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In the Name of God بسم الله

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Haji 2003

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We need Saudi-style haram police in the atabat. Enough of the bloodcurdling cringe has been allowed to go on for too long. 

Individual expressions of love for the infallibles is fine, but strobe lights flashing, giant speakers on trucks blasting the shrine-cities with eardrum-shredding music, semi-naked men in mixed gatherings beating themselves unconscious as if in a drug induced frenzy, lumpen youth dancing like drunk rioters in some borderland tavern, is this a pilgrimage or a rave party? And this cringe flooding the shrine-cities every year? All in the name of 'latm'/ 'shoor'/ 'nohe-khwani'? 

We don't need thuggish bullies like the mutawwiyeen, but some sort of supervision is badly needed. Just to kick all these miscreants out. I hear the management at the Abbasiyah shrine kicked them out this year. Commendable step. Purge the shrine-cities. 

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8 hours ago, Shian e Ali said:

Reminds me of how I once met a woman named Akhtar and I wondered why she didn’t marry a man named Akhtar. It was the perfect opportunity to be named Akhtar Akhtar after marriage, and perhaps have their kids named Akhtar too. 

Imagine if they were both Actors too. Akhtar Akhtar the Actor 

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On 1/18/2024 at 7:00 PM, AbdusSibtayn said:

We need Saudi-style haram police in the atabat. Enough of the bloodcurdling cringe has been allowed to go on for too long. 

Individual expressions of love for the infallibles is fine, but strobe lights flashing, giant speakers on trucks blasting the shrine-cities with eardrum-shredding music, semi-naked men in mixed gatherings beating themselves unconscious as if in a drug induced frenzy, lumpen youth dancing like drunk rioters in some borderland tavern, is this a pilgrimage or a rave party? And this cringe flooding the shrine-cities every year? All in the name of 'latm'/ 'shoor'/ 'nohe-khwani'? 

We don't need thuggish bullies like the mutawwiyeen, but some sort of supervision is badly needed. Just to kick all these miscreants out. I hear the management at the Abbasiyah shrine kicked them out this year. Commendable step. Purge the shrine-cities. 

Something I've been against for a long time but I don't see it ending anytime soon until the top scholars put a stop to it themselves. I don't understand why many of our Shia brethren choose to get their religion from Noha reciters, who have been enjoying massive popularity as well. It feels even more embarassing when Ahlul Sunnah, to their absolute credit, have popular Quran reciters while we run behind the poets.

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Has anyone ever driven with the handbrake still up? Also what were the consequences ? I didn't realise my handbrake was up till i pulled up outside my house and there was a strong smell of plastic burning... does that mean i fluffed out my car? 

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Just now, 123xo said:

Has anyone ever driven with the handbrake still up? Also what were the consequences ? I didn't realise my handbrake was up till i pulled up outside my house and there was a strong smell of plastic burning... does that mean i fluffed out my car? 

Probably ok, but your hand brake might not work as well now.  How long did you drive like that? Everyone does this kind of thing occasionally, whether they admit it or not.  

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9 minutes ago, notme said:

Probably ok, but your hand brake might not work as well now.  How long did you drive like that? Everyone does this kind of thing occasionally, whether they admit it or not.  

I really hope so! I'll be seeing a mechanic on Monday inshallah but i'm just not sure if its alright to drive it till then tho especially with the strong burning smell i'm scared it will cause me problems on the road or catches fire as thats what some people on google are saying & it was a 10mins drive alhamdulilah it wasn't a long drive.

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10 minutes ago, 123xo said:

i'm scared it will cause me problems on the road or catches fire

The risk of catching fire it only while you are driving with the brake on.  There is no danger of that after you've let it cool. Just let the smell scare you into not doing it again. It's a good idea to see a mechanic. You'll be fine driving until then, but avoid parking on a hill until you've had your brake checked.  

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3 hours ago, hamz786 said:

Something I've been against for a long time but I don't see it ending anytime soon until the top scholars put a stop to it themselves. I don't understand why many of our Shia brethren choose to get their religion from Noha reciters, who have been enjoying massive popularity as well. It feels even more embarassing when Ahlul Sunnah, to their absolute credit, have popular Quran reciters while we run behind the poets.

