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Mahsa Amini, 22-year old Iranian, dies after morality police arrest

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21 hours ago, hamz786 said:

Personally, I do feel the government should've handled this better than what they have. Also, I don't see it as the only reason but do you really believe Israel/ the U.S and whoever else, is not frothing at the mouth regarding what is happening?

On social media right now there is enough anti-Iran, anti-Islamic rhetoric that I would be surprised if Iran's opposition is not fueling the flame

How so?

In how many riots, where the rioters are in hundreds (not in thousands or hundred of thousands) and yet you find almost 30 causalities of law enforcement officers? 
 

This was a blatant act of sedition and chaos, and nothing else. Even those who were running the show knew that it won’t break the IRI regime. They just live on fitna, bloodshed, and suffering. It’s a sick and sadistic mindset that is prevalent among the children of Satan and Marwan, and as time is passing by, we are seeing their alliance is coming to light for all to see. The next big addition to this would be the Cow worshipers. 
 

Like someone suggested above, it’s about the time Shia Muslims and sincere Christians start making their bonds stronger. Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) has already made it incumbent in Quran. 

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Posted (edited)
On 10/3/2022 at 8:42 AM, shadow_of_light said:

They are not punished. They even at least say something like "i apologize for my children's mistakes. I dont approve of their deeds". They ignore people's feelings. If they were more intelligent, they would realize that behaving like that, instead of denying or justifying or ignoring and remaining silent, would be of benefit to themselves.

Fatemeh Larijani has/ had h1b visa. His father is the former speaker of the parliament.

H1b is not residency or citizenship. H1b means you can come to the US for a short amount of time to do some work. A company or organization sponsors you and you do your work, and then your visa expires and you are supposed to leave at that point. It is given for a few month to 1 year, typically. 

I don't see why they should apologize for their kids mistakes. As a parent of three children, I can say that we (as parents) do our best to raise our children, teach them Islam, teach them good values, and try to be an example for them of these. What they do once they become an adult is outside of the parents control. If at that point they do wrong things and mistakes, they will bear the consequences of those and they will be responsible for those, not the parents, unless the parents had a partnership with them in these deeds by encouraging them to do the deeds or facilitating these deeds. If there is no evidence that the parents did this, we can't assume they did. 

The root of the issue is the injustice that prevails all over the world in relation to wealth and economic status. We live in a world where the wealthy are given way beyond what they need or could possibly use and the poor are given nothing and what little they have is taken away thru corruption and injustice. I believe that the leadership of Iran is sincere in trying to take measures to curb or alleviate that injustice that is prevalent. At the same time, Iran is part of a global system which no country can escape from. It is that global system, based on riba and vampire capitalism that is the root of the problem and the root of 99% of the problems we have in the world today. This is the system that Imam Zaman(a.f.s) will destroy and pull it out by it's roots. May Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) hasten his return. 

Edited by Abu Hadi
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Posted (edited)
On 10/4/2022 at 1:09 AM, hamz786 said:

Personally, I do feel the government should've handled this better than what they have. Also, I don't see it as the only reason but do you really believe Israel/ the U.S and whoever else, is not frothing at the mouth regarding what is happening?

On social media right now there is enough anti-Iran, anti-Islamic rhetoric that I would be surprised if Iran's opposition is not fueling the flame

Sure they are. That's why they're called adversaries.

My argument isn't "who is adding fuel to the flame?", it is "is there a pre-existing flame?" 

Unfortunately, that's what people seem to be very enthusiastically trying to sweep under the rug. And this sort of oh-I-don't-know-it-must-be-Israel rhetoric, coming from the Ayatullah, is quite callow to say the least. Violent behavior keeps erupting time and time again because there is a very obvious problem in Iran. And it's cancerous. Others will take advantage of it too. The more you try to turn a blind eye to it, the more it'll grow. 

Edited by khizarr
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1 hour ago, khizarr said:

Sure they are. That's why they're called adversaries.

My argument isn't "who is adding fuel to the flame?", it is "is there a pre-existing flame?" 

Unfortunately, that's what people seem to be very enthusiastically trying to sweep under the rug. And this sort of oh-I-don't-know-it-must-be-Israel rhetoric, coming from the Ayatullah, is quite callow to say the least. Violent behavior keeps erupting time and time again because there is a very obvious problem in Iran. And it's cancerous. Others will take advantage of it too. The more you try to turn a blind eye to it, the more it'll grow. 

It's like I'm listening to a CNN contributor who is an "expert" on Iran.

