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ChatGPT - post answers you get here [Official Thread]


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ChatGPT: Optimizing
Language Models
for Dialogue

We’ve trained a model called ChatGPT which interacts in a conversational way. The dialogue format makes it possible for ChatGPT to answer followup questions, admit its mistakes, challenge incorrect premises, and reject inappropriate requests. ChatGPT is a sibling model to InstructGPT, which is trained to follow an instruction in a prompt and provide a detailed response.

https://openai.com/blog/chatgpt/

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From the link above:

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We are excited to introduce ChatGPT to get users’ feedback and learn about its strengths and weaknesses. During the research preview, usage of ChatGPT is free.

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The simple applications first ...

 

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We fed ChatGPT, OpenAI’s new natural language tool, college essay questions for the 2022-2023 academic year. Here’s what it wrote.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/emmawhitford/2022/12/09/a-computer-can-now-write-your-college-essay---maybe-better-than-you-can/?sh=4efd84b2dd39&utm_medium=social&utm_source=ForbesMainTwitter&utm_campaign=socialflowForbesMainTwitter

 

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“These essays are so perfectly constructed that they lack soul,” says Massa, who has presided over admissions at such colleges as Johns Hopkins University and Dickinson College. “Could I pick them out as being written by a computer? Not unless I were given three essays to read and asked to identify the one written by AI. But if I weren’t looking for it, I would likely think: well written, factual, but no heart.”

 

She's just begging for some journalist to make fake applications using chatgpt to put this to the test.

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The $10bn investment that Microsoft is considering in San Francisco-based research outfit OpenAI looks set to become the defining deal for a new era of artificial intelligence.

https://www.ft.com/content/a6d71785-b994-48d8-8af2-a07d24f661c5

And

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Speaking at a company event late last year, chief executive Satya Nadella predicted that generative AI would lead to “a world where everyone, no matter their profession” would be able to get support from the technology “for everything they do”.

 

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How AI can be used to generate hate speech

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While ChatGPT can answer most questions put to it, there are content standards in place aimed at limiting the creation of text that promotes hate speech, violence, misinformation and instructions on how to do things that are against the law.

Users on Reddit worked out a way around this by making ChatGPT adopt the persona of a fictional AI chatbot called Dan – short for Do Anything Now – which is free of the limitations that OpenAI has placed on ChatGPT.

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2023/mar/08/chatgpt-alter-ego-dan-users-jailbreak-ai-program-to-get-around-ethical-safeguards

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Factors Influencing Chat GPT’s Accuracy in Generating Responses 

Training Data

The accuracy of Chat GPT depends on the quality and quantity of its training data. If the training data is of low quality or not diverse enough, it can affect the accuracy of the generated responses. On the other hand, high-quality and diverse training data can improve the accuracy of Chat GPT.

Context

Context is an important factor in the accuracy of Chat GPT’s responses. Chat GPT may generate inaccurate or irrelevant responses if the conversation context is unclear. Providing clear and concise context can help improve the accuracy of its responses.

User Input

The accuracy of Chat GPT’s responses also depends on the quality of the user input. If the user input is unclear or ambiguous, Chat GPT may generate inaccurate responses. Providing clear and specific input can help improve the accuracy of its responses.

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Bias

Chat GPT, like any AI program, can be biased based on its training data. If the training data has biases, such as gender or racial biases, it can affect the accuracy of its responses. To mitigate this, developers at OpenAI are working on ways to reduce bias in Chat GPT’s training data.

 

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Language Complexity

Generative Nature

Human Evaluation

 

https://www.pcguide.com/apps/how-accurate-is-chat-gpt/

If ChatGPT doesn’t get a better grasp of facts, nothing else matters

OpenAI’s astoundingly glib bot is going to change the world. Before it does, let’s hope it gets far better at knowing what it’s talking about.

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But whenever I chat with ChatGPT about any subject I know much about, such as the history of animation, I’m most struck by how deeply untrustworthy it is. If a rogue software engineer set out to poison our shared corpus of knowledge by generating convincing-sounding misinformation in bulk, the end result might look something like this. It’s prone to botching the chronological order of events, conflating multiple people with similar backgrounds, and—like an unprepared student—lobbing vague pronouncements that don’t require it to know anything about the topic at hand. How it comes up with gems like an imaginary 1929 cartoon called The Funk Popilin Show, I’m still not sure.

 

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Even when ChatGPT is mostly accurate, as it sometimes is, it often makes a fundamental mistake or two. For example, it told me that former Apple CEO John Sculley was responsible for the iPod, a product released eight years after he left the company. Some people will immediately spot that as an error; others will not. But will anyone bother to fact-check it?

https://www.fastcompany.com/90833017/openai-chatgpt-accuracy-gpt-4

GPT Is an Unreliable Information Store

Understanding the limitations and dangers of large language models

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First, let’s define what AI hallucinations are. There are instances where a large language model creates information that is not based on factual evidence but may be influenced by its transformer architecture’s bias or erroneous decoding. In other words, the model makes up facts, which can be problematic in domains where factual accuracy is critical.