I share the frustration completely. But I also think that the top scholars do try, but people choose to follow them where it suits their fancy, and ignore them where it doesn't. 

Yes, this celebrity nohekhwan culture has gotten out of hands and it has pretty much done to the Shi'a religious culture what invasive species do to local ecosystems- finished and cannibalized everything else. Youngsters follow them like the mice followed the Pied Piper of Hamlin; literally every other Shi'a teenager who can put two half-syllables together with a nasal whine has a YouTube channel and is an aspiring noha 'artist'. The quran has been left to gather dust. Such is the neglect of the Book of Allah that I don't even know where to begin ranting about this. We either don't recite the Quran at all or even when we do, there is no trace of tajweed. I am not saying that everyone needs to become a qari, but it is absolutely pathetic that most are not even acquainted with elementary tajweed. Many- and let me stick out my neck by saying this- even most within the Shi'a laity cannot even pronounce the letters from their correct makhraj and have almost never heard of even the basic ahkam of tajweed. In stark contrast, the Sunni children are taught all of this from the very beginning. I don't think people even understand how dangerous this is; mispronouncing the letters can invalidate our prayers. 

Iran is somewhere that I have noticed that things are beginning to change, as can be seen from the recent splendid performance of the young Iranian qurra in several recital competitions. But the rest of the Shi'a world has to go a long way before it can catch up. 

And this isn't even all. Many of our classical books of fiqh, aqeedah and history, as well as much of our Hadith literature have now been translated into English. With the launch of things like the Thaqalayn app, people don't have any cause to complain anymore- all the volumes of al-Kafi are on their smartphone screens, in English. Where is the involvement of the Shi'a youth in these classics? What use is beefing with the Sunnis online when we ourselves are unaware of the Ahlul Bayt's heritage, and all that most of us understand by religion is cheap theatrics in the name of devotion? 

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7 hours ago, notme said:

Everyone does this kind of thing occasionally, whether they admit it or not.  

Hi Salam just to clarify. Do you mean everyone in the women's section of the mosque or generally everyone? 

Kind regards 

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4 hours ago, AbdusSibtayn said:

Yes, this celebrity nohekhwan culture has gotten out of hands and it has pretty much done to the Shi'a religious culture what invasive species do to local ecosystems- finished and cannibalized everything els

Yes religion is not about following what sounds and feels fun. 

Spirituality is found in doing things that are instructed by Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) and the Ahlulbayt (عليه السلام). Even if these acts seem boring there is much to be acquired. The first thing is to never neglect the wajibāt in pursuit of the mustahabāt otherwise there is no spirituality and we are deceiving ourselves. And this involves becoming acquainted with the wajibāt by reading the Risalah 'Amaliya. Also learning about the muharramāt so one can strictly avoid disobeying Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى).

Azadari is a mustahab act and there is no one way to do it so that's why you have all these different rituals that emerge in different communities and cultures. Azadari has evolved over the years. But if there is no supervision then you might have some strange rituals emerging and becoming trends. Rituals that may also make you feel uncomfortable as I have on numerous occasions finding it hard to justify them. There may also be an emergence of this celebrity worship culture. This mass hype and a sort of party where you have loud speakers being blasted while people flick their hands up and down to get the crowd excited and pumped. Maybe we have gone down the wrong path in some elements and could shift our focus towards other aspects.

I would argue, why don't we engage in acts that have been directly encouraged by the Ahlulbayt (عليه السلام). Poetry was one of the main elements of the majalis of the early Shi'a community. There are plenty of ways to remember the Ahlulbayt (عليه السلام) without losing the plot.

