got was that what the prophet of islam wore automatically became mustahab...just because he wore it. So there is spiritual benefit from emulating the prophet..from what he said...to how he said it...to what he wore.

I remember one story where a man brought imam ali a sweet desert and imam refused it. The man asked him if it was haram to eat? Imam replied that no...it was halal but since the prophet did not like to eat this specific desert he also did not wish to eat it. From this i gleaned that we must attempt to emulate the prophet as much as possible for everything he did had a reason and a blessing behind it. So wearing clothing similar to what he wore is most probably better for us as muslims than wearing western clothes which are the hallmark of decadance and materialism. The niyyat is perhaps 90% of this.

Anyways this post was more directed toward the brothers because the sisters are already doing a great job wearing the hijab. Here in the west that is enough. Perhaps the brothers could keep up inshallah. :)

Eltemase dua,

Assalamo allaikum

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(bismillah)

(salam)

I understand your position sister and totally agree with it.

For me its wanting to be what the prophet was moreso than anything else. I was reading some of the ulemas opinions on wearing for example the aba (the outer cover the ulema wear) during prayer. They consider these things mustahab during salat.

Now i had to ask myself why would a piece of cloth be mustahab for prayer if it was simply cultural. The conclusion i got was that what the prophet of islam wore automatically became mustahab...just because he wore it. So there is spiritual benefit from emulating the prophet..from what he said...to how he said it...to what he wore.

I remember one story where a man brought imam ali a sweet desert and imam refused it. The man asked him if it was haram to eat? Imam replied that no...it was halal but since the prophet did not like to eat this specific desert he also did not wish to eat it. From this i gleaned that we must attempt to emulate the prophet as much as possible for everything he did had a reason and a blessing behind it. So wearing clothing similar to what he wore is most probably better for us as muslims than wearing western clothes which are the hallmark of decadance and materialism. The niyyat is perhaps 90% of this.

Anyways this post was more directed toward the brothers because the sisters are already doing a great job wearing the hijab. Here in the west that is enough. Perhaps the brothers could keep up inshallah. :)

Eltemase dua,

Assalamo allaikum

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

only if U want to emulate...if u dont want to u are not BOUND...thas wat i say..and thas the point of the thread

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(bismillah)

(salam)

(bismillah)

(salam)

I understand your position sister and totally agree with it.

For me its wanting to be what the prophet was moreso than anything else. I was reading some of the ulemas opinions on wearing for example the aba (the outer cover the ulema wear) during prayer. They consider these things mustahab during salat.

Now i had to ask myself why would a piece of cloth be mustahab for prayer if it was simply cultural. The conclusion i got was that what the prophet of islam wore automatically became mustahab...just because he wore it. So there is spiritual benefit from emulating the prophet..from what he said...to how he said it...to what he wore.

I remember one story where a man brought imam ali a sweet desert and imam refused it. The man asked him if it was haram to eat? Imam replied that no...it was halal but since the prophet did not like to eat this specific desert he also did not wish to eat it. From this i gleaned that we must attempt to emulate the prophet as much as possible for everything he did had a reason and a blessing behind it. So wearing clothing similar to what he wore is most probably better for us as muslims than wearing western clothes which are the hallmark of decadance and materialism. The niyyat is perhaps 90% of this.

Anyways this post was more directed toward the brothers because the sisters are already doing a great job wearing the hijab. Here in the west that is enough. Perhaps the brothers could keep up inshallah. :)

Eltemase dua,

Assalamo allaikum

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

What would be your position on this:

Your grandson come across and climb onto your back while you are praying . . .?

. . . and what will be the fate of that particular namaaz?

قَد قُتل الحسينُ بکربلا

اُجڑ گئ ہاۓ ثانیِ زاہرا وچ کربل دے واويلا

----

نقشِ الا لله بر صحرا نوشت -- سطرِ عنوانِ نجات ِما نوشت

ا ے صبا، اے پیکِ دورافتادگاں -- سلامِ ما بخاکِ پاکِ او رسا

اقبال

Please check links below

(salam)

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Well, just a side note before this thread goes south... lol... as far as "decadence" in Western clothing, I get almost all of my Western clothes from Goodwill or the Salvation Army :P

As for my husband, as I said he dresses in loose (but not sloppy-loose) clothing in muted solid colors; he also wears long pants all summer unless it's REALLY hot, then he might wear knee-length shorts, but rarely outdoors. He never goes out in less than a short-sleeved shirt (no sleeveles or going shirtless lol), wears no gold (no jewelry at all other than Islamic rings), and keeps his hair and beard neatly trimmed. :wub: I'd be interested to see what other brothers wear.

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(bismillah)

(salam)

Well brother i dont' see the clothes as a problem in themselves...they are clothes. But i fear what they represent. When a pakistani or irani youngster in some village begins dressing in jeans and trying to imitate western culture i have to ask why.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

(salam)

I agree on that brother, however, that is then an issue of nationalism and culture, not one of religion. Hindus in India are doing the same thing, as are many people around the world. This is a case of cultural inferiority, not religious inferiority.

Also, as for what I wear, in the United States I wear pants that completely cover my legs, never shorts. The most revealing thing I ever put on my body is a shirt, and often that is covered with a sweater during the winter. I can't do it often though, because I live in California and it's sunshine and singing all year round. :(

Whenever we go to some Desi cultural gathering (usually an Urdu mushaira) I wear shalwar kameez. Everyone else wears Western clothing, so I feel a bit weird, even my friends think wearing the shalwar kameez is weird, however, it is one of the few occasions I can show my cultural pride, so I do so.

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(bismillah)

(salam)

Mashallah thats great...where do you live in california btw?

I'm in san diego.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I'm visiting San Diego in about a week. Can you tell me about the shi'a masjids there and the "sight-seeing" places there?

okay, sorry, off topic.... but yeah, if you could help me out, i'd be ze most grateful.

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Great topic. I have often also discussed this with my friends.

For example iran had a distinct dress very much like what afghans, pakistani/indians wear today. They changed the dress when the british came and took over the country. So we changed our clothing due to imperialism and bullying not because we "liked" the clothing.

Are you saying not even a single person in Iran (the Farsi speakers, not Kurds and Baluch) has preserved the native costume? Even in South Asia, where we were colonized (mentally and physically) by the British, shalwar kameez, sari, and sherwani still exist.

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Native clothings, attires, whatever are old news and we should get over them. BEHOLD, THE KKK attire alongwith those in the hood are the worthy ones to be won, even our scholars should done them, like Ahmednijiad does it for example!

Marg ber amrekkka, but we'll wear your clothes :!!!:

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(bismillah)

(salam)

No...none of the city dwelling iranians have preserved there traditional clothing. Way out in the villages of the kurds...baluchs...lors...they do have the traditional clothing. Even those are dying out though. I fear the same for other countries.

Iranians see the suit as there traditional dress although they see the tie as western...:)

Edited by seyedmusawi

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