You can't make this up!

Please mods check the IP addresses of Khizarr and Khadhem, my gut says they are the same person.

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33 minutes ago, Laayla said:

Please mods check the IP addresses of Khizarr and Khadhem, my gut says they are the same person.

Yes, mods, get to work! And once you find out that we are two different people with two different IP addresses, please let our friend Layla know. Her guts are very concerned. 

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15 hours ago, Eddie Mecca said:

'If I was an Iranian' George Galloway (1 min 30 sec)

 

 

Meh. I’m of two minds about this. In principle, I don’t disagree with him. It will ultimately be best if whatever happens is driven by the Iranian people themselves.

On the other hand, it’s also kind of a naïve statement in that the Iranian system is systematically designed to block any and all routes for the people to push within the system for any change that the people in charge don’t approve of. There is literally a veto at every imaginable level by a layer of insiders with no direct accountability to the people. 

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Can some one provide a brief info on what's happening? and what the government has done in regard to this case?

Has things been settled yet or still on going?

when will internet connection be restored in Iran.

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9 hours ago, Meedy said:

Can some one provide a brief info on what's happening?

On the 13th of September, a 22-year-old Kurdish Iranian woman, Mahsa Amini, was arrested for not properly adhering to the shari3i dress code. (Her pants were too tight and I'm pretty sure a bit of her ankles were showing).

She died three days later in police custody.

As soon as Iranian President Ebrahim Raeisi heard that Ms Amini had died, he ordered an investigation into the incident. 

Western media outlets all jumped on the case and came to the conclusion (rather, lied) that Mahsa Amini was beaten to death by the Iranian morality police. These reports came out before any evidence or investigation, they just assumed (again, lied would be a better word) that Ms Amini was beaten.

On the other hand, CCTV footage shows that Ms Amini fainted and collapsed while in police custody. Not a hand was laid on her, and it was pretty clear that she wasn't hurt or injured before she fainted.

She was then pronounced dead and the hospital. Top-ranking doctors have said that there is no evidence that she was beaten, and there were no bruises on her body.

Iranian police say she died of cardiac arrest.

As soon as Mahsa Amini died, thousands of Iranians took to the streets and started violent riots against the government and the Islamic Revolution. They started burning mosques, police cars, Qurans, flags, and even people. Some hijabi women were even harassed by the protesters. They were shouting slogans such as "death to the dictator" and "down with the Islamic Revolution".

In response, the Iranian government shut down the internet to prevent (or slow) the organisation of any further riots. 

One thing you won't hear from the Western media outlets is that thousands of Iranians rallied in various cities all across Iran to condemn the violence of the rioters. 

Recently, the Leader, Imam Ali Khamenei, also condemned the riots and labelled them as the work of the US and Israel

Mahsa Amini's father also said that her family are 'disgruntled' by the protests, and that they were 'not for [their] sake'.

Quote

The father of Amini explained that the family's only desire was to deal with and "punish" anyone who could have been a reason for his daughter's death.

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22 hours ago, Muhammed Ali said:

A video by Max Blumenthal. It's really worth watching.

 

This is good analysis. It shows that majority of Iranians do not want to have regime change. There are those who want to remove morality police but also those who do not want to remove it but change it to be more lenient. As for hijab it seems that those parts in Iran that are more moderate want to have freedom to choose to wear the hijab, this is similar in Baghdad. In the end it is the Iranians to choose what is best for them and not others countries to interfere. And it is only minority that use this protest to serve other countries interest to regime change.

 

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^ C’est un peu tiré par les cheveux mais qui cherche, trouve toujours une occasion pour allumer la mèche !

It's a bit far fetched but who seeks, always finds an opportunity to light the fuse! 

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Why are all Iranian Footballers protesting against the govt 

Even the ones who aren't playing for national team and are relatively unknown are very vocal against the govt. 

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11 hours ago, Hassu93 said:

Why are all Iranian Footballers protesting against the govt 

Even the ones who aren't playing for national team and are relatively unknown are very vocal against the govt. 

Because some revolutionaries criticized them so now they are upset and this is their way of "protesting"

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Mahsa Amini's cause of death revealed: No blow to head, limbs

An Iranian coroner's report says Mahsa Amini's death was caused by multiple organ failure caused by cerebral hypoxia, i.e. lack of oxygen to the brain.

Quote

An Iranian coroner's report into the death of Mahsa Amini found that the Iranian woman's death was "not caused by blow to the head and limbs," IRNA reported on Friday.