Maybe focusing more on the Qur'an because we have a big chunk of evidence in relation to the rewards of its recitation. Instead of always listening to loud latmiyas like nashaai people, we could eagerly listen to the Qur'an and create this culture of proper recitation with the correct tajwīd. Encouraging our communities to develop their basic Arabic skills or at least gain access to quality tafasīr so they can dwell more deep into the Qur'an. Also creating this hadith culture and placing emphasis on developing a relationship with the hadith corpus. Like you said a lot of it has already been translated so there is no excuse to not become familiar with it. We could perhaps revisit our rich du'a heritage and encourage people to become acquainted with the du'a taught by the Ahlulbayt (عليه السلام) and earn the thawāb. Also studying history, learning more about all the Prophets ((صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم)), the seerah of our final Prophet ((صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم)), aqeedah, fiqh development of Hadith and history of the Qur'an etc. 

I don't think all the laymen strictly need to become scholars but they should at least be students of knowledge, there is no third option. To have a level of knowledge where the community is able to discern rituals or matters which make the community stagnant. To create an environment where one is spiritually uplifted and gains a genuine connection to God.

 

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3 hours ago, SO SOLID SHIA said:

Hi Salam just to clarify. Do you mean everyone in the women's section of the mosque or generally everyone? 

Kind regards 

Take it easy, man.  I'm just trying to make the child feel better! 

Many people I've known, but mostly me.  

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17 hours ago, AbdusSibtayn said:

I share the frustration completely. But I also think that the top scholars do try, but people choose to follow them where it suits their fancy, and ignore them where it doesn't. 

Yes, this celebrity nohekhwan culture has gotten out of hands and it has pretty much done to the Shi'a religious culture what invasive species do to local ecosystems- finished and cannibalized everything else. Youngsters follow them like the mice followed the Pied Piper of Hamlin; literally every other Shi'a teenager who can put two half-syllables together with a nasal whine has a YouTube channel and is an aspiring noha 'artist'. The quran has been left to gather dust. Such is the neglect of the Book of Allah that I don't even know where to begin ranting about this. We either don't recite the Quran at all or even when we do, there is no trace of tajweed. I am not saying that everyone needs to become a qari, but it is absolutely pathetic that most are not even acquainted with elementary tajweed. Many- and let me stick out my neck by saying this- even most within the Shi'a laity cannot even pronounce the letters from their correct makhraj and have almost never heard of even the basic ahkam of tajweed. In stark contrast, the Sunni children are taught all of this from the very beginning. I don't think people even understand how dangerous this is; mispronouncing the letters can invalidate our prayers. 

Iran is somewhere that I have noticed that things are beginning to change, as can be seen from the recent splendid performance of the young Iranian qurra in several recital competitions. But the rest of the Shi'a world has to go a long way before it can catch up. 

And this isn't even all. Many of our classical books of fiqh, aqeedah and history, as well as much of our Hadith literature have now been translated into English. With the launch of things like the Thaqalayn app, people don't have any cause to complain anymore- all the volumes of al-Kafi are on their smartphone screens, in English. Where is the involvement of the Shi'a youth in these classics? What use is beefing with the Sunnis online when we ourselves are unaware of the Ahlul Bayt's heritage, and all that most of us understand by religion is cheap theatrics in the name of devotion? 

Agreed. I know there are Shia reciters of Quran around the world but the fact that we give more importance to the poets can't be the way forward for us. However, we could end up making Qaris into celebrities as well, and there are a few well known Qaris who you could say have reached such a status.  

However regarding the point of having Hadith readily available, it leads to plenty of people who have no background in Hadith science etc., becoming 'Experts' on Hadith all of a sudden. I've seen it plenty of times online with people pulling Hadiths out of nowhere and not even knowing or acknowledging whether it is strong or weak. But then I guess we could extend that to the speakers as well, where plenty of Hadith are quoted in lectures without a source. 

@ali_fatheroforphans I also agree with your idea of using the Quran during Majalis and it is something I've thought about a lot too. The one thing constant in Azadari is the value of tears. Just hearing the story of Karbala has people in tears, then why do we need to do something extra in Matam etc. etc. My belief is there is no need to use this 'expression of emotion' when you wouldn't do the same as repentance towards Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى). It makes no sense to me.

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16 hours ago, hamz786 said:

Hadiths out of nowhere and not even knowing or acknowledging whether it is strong or weak. But then I guess we could extend that to the speakers as well, where plenty of Hadith are quoted in lectures without a source. 