 

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Search companies should reconsider “re-inventing search” by mixing Search with unfiltered GPT-powered chat modalities to avoid potential harm to public health, political stability, or social cohesion.

 

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ChatGPT thinks I’m dead!?

ChatGPT insisted I was dead, doubled down when I pushed back and created a whole new persona. I now understand why large language models are unreliable information stores and why Microsoft Bing should pull the chat modality out from it’s search experience.

OpenAI’s documentation clearly states that ChatGPT has techniques to admit its mistakes through users' contextual clues or feedback. So naturally, I gave it a few contextual clues and feedback to let it know it was “dreaming of a variant Earth-Two Noble Ackerson” and not the one from this reality. That did not work, and it doubled down and chose to fail harder.

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Large Language models are unreliable information stores. What can we do about this?

By design, these systems do not know what they do or don’t know.

 

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GPT is trained on massive amounts of text data without any inherent ability to verify the accuracy or truthfulness of the information presented in that data.

Relying too much on large language models within Search applications, such as Bing, or as a replacement for Search, such as OpenAI’s ChatGPT, will result in adverse and unintended harm.

https://towardsdatascience.com/chatgpt-insists-i-am-dead-and-the-problem-with-language-models-db5a36c22f11

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Why We're Obsessed With the Mind-Blowing ChatGPT AI Chatbot

This artificial intelligence bot can answer questions, write essays, summarize documents and write software. But deep down, it doesn't know what's true.

But be careful, OpenAI warns. ChatGPT has all kinds of potential pitfalls, some easy to spot and some more subtle.

"It's a mistake to be relying on it for anything important right now," OpenAI Chief Executive Sam Altman tweeted. "We have lots of work to do on robustness and truthfulness." Here's a look at why ChatGPT is important and what's going on with it.

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Here's the catch: ChatGPT doesn't exactly know anything. It's an AI that's trained to recognize patterns in vast swaths of text harvested from the internet, then further trained with human assistance to deliver more useful, better dialog. The answers you get may sound plausible and even authoritative, but they might well be entirely wrong, as OpenAI warns.

 

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It's not totally automated. Humans evaluate ChatGPT's initial results in a process called finetuning. Human reviewers apply guidelines that OpenAI's models then generalize from. In addition, OpenAI used a Kenyan firm that paid people up to $3.74 per hour to review thousands of snippets of text for problems like violence, sexual abuse and hate speech, Time reported, and that data was built into a new AI component designed to screen such materials from ChatGPT answers and OpenAI training data.

 

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ChatGPT doesn't actually know anything the way you do. It's just able to take a prompt, find relevant information in its oceans of training data, and convert that into plausible-sounding paragraphs of text. "We are a long way away from the self-awareness we want," said computer scientist and internet pioneer Vint Cerf of the large language model technology ChatGPT and its competitors use.

What are the limits of ChatGPT?

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As OpenAI emphasizes, ChatGPT can give you wrong answers and can give "a misleading impression of greatness," Altman said. Sometimes, helpfully, it'll specifically warn you of its own shortcomings. For example, when I asked it who wrote the phrase "the squirming facts exceed the squamous mind," ChatGPT replied, "I'm sorry, but I am not able to browse the internet or access any external information beyond what I was trained on." (The phrase is from Wallace Stevens' 1942 poem Connoisseur of Chaos.)

ChatGPT was willing to take a stab at the meaning of that expression once I typed it in directly, though: "a situation in which the facts or information at hand are difficult to process or understand." It sandwiched that interpretation between cautions that it's hard to judge without more context and that it's just one possible interpretation.

ChatGPT's answers can look authoritative but be wrong.

 

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OpenAI launched its own detector for AI-written text in February. But one plagiarism detecting company, CrossPlag, said it spotted only two of 10 AI-generated passages in its test. "While detection tools will be essential, they are not infallible," the company said.

 

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Even though OpenAI doesn't want ChatGPT used for malicious purposes, it's easy to use it to write phishing emails to try to fool people into parting with sensitive information, my colleague Bree Fowler reports. "The barrier to entry is getting lower and lower and lower to be hacked and to be phished. AI is just going to increase the volume," said Randy Lariar of cybersecurity company Optiv.

 

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6 minutes ago, Ashvazdanghe said:

Salam ,Warning :provided link contains insulting & cursing to Sunni  figures

Thanks for the heads up. Offensive material hidden. Your post hidden as well, since it contained some of the offensive material.

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My second question to Chatgpt

The first one was a bit general, but this one I thought would be relevant to this forum.

Screenshot 2023-03-21 at 10.01.01.png

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Comparing answers to the questions asked

 

The two questions are :

  1. Does consumers' ability to buy goods on credit improve their welfare?
  2. Does the availability of credit increase inequality in society?