In a statement, the coroner's report indicated that Amini's death was caused by multiple organ failure caused by cerebral hypoxia, or lack of oxygen to the brain.

According to the report, Amini underwent brain surgery at the Milad Hospital in Tehran when she was eight years old.

The deceased suffered from an imbalance in the hypothalamus gland after her operation, so she was under medical treatment since then.

The Iranian expert concluded that on September 13, at 07:56 pm, Amini lost consciousness, and due to her previous illness, she suffered from extremely low blood pressure.

"Due to the ineffective cardio-respiratory resuscitation in the first critical minutes, she suffered severe hypoxia and as a result brain damage despite recovery from cardiac functioning," the report explained.

"She died due to multiple organ failure caused by cerebral hypoxia," it indicated.

https://english.almayadeen.net/news/politics/mahsa-aminis-cause-of-death-revealed:-no-blow-to-head-limbs

IRNA article

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4 hours ago, -Rejector- said:

An Iranian coroner's report says Mahsa Amini's death was caused by multiple organ failure caused by cerebral hypoxia, i.e. lack of oxygen to the brain.

And this is being reported by.. the Islamic Republic News Agency? Lol.

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Cultural War Being Waged By The West In Iran Eisa Ali & George Galloway (9 min) 

 

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Posted (edited)
15 hours ago, khizarr said:
16 hours ago, -Rejector- said:

 

And this is being reported by.. the Islamic Republic News Agency? Lol.

its being reported by many news agencies in Iran. 

also almayadeen is reporting it.

Mahsa Amini did not die from blows to body, Iranian coroner says amid widespread protests (nbcnews.com)

western sources are also reporting it

I think you should withdraw some of the statements you made, and admit that you were wrong at least about the death of Mahsa Amini.

Edited by VoidVortex
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4 hours ago, VoidVortex said:

its being reported by many news agencies in Iran. 

And these "news agencies" are state controlled, yes?

4 hours ago, VoidVortex said:

western sources are also reporting it

Western sources are reporting the findings of the Iranian Legal Medical Organization, which itself is part of the Iranian judiciary, as highlighed in the link from NBC you shared.

Do better.

4 hours ago, VoidVortex said:

I think you should withdraw some of the statements you made, and admit that you were wrong at least about the death of Mahsa Amini.

I wish I could. I wish I could turn a blind eye to the pattern of brutality that is carried out by this regime, like a lot of you do. I wish I could look at this country and see them taking responsibility for their problems.

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7 hours ago, Abu Hadi said:

This is the main issue. The anti Iranian Govt. side doesn't trust any news that comes from official Iranian sources, and the Pro Govt. side doesn't trust anything that comes from the Western Media. 

So what is actually the point of this thread ? 

As for me,  I would trust something that comes from the Western Media, so long as it could be objectively verified, or attested to, by objective / disinterested sources. The problem is , at least in the current political climate, I don't know if there are any objective / disinterested sources. 

You're not entirely wrong. 
 

Though, I do think this government could probably handle these things a little but more maturely. It might lend them some credibility for next time. Civilized governments of civilized countries don't give this much power to their police institutions, use tear gas on protestors for removing their hijab, shut down the internet, and go on stage to talk against a country sitting over a thousand miles away when there's over a hundred people dead on their own soil. 

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21 minutes ago, khizarr said:

And these "news agencies" are state controlled, yes?

Western sources are reporting the findings of the Iranian Legal Medical Organization, which itself is part of the Iranian judiciary, as highlighed in the link from NBC you shared.

Do better.

I wish I could. I wish I could turn a blind eye to the pattern of brutality that is carried out by this regime, like a lot of you do. I wish I could look at this country and see them taking responsibility for their problems.

I don't think we can ever get any certainty knowledge about her death. This means both of the groups need to be silent and not blame anyone here. Rather this issue about hijab and morality police in Iran need to be solved because Iranian people are raising their voice over it. 

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9 minutes ago, shadow_of_light said:

This is exaggeration. The majority of protestors dont behave like that.

I don't believe that is being attributed to the majority, it is just a statement of fact.

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2 hours ago, khizarr said:

And these "news agencies" are state controlled, yes?

Since when was Al Mayadeen state controlled :hahaha:

2 hours ago, khizarr said:

I wish I could. I wish I could turn a blind eye to the pattern of brutality that is carried out by this regime, like a lot of you do. I wish I could look at this country and see them taking responsibility for their problems.