Becoming familiar versus an expert on it is different.

It is also important to take note of the content. If a hadith focuses on akhlaqi issues that are self-evident, (for example being good to parents etc.) then I would argue it doesn't necessarily require one to do rigorous research to check the chain as long as the source is mentioned properly. 

I find it problematic when people solely rely on ahadith to prove certain theological positions or even dwell into jurisprudence matters. I'm referring to ahadith that one may think is probative in nature. Obviously this can result in issues if one has not studied the foundational sciences.

But none of this should prevent anyone in gaining familiarity.

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On 1/18/2024 at 10:30 PM, AbdusSibtayn said:

We need Saudi-style haram police in the atabat. Enough of the bloodcurdling cringe has been allowed to go on for too long. 

Individual expressions of love for the infallibles is fine, but strobe lights flashing, giant speakers on trucks blasting the shrine-cities with eardrum-shredding music, semi-naked men in mixed gatherings beating themselves unconscious as if in a drug induced frenzy, lumpen youth dancing like drunk rioters in some borderland tavern, is this a pilgrimage or a rave party? And this cringe flooding the shrine-cities every year? All in the name of 'latm'/ 'shoor'/ 'nohe-khwani'? 

We don't need thuggish bullies like the mutawwiyeen, but some sort of supervision is badly needed. Just to kick all these miscreants out. I hear the management at the Abbasiyah shrine kicked them out this year. Commendable step. Purge the shrine-cities. 

Salam all of these bizarre things only happens during first 10 days of Muharram which due to overpopulation controlling mass crowd is impossible for anyone or any security group who are in charge of controlling shrines which in rest of year all of people are doing normal pilgrimage without doing bizarre actions also only few groups are doing such bizarre actions which you have seen exaggeration of it in youtube & etc through mixing of multiple movies of ten days as just one day which it's not  acceptable in name of "'latm'/ 'shoor'/ 'nohe-khwani'" which only few grouplets have distorted it although their distortion is just limited  to first 10 days of Muharram 

 

There is no "mutawwiyeen" in any of shrines which there is only two types of  supervisors in shrine which traditional ones are Sayyids who have small green turban around a red fez & long dark navy blue robes who have inherited it from their fathers & other group are employees who are  wearing  gray coat & pants which both groups are treating pilgrims with high respect which news about  existence of thuggish bullies like the mutawwiyeen has been spread from anti shia channels based typical procedure of wahabis for defaming Shias which they think everyone who works in Shia shrines are people likewise audi-style haram police in Mecca & Medina . 

 

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On 1/20/2024 at 10:34 AM, 123xo said:

Has anyone ever driven with the handbrake still up? Also what were the consequences ? I didn't realise my handbrake was up till i pulled up outside my house and there was a strong smell of plastic burning... does that mean i fluffed out my car? 

I’ve been there. I remember wondering why the car is being so annoying until I parked the car, tried pressing the handbrake, only to realize it’s already pressed. Felt that tiny heart attack but never told anyone in the home about it. Phew! Consequences? Ask my elder brother. I don’t know! :verryhappy:

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On 1/20/2024 at 7:04 PM, 123xo said:

Has anyone ever driven with the handbrake still up? Also what were the consequences ? I didn't realise my handbrake was up till i pulled up outside my house and there was a strong smell of plastic burning... does that mean i fluffed out my car? 

 

On 1/20/2024 at 7:13 PM, 123xo said:

I really hope so! I'll be seeing a mechanic on Monday inshallah but i'm just not sure if its alright to drive it till then tho especially with the strong burning smell i'm scared it will cause me problems on the road or catches fire as thats what some people on google are saying & it was a 10mins drive alhamdulilah it wasn't a long drive.

Possible fire

Maybe this is the worst possible scenario, but there is such a possibility. If the driver has activated the handbrake and presses on the gas pedal without paying attention to the various signs, it may be due to the high friction between the brake pad and the drum (wheel bowl), the temperature of the relevant parts will increase greatly and the brake oil that is in the back There is a brake cylinder, it will catch fire, of course, it should be kept in mind that the probability of this situation is very low, but it is not impossible. Even if there is no fire, it will cause severe damage to the brake system components.