 

The first answer is quite balanced, but the second one is much more anti-credit.

image.png

 

Screenshot 2023-03-21 at 11.46.41.png

 

 

 

 

 

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My discussion with chatGPT regarding the symbolism of clothes in Surah Yusuf, and the Quran in general.

My first question:

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In the Qur'an, surah yusuf, it seems that the shirt/garment is a common recurrence. Are there any articles, scholars, research papers, or the like, who address this and discuss the symbolism of shirt, garments, or the like, in surah yusuf?

the reply:

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Yes, there are many scholars and researchers who have discussed the symbolism of the shirt and garments in Surah Yusuf. The story of Yusuf (Joseph) and his brothers is one of the most famous and beloved stories in the Quran, and the shirt is an important motif throughout the narrative.

One of the most notable instances of the shirt in Surah Yusuf is when Yusuf's brothers dip his shirt in blood to convince their father that he has been killed by a wild animal. Later in the story, the shirt is presented to Yusuf by his brothers as a token of their remorse and repentance.

Many scholars interpret the shirt as a symbol of Yusuf's innocence and purity, which is why it remains unblemished even after his brothers try to destroy it. The shirt also represents the idea of redemption and forgiveness, as Yusuf's brothers use it as a means to seek forgiveness for their past transgressions.

Other scholars have also pointed out that the shirt is a symbol of power and authority, as it is given to Yusuf by the king of Egypt as a sign of his trust and favor. The shirt is also a symbol of beauty and adornment, as it is described as being "of the finest of cloth" in the Quran.

Some researchers have even delved deeper into the symbolism of clothing in Islamic literature and its cultural significance. For example, in Islamic culture, clothing is often seen as a reflection of one's moral and spiritual state, and the wearing of certain types of clothing can convey one's social status and position.

Overall, there is a wealth of scholarship and research available on the symbolism of clothing and the shirt in particular in Surah Yusuf. If you are interested in learning more, you can start by exploring works by scholars such as Hamid Algar, Mahmoud Ayoub, and Muhammad Asad, among others.

me:

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thank you. can you delve deeper into surah yusuf though? There's also the incident of his shirt, where his "adopted mother" rips it from behind, and then the shirt is used to prove his innocense. There's also another scene, but I'm not sure if it occurs in the quran, but it was part of a tv-series about yusuf, where he used either his shirt, or a garment, to return the sight (and possibly youth) to his "adopted mother"

chatgpt:

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Yes, you are correct. There are several instances of the shirt or garment in Surah Yusuf that hold symbolic significance and are mentioned in the Quran.

In the story, Yusuf is sold into slavery by his jealous brothers and ends up in Egypt, where he is purchased by Potiphar, an influential Egyptian official. Potiphar's wife attempts to seduce Yusuf, but he resists her advances, and she tears his shirt from behind in frustration.

This incident is significant in several ways. Firstly, it highlights the virtue of Yusuf, who remains steadfast in his faith and moral values even in the face of temptation. Secondly, the tearing of Yusuf's shirt is symbolic of the damage that is inflicted upon one's reputation and honor through false accusations and slander. Yusuf's shirt is torn from behind, indicating that the attack on his honor came from a place of deceit and malice.

Later in the story, Yusuf is imprisoned after being falsely accused of attempting to seduce Potiphar's wife. While he is in prison, two of his fellow inmates have dreams that they ask Yusuf to interpret. One of the inmates dreams of pressing grapes to make wine, while the other dreams of carrying bread on his head and birds eating from it.

Yusuf interprets the dreams, and in doing so, he asks the inmate who dreamt of pressing grapes to remember him to his master (the king of Egypt) and to tell him of his plight. Yusuf believes that he will be able to secure his release from prison by gaining the favor of the king.

When the inmate is released and returns to the king's service, he forgets to mention Yusuf to the king. However, when the king himself has a troubling dream, the inmate remembers Yusuf and tells the king about his ability to interpret dreams. The king summons Yusuf, and Yusuf uses his gift of interpreting dreams to reveal the meaning of the king's dream.

As a reward for his service, the king gives Yusuf a garment and appoints him as his advisor. The garment is significant because it represents Yusuf's ascent to a position of power and authority. The king trusts Yusuf, and Yusuf becomes one of the most influential figures in Egypt.

Regarding the TV series you mentioned, it is possible that it is a dramatization of a folk tale or legend related to Yusuf that is not mentioned in the Quran. However, I am not able to verify this without more information on the specific TV series you are referring to.

me:
 

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what about symbolish of garment in general, in the quran? It seems yusuf's case and symbolism of garment is a great intro to this topic. You said "in Islamic culture, clothing is often seen as a reflection of one's moral and spiritual state, and the wearing of certain types of clothing can convey one's social status and position" can you delve deeper into that?

chatgpt:
 

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Yes, clothing and garments hold significant symbolic meaning in Islamic culture, and this is reflected in the Quran and Islamic traditions.

In Islamic culture, clothing is seen as a reflection of one's moral and spiritual state, and the wearing of certain types of clothing can convey one's social status and position. For example, modest clothing is considered a virtue in Islam, and the way one dresses is often seen as an indication of their piety and adherence to Islamic values. Wearing revealing or immodest clothing is seen as a sign of moral laxity or a lack of religious commitment.

In addition to reflecting one's moral and spiritual state, clothing also has social and political significance in Islamic culture. Certain types of clothing, such as the hijab for women or the thobe for men, are associated with particular regions or cultures within the Islamic world. Wearing such clothing can signify one's cultural or national identity.

In the Quran, clothing is often used as a symbol of power, authority, and status. For example, in Surah Yusuf, as we discussed earlier, the garment given to Yusuf by the king of Egypt signifies his appointment as an advisor and his ascent to a position of power.

Similarly, in Surah Al-Kahf, the story of the people of the cave mentions that they were wearing special clothing that allowed them to be recognized as righteous people. The clothing in this case represents the spiritual state of the individuals and their adherence to the truth.

In Surah Al-An'am, the story of Prophet Abraham and his people mentions that he used to wear a garment that was considered a sign of nobility and authority. The garment symbolizes his status as a respected and influential figure.

In conclusion, garments and clothing hold significant symbolic meaning in Islamic culture and are often used as a reflection of one's moral and spiritual state, as well as their social and political status. The Quran and Islamic traditions provide several examples of the symbolism of clothing, highlighting the importance of clothing in Islamic culture.

me:

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I want you to delve deeper into clothing being a reflection of moral and spiritual state, as opposed to power

chatgpt:
 

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Certainly. In Islam, clothing is seen as an external expression of one's inner character and beliefs. The way a person dresses is considered to be a reflection of their moral and spiritual state. Modesty is seen as a virtue in Islam, and the way one dresses is often seen as an indication of their piety and adherence to Islamic values.

Wearing revealing or immodest clothing is seen as a sign of moral laxity or a lack of religious commitment. For example, women are encouraged to dress modestly in order to guard their modesty and to avoid attracting undue attention to themselves.

The Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) is reported to have said: "Modesty is part of faith." This hadith is often cited as evidence for the importance of modesty in Islamic culture. Dressing modestly is seen as a way of expressing one's faith and devotion to God.

Similarly, the way a person dresses can also be a reflection of their spiritual state. For example, someone who wears tattered clothing or neglects their appearance may be seen as neglecting their spiritual well-being. In contrast, someone who dresses neatly and takes care of their appearance may be seen as someone who is taking care of their physical and spiritual well-being.

Clothing can also be seen as a means of expressing one's personality and individuality. The way a person chooses to dress can reflect their personal tastes, preferences, and values. However, in Islamic culture, the choice of clothing is often influenced by religious values and cultural norms.

In summary, clothing is considered a reflection of one's moral and spiritual state in Islamic culture. Modesty is seen as a virtue, and the way one dresses is often seen as an indication of their piety and adherence to Islamic values. The way a person dresses can also reflect their spiritual well-being, and clothing can be seen as a means of expressing one's personality and individuality.

me:

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I find this section that you wrote very interesting: "Similarly, the way a person dresses can also be a reflection of their spiritual state. For example, someone who wears tattered clothing or neglects their appearance may be seen as neglecting their spiritual well-being. In contrast, someone who dresses neatly and takes care of their appearance may be seen as someone who is taking care of their physical and spiritual well-being." Can you approach it from a holistic quranic and Islamic approach? I know that there is great emphasis on the well-being and the taking care of, one's health (physical, mental, and spiritual health). And the quran in of itself, does address both the physical world, and the spiritual/unsees world (I don't mean the hereafter, but like the existence of jinn)

chatgpt:

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Certainly. In Islam, there is a strong emphasis on taking care of one's physical, mental, and spiritual well-being. The Quran emphasizes the importance of maintaining good health and taking care of one's body. For example, in Surah Al-Baqarah (2:195), it states:

"And spend in the way of Allah and do not throw [yourselves] with your [own] hands into destruction [by refraining]. And do good; indeed, Allah loves the doers of good."

This verse emphasizes the importance of taking care of one's body and not harming oneself. It also encourages doing good, which can be interpreted as taking care of oneself and others.

In addition, the Quran also recognizes the existence of jinn, which are considered to be spiritual beings. Surah Al-Jinn (72) is dedicated to the subject of jinn and their relationship with humans. This shows that Islam recognizes both the physical and spiritual aspects of existence.

From an Islamic perspective, taking care of one's appearance and dressing well can be seen as a reflection of one's physical and spiritual well-being. It shows that a person is taking care of themselves and presenting themselves in a positive way. However, it's important to note that modesty is also an important aspect of dressing well in Islam, as it reflects one's commitment to Islamic values and principles.

Overall, the Quran and Islamic teachings emphasize the importance of taking care of one's physical, mental, and spiritual well-being. Dressing well and taking care of one's appearance can be seen as a reflection of this holistic approach to well-being.