Mirroring the pads

This is the most common sign of driving with the handbrake on, but it is very serious. Excessive friction from the parking brake being engaged will overheat the brakes and when they cool down again, it can create a "glaze" on the drums and pads.

When this happens, the surface becomes smoother than it should be, and the high heat causes the pad to lose its properties, which causes your car's braking power to drop dramatically.

If the amount of heat increase is not too high, after using the brake system for a while, the glaze on the pads will disappear and the brake performance will return to its normal state, but if the damage to the surface of the pads and drums is too high, the pads and drums should be replaced. 

https://renault-iran.com/magazine/fa/news/377/رانندگی-با-ترمز-دستی-بالا-چه-مشکلاتی-ایجاد-می-کند-

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Note that after driving with active brakes, even if you don't encounter a fire, you should show your car to a qualified mechanic so that it can be fixed quickly if any brake parts are damaged. At this time, due to the fact that the brake pads become worn and slippery, the pads and drums also lose their proper thickness. But because the surface structure of the pad has changed due to continuous heat caused by long-term movement with hand brakes in high position, it can no longer perform normal braking and will not have the good performance of the past.

At this time, the handbrake must be adjusted to eliminate worn and slippery pads. But this only works for a short time. In order to completely solve the problem, the pad shoes must be replaced. But it is possible to solve the problem for a longer time by rubbing the surface of the old pad with very coarse sandpaper and adjusting the drums inside the wheel well.

https://aghayeemdad.com/رانندگی-با-ترمز-دستی-بالا-چه-مشکلاتی-را/

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On 1/21/2024 at 4:37 PM, hamz786 said:

However regarding the point of having Hadith readily available, it leads to plenty of people who have no background in Hadith science etc., becoming 'Experts' on Hadith all of a sudden. I've seen it plenty of times online with people pulling Hadiths out of nowhere and not even knowing or acknowledging whether it is strong or weak. But then I guess we could extend that to the speakers as well, where plenty of Hadith are quoted in lectures without a source. 

This has also become a plague in its own right. It gives a boost to the egos of rebellious juveniles, clinical contrarians, and all and sundry who have a problem with religious authority. Because they subscribe to that simplistic view of religion, they come up with a jaundiced view of the whole scholarship. Nevertheless, I still strongly advocate a familiarity with our early literature, not just to gain knowledge, but to gain an insight into the spiritual culture of the Ahlul Bayt (ams)- what it was supposed to be versus what it has become.

On 1/21/2024 at 10:04 PM, Abu_Zahra said:

@hamz786

@ali_fatheroforphans

@AbdusSibtayn

I believe the reason why there is such a strong resistance to reevaluating priorities, as well as the understanding of 'religiosity' in our communities, is because personal interests have become heavily vested in the modern day business of 'aza.

In other words, various personalities have too much to lose if we remodel our societies upon the manhaj of the Ahlulbayt (عليه السلام) and their closest followers. 

Voice, video editing, social media, studio recordings, polemics, theatrics, have been sufficient in recent years to gain status, fame and money. If this was all sidelined in favor of knowledge and religious activism, then those who have benefitted from the status quo would fade away and become less and less relevant. 

Of course, there are vested interests, but let us not underestimate the power of pure jahl. Many among the laity have great trouble accepting something that contradicts what they grew up believing, or learned from hearsay and community legends, even if the former might be 100% correct.

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Thought this was a cool little film where 3 honorable men face their enemies, I do not recall who the third person was, but 2 of them are obviously imam Ali and Al hamza.

https://www.facebook.com/reel/556417019237165?s=yWDuG2&fs=e

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Dude, even Sunnis are laughing at him. I hope Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) destroys all the hypocrites asap. 
 

 

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3 hours ago, Quran313 said:

The one born in Kaaba.

 

EShjQXKUYAAsUiD.jpg

Sunnis have fabricated or weakened the hadiths that claim imam Ali was born inside the kaaba, and instead it was actually hakim ibn hizam.