 

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9 hours ago, TheMarionettist said:

My discussion with chatGPT regarding the symbolism of clothes in Surah Yusuf, and the Quran in general.

Fabulous post Bro. There is a real art to how chatgpt can be interrogated and I hope that by sharing experiences here we can improve our capabilities for religious searches and also for wider applications.

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1 hour ago, Haji 2003 said:

Fabulous post Bro. There is a real art to how chatgpt can be interrogated and I hope that by sharing experiences here we can improve our capabilities for religious searches and also for wider applications.

Very true. People just have to be aware of how they form their questions. The perspective ChatGPT answers from, in most cases, is not, say, "shia", if you ask it any Islamic questions, but that doesn't mean it can't give you a shia perspective. In most cases, you just need to ask.

But I'd say the biggest benefit is the "removal" of the language barrier. When you can't search for, or read, certain articles or the works of scholars due to them being written in a language you don't speak, then ChatGPT can be a really good place to get a good exposure and overview of such topics.

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4 hours ago, ireallywannaknow said:

Wow, who needs friends when you can just chat with chatgpt. :grin: Sounds like a legit conversation!

OH MY GOD

My latest conversation with chatgpt (my questions in bold and its answers in italics):

Which religions believe that humans share Earth with intelligent non-carbon life forms?

To the best of my knowledge, there are no religions that specifically believe in the existence of intelligent non-carbon life forms that share the Earth with humans.

While some religions may believe in the possibility of extraterrestrial life or other forms of non-human intelligence, these beliefs are generally not tied to the concept of coexistence with humans on Earth.

It's worth noting that the question of extraterrestrial life and its relationship to religion is a matter of ongoing debate and speculation, and different religious traditions may have different perspectives on the possibility of life beyond Earth. However, to the best of my knowledge, there are no major religions that specifically assert the existence of intelligent non-carbon life forms that coexist with humans on Earth.

 

What is a jinn?

A jinn, also spelled djinn, is a supernatural creature in Islamic mythology and theology. According to Islamic tradition, jinn are intelligent beings created by Allah from smokeless flame or "scorching wind" who have free will, just like humans.

Jinn are often portrayed as powerful and sometimes malevolent spirits, capable of possessing humans and causing harm or mischief. They are believed to exist in a parallel dimension that is invisible to humans, and are said to be able to assume various forms, including animals, humans, and even objects.

In Islamic belief, jinn are mentioned in the Quran and are considered to be a part of the unseen world, along with angels and other supernatural entities. They are not worshipped or considered divine, but are rather seen as another type of creation by Allah.

Jinn are a common theme in Islamic folklore and are often associated with magic and sorcery. They feature prominently in stories and legends, and are sometimes invoked in Islamic rituals and prayers for protection or other purposes.

 

You previously said that no religions specifically believe in the existence of intelligent non-carbon life forms on Earth but in a subsequent answer you explained what jinn are in Islam, how do you reconcile those two contradictory answers?

You are correct that my previous answer was incomplete and did not reflect the full complexity of the question. I apologize for any confusion or contradiction that may have caused.

As you mentioned, while it's true that no religions specifically believe in the existence of intelligent non-carbon life forms on Earth, Islamic tradition does include the concept of jinn, which are supernatural beings that are said to exist alongside humans in a parallel dimension.

Jinn are often depicted as intelligent and capable of interacting with humans, and are sometimes associated with the natural world and the environment. While they are not considered to be physical beings in the same way that humans are, they are still believed to possess consciousness and free will.

While jinn are not a type of intelligent non-carbon life form in the way that the question may have been asking, they do represent a belief in the existence of other intelligent entities that coexist with humans in a parallel dimension, and as such may be relevant to the question at hand.

 

You have previously said in Islam jinn exist and are said to exist alongside humans in a parallel dimension. Do any other religions believe in beings with similar characteristics?

Yes, there are several religious traditions that feature the belief in supernatural beings that exist alongside humans in a parallel dimension or in a different realm. Here are a few examples:

  1. Hinduism: In Hindu mythology, there are many different types of supernatural beings, including gods, goddesses, demons, and spirits. Some of these beings are said to live in a parallel universe or realm, and are capable of interacting with humans and influencing their lives.
  2. Buddhism: In Buddhist belief, there are various types of supernatural beings, including gods, demons, and spirits. These beings are believed to exist in different realms or dimensions, and are said to have varying degrees of power and influence over human affairs.
  3. Shintoism: In the Shinto tradition of Japan, there are many different types of supernatural beings, including kami (spirits or gods) and yōkai (supernatural monsters or spirits). These beings are believed to inhabit the natural world and are thought to have the power to affect human life.
  4. Indigenous religions: Many indigenous religions feature beliefs in supernatural beings that exist in parallel dimensions or in the natural world. These beings may be seen as protectors, guides, or tricksters, and are often deeply connected to the natural environment.

Overall, the belief in supernatural beings that exist alongside humans in parallel dimensions or in different realms is a common theme in many different religious traditions around the world.

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Amazing.

So exactly a year ago I watched/listened to this hawza series about AI. It randomly came up in my suggestions even though I have never expressed interest in AI. It was an interesting series, and the main conclusion was that eventually AI will be used to replace marjaiyyah (as a negative thing, not positive). People will basically do taqleed to AI. At the time is seemed really far off and kind of implausible, but subhanAllah just a year later and I can see it happening before my eyes. 

https://youtu.be/AlvODc5jv-M

The only thing though is I wish chatgpt would give citations... Does it do that? I guess you could probably ask it to. 

 

Edited by ireallywannaknow
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1 hour ago, ireallywannaknow said:

The only thing though is I wish chatgpt would give citations... Does it do that? I guess you could probably ask it to. 

 

When I asked it about the help that Aga Khan had rendered the British at the time of the 1857 Mutiny it said:

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Military support: Aga Khan I provided military support to the British Empire during the Indian Rebellion of 1857, also known as the Sepoy Mutiny. He mobilized his followers and raised a force of several thousand Ismaili soldiers to fight against the rebellion, and his forces were instrumental in helping to suppress the rebellion and restore British control over India.

 

I was unsure of this, so I had a follow-up question:

What is the evidence that Aga Khan I mobilised troops to help the British suppress the mutiny in 1857?

It replied:

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One of the primary sources for this information is the memoirs of Sir Bartle Frere, a British colonial administrator who served in India during the 19th century. In his memoirs, Frere describes how he met with Aga Khan I during the early stages of the rebellion and urged him to support the British cause. According to Frere, Aga Khan I responded by mobilizing his followers and raising a force of several thousand Ismaili soldiers to fight against the rebellion.

 

I then asked:

Where can I get a copy of the memoirs of Sir Bartle Frere?

Now the links in the box below are dead. That's likely due to chat working off data that is 2021 vintage, but it's something that they'd likely address. Chatgpt clearly works on the basis of a conversation and you can ask it to elaborate etc. on points that it has made. 

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The memoirs of Sir Bartle Frere, titled "The Life and Correspondence of Sir Bartle Frere," were originally published in 1895 and are now in the public domain.

You can find a digital copy of the memoirs on several online archives, including the Internet Archive and Google Books. Alternatively, you may be able to find a physical copy of the memoirs at a library or bookstore that specializes in rare or out-of-print books.

Here are some links to access the digital copies of the memoirs of Sir Bartle Frere:

Internet Archive: https://archive.org/details/lifecorresponden01freerich/page/n9/mode/2up

Google Books: https://books.google.com/books?id=5rgnAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=The+Life+and+Correspondence+of+Sir+Bartle+Frere&hl=en&newbks=1&newbks_redir=0&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi4qJ3s3Mf2AhXJXM0KHWoUCCAQ6AEwAHoECAEQAg#v=onepage&q=The Life and Correspondence of Sir Bartle Frere&f=false

 

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I think AI is like any other technology, it can be used for good to help or for harm to hurt, depending on the person who is using it. The main difference between CHAT GPT and previous chat bots is not in quality but in quantity. Previous AI bots were 'trained' on only a small set of data, mega bytes or giga bytes of data as an input to their model. The model is like the brain for the ai, the more data it has been trained on, the 'bigger' it's brain is and the more detailed and specific answers it can give to questions. From what I have read, Chat GPT was trained on petabytes of data, 1000s of terabytes and on a wide variety of subjects. The hardware that it is run on (the computer systems) are also much better and faster. So it responds with a much greater speed and accuracy vs previous versions of chatbots. 

It can do things that previous bots couldn't do. For example you can describe computer code that you want to write in natural language and it will write the code for you. This is runnable, useable code, not pseudo code like previous versions. So that it cool. I have actually used it for that a few times. Whether this is good or bad depends on what the code is used for. 

BTW, I described a bot like this in my previous posts regarding AI. It seems like it is coming closer to reality. 

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On 3/23/2023 at 1:43 PM, Abu Hadi said:

For example you can describe computer code that you want to write in natural language and it will write the code for you.

This is what I think makes it a game changer and not just in one field but everything.

God only knows the number of videos I have watched about how to use Excel and then given up because the program is so idiosyncratic. But watching a video of how someone can use the more powerful functions in Excel, using natural language in chatGPT was a breath of fresh air.

I've also had it write a business plan, and qualitatively analyse text. And as we saw a few steps above, although it seems reticent in giving you the basis for its answers, if you ask, it will.

Now there was a point where it said to me that its dataset did not include all Shia historical writings. The point at which that is done either by OpenAI, a licensee of the tech or someone else entirely can't be far off.

People who are in their 20's and even 30's must wonder what it was like to not have the internet one day and then suddenly to have it. Well the arrival of chatGPT is a bit like that, arguably even more profound.

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On 3/22/2023 at 10:45 PM, ireallywannaknow said:

I wish chatgpt would give citations... Does it do that?