 

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I really like diving into Islamic geometry. When I get into it it is a mindfulness meditation for me. And I feel relieved to see all the pieces coming together into a coherent whole. I would like to learn how to put tahzib into the geometries and am looking for an online teacher. If you know of any please let me know. 

 

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People who often listen to one type of speaker or refer to the books and opinions of one person often develop polarised thinking and are at risk of spitting out the words of those specific individual during conversations.

The issue is when one starts using the opinions and words of those experts in intellectual discussions and arguments without referring to those individuals. It is made to seem as if the recipient has arrived at such a conclusion despite having no idea on the premises used and the technicalities.

This is why it is a good practice for one to always quote the actual scholar and expert when a certain idea, theory or conclusion is directly taken from them. I have myself known of an individual who is a speaker in our community and he would start sharing the words of a scholar without any reference. Many people think it is him sharing all these opinions with certainty whereas I know the real individual behind. 

On the other hand if we share our own ideas and thoughts which may have been inspired by others then that is a separate issue. I hope the distinction is clear.

Edited by ali_fatheroforphans
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IDF may have violated international law in West Bank hospital raid, experts say

IDF members raided the Ibn Sina Hospital in Jenin on Monday, one expert said.

Quote

Members of the IDF disguised themselves as doctors and patients to infiltrate the Ibn Sina Hospital in Jenin on Monday and killed three Palestinian men whom Hamas and the Islamic Jihad both claimed as members, Dr. Wisam Sebehat, general director of the Palestinian Health Ministry in Jenin, told ABC News.

PHOTO: In this image taken from surveillance video provided by the Palestinian Health Ministry, Israeli forces disguised as civilian women and medical workers hold weapons in a hallway at the Ibn Sina Hospital in the West Bank town of Jenin, Jan. 30, 2024

One IDF member had a wheelchair, two carried a doll in a baby carrier, several wore nurses' clothing, another wore doctors' clothing and several others were dressed in civilian clothing, Sebehat said. Doctors and patients are granted "protected status" in armed conflict under the Geneva Convention.

Quote

The experts cautioned that ultimately the International Criminal Court is the body that can determine if international law was violated during the raid, but they pointed to elements of the Rome Statute, the governing treaty of the ICC, and the study on the rules of customary international humanitarian law the IDF may have violated in conducting the raid. The United States, along with China, India, Russia -- about 40 countries total -- did not sign the Rome Statute and are not party to the ICC, according to the Council on Foreign Relations.

The ICC is different from the International Court of Justice, which issued a preliminary ruling last week in a case brought by South Africa against Israel accusing Israel of committing genocide against Palestinians.

Quote

It's a violation of international law to feign protected status, in this case, by dressing up as a doctor or patient, "in order to invite the confidence of the adversary and then proceed to kill or injure them," Aurel Sari, associate professor of public international law at the University of Exeter, told ABC News. This violates the prohibition to kill or injure the adversary by resorting to perfidy, Sari said.

Israel is not a member of the ICC and rejects the court's jurisdiction, but the ICC prosecutor has investigated Israel's actions toward Palestinians before.

Quote

"The rule is part of customary international law in both international and non-international armed conflicts, which means Israel is bound by it," Sari said.

"Based on what has been reported, it appears that the Israeli forces involved in the operation in the Ibn Sina Hospital in Jenin did resort to perfidy in violation of the law of armed conflict," Sari added.

One of the Palestinian men who was killed, Basel Ghazawi, was being treated in the Ibn Sina Hospital and was paralyzed, Sebehat said. The IDF denied the reports that Ghazawi was paralyzed.

"Combatants who have been incapacitated by wounds or sickness are protected from attack as persons 'hors de combat,'" under international law, Dannenbaum said. "Clearly, someone who is paralyzed is incapacitated in that respect, so an attack on that individual would be prohibited. Violating that prohibition would be a war crime."

Quote

The other possible violation of international law the IDF may have committed in this case is violating the prohibition on attacking combatants who have been incapacitated by wounds or sickness, or attacking persons "hors de combat," associate professor of international law Tom Dannenbaum told ABC News.