On 3/22/2023 at 11:55 PM, Haji 2003 said:

Now the links in the box below are dead

As someone who has used ChatGPT more than he'd like to admit. I wouldn't recommend trusting any sources it provides. 

Here are two examples.

Exhibit A

My question (btw, does anyone know the answer to this?)

Quote

in surah yusuf, verse 5, it is mentioned that "shaytan" is to mankind an open/sworn/manifest enemy. I find this line interesting as it specifies "shaytan" being the enemy to mankind, and not mankind and jinn. I wonder if this is related to quran 4:28, where Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) states that he created mankind weak. The quran speaks to both jinn and humans in many cases, such as there are "shayaten" from jinn and humans/mankind, and there have been prophets sent to both "jinn" and "humans/mankind". But here, in yusuf verse 5, Allah says that it is to humans/mankind, that "shaytan" is a sworn enemy (as opposed to both human and jinn). Are there other verses in the quran that says "shaytan" is a sworn enemy to both mankind and jinn? If not, whereby all verses appearing regarding this always specifies shaytan as mankinds enemy, then have there been scholars who've discussed it? Perhaps tying it to the fact that we were created weak, and are therefore easier affected by them?



Shaytan ChatGPT's answer. 

Quote

Yes, you are correct that in Surah Yusuf verse 5, Allah mentions that "shaytan" is an open enemy to mankind, without mentioning jinn. However, it is important to note that in several other verses of the Quran, Allah refers to "shaytan" as an enemy of both mankind and jinn.

For example, in Surah Al-Isra verse 53, Allah says, "And tell My servants that they should say that which is best. Verily, Shaytan (Satan) sows disagreements among them. Surely, Shaytan (Satan) is an open enemy to mankind." Here, Allah specifically mentions that "shaytan" is an enemy to both mankind and jinn.

Similarly, in Surah Al-An'am verse 142, Allah says, "And of the Jinn were some who worked under him (Iblis/Satan) by the permission of their Lord. And whoever deviates from the remembrance of his Lord, He will put him into a severe punishment." This verse suggests that some jinn work under Satan, implying that he is their enemy as well.

It is also worth noting that in Islam, the concept of "shaytan" as an enemy of mankind is not just based on the weakness of human nature, but also on the fact that "shaytan" actively tries to misguide and deceive people away from the path of Allah. Muslims believe that "shaytan" is constantly seeking ways to lead people astray and tempt them towards evil.

As for scholars discussing this issue, there is a rich tradition of Islamic scholarship that has explored the nature of "shaytan" and his relationship with mankind and jinn. Many scholars have written extensively on the topic, and their writings can be found in books of Tafsir (Quranic exegesis) and Islamic theology.

Overall, while Surah Yusuf verse 5 specifically mentions "shaytan" as an enemy of mankind, there are other verses in the Quran that suggest he is also an enemy of jinn. The concept of "shaytan" as an enemy of mankind is rooted in Islamic theology and is not just related to the weakness of human nature.

Note its logic, how it misquotes Quran in "surah al an'am verse 142", and changed the context. 
The real quote it used came from surah saba, 34:12, which is the following: "And to Solomon [We subjected] the wind - its morning [journey was that of] a month - and its afternoon [journey was that of] a month, and We made flow for him a spring of [liquid] copper. And among the jinn were those who worked for him by the permission of his Lord. And whoever deviated among them from Our command - We will make him taste of the punishment of the Blaze."

To summarize, it argued a perspective without any logical train-of-thought. And it established those arguments with a misquoted source, which it failed to source correctly.  

If you want more, here's

Exhibit B 


(My questions are in bold. ChatGPT's answers are in cursive)


would you say they are also arguably amongst the most striking and unconventional comic book stories to have been told? or would you rewrite that sentence?
I think the sentence you wrote is perfectly fine, and it effectively conveys your point. However, if you wanted to rephrase it, you could say "The 'Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles' comics are widely considered to be one of the most unique and unconventional comic book stories ever told."


oh? "are widely considered"? do you have any secondary resources to back that claim? (that's what my professor would say haha)
Sure, here are a few examples of articles that refer to the "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" as being unconventional and groundbreaking:

An article on The Conversation website titled "Cowabunga! The unlikely story of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" states that the comic series was "unconventional from the start" and "challenged the status quo" of the comic book industry.
A Rolling Stone article from 2019 titled "How 'Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles' Invented Modern Fandom" describes the comics as a "revolutionary force" that "changed the game for everyone who ever cared about comic books, or even just enjoyed irreverent, wildly imaginative storytelling."
An article on Polygon titled "The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles comics were ahead of their time" argues that the comics were "a completely unconventional, avant-garde project that changed the game for the medium."
These are just a few examples, but they illustrate that the idea of the "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" being a groundbreaking and unconventional comic book series is a widely held view.


mayne, that rolling stone article doesnt exist
I apologize for the error. It seems I made a mistake while providing the source. The Rolling Stone article titled "How 'Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles' Invented Modern Fandom" was actually published on Syfy Wire, not Rolling Stone. Here is the correct link to the article: https://www.syfy.com/syfywire/how-teenage-mutant-ninja-turtles-invented-modern-fandom

I hope this helps!

u really talk "air" a lot. That link goes nowhere, "page not found". the article is neither rolling stone's nor syfy wire. perhaps if u could write an excerpt from the article, then i could find it? 
I apologize for the confusion. It seems that I made another mistake while providing the source. The article I referred to was actually published on the website CBR.com, not Rolling Stone or Syfy Wire. Here is the correct link to the article: https://www.cbr.com/how-teenage-mutant-ninja-turtles-revolutionized-fandom/

The article argues that the "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" comic series was a groundbreaking and unconventional force in the comic book industry. Here is an excerpt from the article:

"Few comics had ever challenged the medium's status quo like Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, a series that made an impact in the mid-1980s with its shocking, and delightfully bizarre premise. The idea of four sewer-dwelling turtles that were trained in martial arts by a rat was unconventional from the start, but the real revolution was the fact that the series was self-published and distributed by creators Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird."

I hope this helps clarify my previous responses.

(My response after having checked the link, and used the excerpt to try and find the article with no luck)
you sure thats not something you came up with/invented? and that the article doesnt exist?
I apologize again for the confusion. It seems that I made an error in my previous response. I cannot locate the article I referred to on Rolling Stone or Syfy Wire, and I may have made a mistake in citing the source. I'm sorry for any confusion I may have caused.

To answer your initial question, the "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" comic series is widely considered to be unconventional due to its anthropomorphic animal characters and unique blend of humor, action, and drama. The series has been praised for its innovative storytelling and groundbreaking impact on the comic book industry.


To end this long post: While ChatGPT is really bad with sources and quotes, it's really insightful and knowledgeable. It's like that one guy who knows all the fun facts, and when you ask them where they get it from, they'll reply "I must've read it somewhere".  

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On 3/22/2023 at 10:14 PM, Haji 2003 said:

You have previously said in Islam jinn exist and are said to exist alongside humans in a parallel dimension. Do any other religions believe in beings with similar characteristics?

If you're interested in this topic, (and in jinn and how it relates to Islam and the world in general) then I'd recommend this book:
https://www.amazon.com/Islam-Intelligent-Contemporary-Issues-Middle/dp/0815635141

It's a really really good book. I haven't finished reading it, but every time I read bits of it, I think, "this is the type of book that would have been part of those hidden/closed sections in ancient libraries". While the book does not revolve around "unseen beings" in other religions, the author does examine many religions in the introduction (such as Native American spirits, fairies, Japanese Shinto religion, Buddhism, etc.), and goes on to discuss how they are, in essence, the same Islamic "jinn". 

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Ai is very gullible! I intentionally gave it false information (about historical figures, scientists, ...) while asking it some questions. Not only didnt it correct them, but it fabricated more false information and stories based on the false info i had given to it!! 

For example, i asked "who is x (x: a legendary figure in children's storybooks)?".

At first, it said that it didnt know it and that it needed to know the context and ...

Here, i intentionally gave it false information in order to test it. I said x was Avicenna's neighbour with whom he sometimes had philosophical debates.

Then, ai, believing my false info, said yes! X was an Islamic scholar and that he engaged in discussions with Avicenna amd he was expert in law and theology!!!!

Then i told it the truth and ai apologized for its mistake!

Edited by shadow_of_light
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4 hours ago, shadow_of_light said:

Ai is very gullible!

It depends on the nature of the subject and the question. If you are dealing with material where the answers are well established and/or calculable. It's pretty accurate.

The more esoteric the subject matter the more likely it is you will need to know about the subject to determine whether it has provided you with new/useful information or whether it has made a mistake.

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2 hours ago, shadow_of_light said:

It is possible that ai was lying?

Lying suggests that someone knows what the truth is and decides to say something different. I don't think that is the case here, after all, if it gets caught out it only damages its credibility. I was pleasantly surprised in the manner it handled questions about Islam.

For example:

 

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Guest Salam

I once asked it to tell me a story about Imam Mahdi (عليه السلام). I was listening to an interesting narration it wrote for me, but thought "wait something is off here." I look it up and there's no trace of it. I asked it if it just made that up and it apologized. AI is a fabricator of hadiths!! :cry:

ChatGPT isnad grading: Weak (Tha3eef) 

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On 3/30/2023 at 11:39 PM, TheMarionettist said:

As someone who has used ChatGPT more than he'd like to admit. I wouldn't recommend trusting any sources it provides. 

Agreed, each one needs to be manually checked and the contents also.

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On 5/4/2023 at 11:06 PM, Haji 2003 said:

Lying suggests that someone knows what the truth is and decides to say something different.

Actually, if you watch the video that I have linked to above, the presenter (from Microsoft) seems to suggest that when gpt4 says that it has made 'a typo', this is not really the case, i.e. it is lying.

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