"Along with Jalamneh, two additional terrorists who hid inside the hospital were neutralized," the IDF said in the statement. The IDF did not specify why the two other men were killed but said all three men were Hamas operatives.

Quote

"To conclude that a war crime has been committed, criminal tribunals avail themselves not rarely of years of investigations and assessments," Robert Kolb, professor of public international law and international organization at the University of Geneva, told ABC News.

https://abcnews.go.com/International/idf-may-have-violated-international-law-west-bank-hospital-raid/story?id=106810456

https://www.sott.net/article/488382-Israeli-special-forces-disguised-as-Muslim-women-men-and-doctors-kill-three-militants-at-West-Bank-hospital

https://www.yahoo.com/news/watch-israeli-soldiers-disguise-raid-122631227.html

Quote

The Palestinian health ministry condemned the attack. Hospital officials said Basel Ghawazi was being treated after being partially paralysed in an Israeli airstrike on a Jenin cemetery in November that killed four, including a 15-year-old boy. All those who died in that attack were named by Palestinian media as members of the Jenin Battalion.

A hospital spokesperson, Tawfiq al-Shobaki, said there was no exchange of fire during the raid but that the Israelis attacked doctors, nurses and hospital security. In security camera footage, one of the undercover agents can be seen searching a man against a wall with his hands above his head.

“What happened is a precedent,” he said. “There was never an assassination inside a hospital. There were arrests and assaults but not an assassination.”

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2024/jan/30/israel-forces-disguised-women-medics-storm-hospital-jenin-west-bank

 

 

 

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Based on personal stories I have heard from others pornography and other lewd behaviour is more common than one may imagine even amongst elderly married men who are well past their fifties. Some even secretly have affairs and do stuff with prostitutes. The desire of the human being will make one into a wild beast if one goes down the path over the years. 

I just want this to be a lesson especially for the young brothers. Do your best to lower your gaze and get out of these dirty habits before you get married. This involves  taking small steps to effectively channel your desires. Avoid unnecessary interactions with the opposite gender. Hang out with the right groups who remind you of God. Stay connected to Shi'a communities (in-person and/or online) and try to regularly put yourself in that environment. Take your wajibat seriously by always praying on time along with other duties such as khums, fasting, hajj etc. Keep busy with productive hobbies such as reading, learning about Islam, sport, gym etc.

If you need more to stay away from such habits go see a professional who can help you with this (especially if it is full on addiction). 

Remember that all of this is training for your nafs and you're setting yourself up for success Develop good healthy habits in your youth and stay away from such activities that erode your masculinity and humanity and take you further away from God. 

May God make us all successful in staying away from anything which takes us away from Him especially the modern sins that are associated with the lust. 

 

Edited by ali_fatheroforphans
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4 hours ago, ali_fatheroforphans said:

Based on personal stories I have heard from others pornography and other lewd behaviour is more common than one may imagine even amongst elderly married men who are well past their fifties. Some even secretly have affairs and do stuff with prostitutes. The desire of the human being will make one into a wild beast if one goes down the path over the years. 

I just want this to be a lesson especially for the young brothers. Do your best to lower your gaze and get out of these dirty habits before you get married. This involves  taking small steps to effectively channel your desires. Avoid unnecessary interactions with the opposite gender. Hang out with the right groups who remind you of God. Stay connected to Shi'a communities (in-person and/or online) and try to regularly put yourself in that environment. Take your wajibat seriously by always praying on time along with other duties such as khums, fasting, hajj etc. Keep busy with productive hobbies such as reading, learning about Islam, sport, gym etc.

If you need more to stay away from such habits go see a professional who can help you with this (especially if it is full on addiction). 

Remember that all of this is training for your nafs and you're setting yourself up for success Develop good healthy habits in your youth and stay away from such activities that erode your masculinity and humanity and take you further away from God. 

May God make us all successful in staying away from anything which takes us away from Him especially the modern sins that are associated with the lust. 

 

This is all because of the society we live in, all haram things is normalized. We can’t even watch tv like before, almost all series even arab tv series and cartoon are sexualized. They are trying to destroy us and sadly no one can do anything about it.

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