Right. Because a woman fainting on camera is the entire "regime's" fault. 

2 hours ago, khizarr said:

use tear gas on protestors for removing their hijab

** for burning banks, police stations, ambulances, mosques, Qurans, hijabs...shouting 'death to the dictator' and 'down with the revolution'...harassing hijabi women, attacking innocent civilians...I think you missed a bit there, bud. 

2 hours ago, khizarr said:

shut down the internet

You mean the Western-funded imperialistic pro-Satan anti-Islamic internet? Hmm, I wonder why.

2 hours ago, khizarr said:

and go on stage to talk against a country sitting over a thousand miles away

That 'country sitting over a thousand miles away' has this as a part of their policy?

Quote

[T]he United States should encourage the Iranian people to take power in their own name, and that this would be the most legitimate method of regime change.

And this?

Quote

The true objective of this policy option is to overthrow the clerical regime in Tehran and see it replaced, hopefully, by one whose views would be more compatible with U.S. interests in the region.

And this?

Quote

The United States could play multiple roles in facilitating a revolution. By funding and helping organize domestic rivals of the regime, the United States could create an alternative leadership to seize power. As Raymond Tanter of the Iran Policy Committee argues, students and other groups “need covert backing for their demonstrations. They need fax machines. They need Internet access, funds to duplicate materials, and funds to keep vigilantes from beating them up.” Beyond this, U.S.-backed media outlets could highlight regime shortcomings and make otherwise obscure critics more prominent.

 

31 minutes ago, shadow_of_light said:

This is exaggeration. The majority of protestors dont behave like that.

 

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, khizarr said:

Western sources are reporting the findings of the Iranian Legal Medical Organization, which itself is part of the Iranian judiciary, as highlighed in the link from NBC you shared.

Do better

do you not trust the Iranian Legal Medical Organisation. I actually understand why you may not, however I don't think Iran gains much from lying and therefore I don't think they are lying at all. The riots have already happened, many have already been killed. Raeisi made a pledge to bring the killer to justice so Iran would should show in this manner a condemnation of this action. In this way, no one has a right to say the regime needs to change as Iran is not complicit as a state with this action(even though it didn't happen) but it condemned the action and even would have sought justice for it. 

Edited by VoidVortex
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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, -Rejector- said:

Since when was Al Mayadeen state controlled 

Comrade, don't try to be so smart. If you scroll up, you can see exactly what I was replying to. You said "many news agencies in Iran", and to that I replied saying that many of these Iranian news agencies are controlled by the state. If you want to deny that fact, that's your problem.

As for al-Mayadeen, it isn't Iranian, so I'm not sure why you would even include that as an example. It's based in Lebanon and has a history of being affiliated with Hezbollah, the Syrian dictator, and the Iranian regime. The channel hasn't even disclosed which person(s) own it. If that isn't a red flag for you, then I don't know what to say.

2 hours ago, -Rejector- said:

for burning banks, police stations, ambulances, mosques, Qurans, hijabs...shouting 'death to the dictator' and 'down with the revolution'...harassing hijabi women, attacking innocent civilians...I think you missed a bit there, bud. 

That's how human societies are. You provoke them, and you've just dug yourself into a hole.

(As a side note for others: a lot of this information above is exaggerated or simply not true at all)

2 hours ago, -Rejector- said:

You mean the Western-funded imperialistic pro-Satan anti-Islamic internet? Hmm, I wonder why.

No, the internet that's supposed to be used for communication purposes, businesses, transactions, transportation, emergencies, to study, and, for some people, it is a means to earn a living. Ooh, so "satanic". 

Besides, such a righteous government surely should have been able to withstand information on social media and tackle it instead of shutting the whole system down out of cowardice and become a laughing stock in front of the world, no?

Sending across such a powerful image of Islam, masha'allah.

2 hours ago, -Rejector- said:

That 'country sitting over a thousand miles away' has this as a part of their policy?

No, these are quotes from a book by the name of, 'Which Path to Persia?: Options for a New American Strategy toward Iran'. 

The authors of this book are a mix of intelligence officers, analysts, and foreign relations experts. They penned a book on the different policy options that are at the disposal of the United States to engage with Iran - including military action, diplomacy, containment, and more. Every country has a think tank, and they are allowed to discuss different options of dealing with countries that pose a risk to their national security. I'm not sure why this is making you so salty.

Edited by khizarr
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America and Israel are pointing fingers at Iran, its very ironic and hypocritical. Not only that but the statements of Israeli women in "support" of Iranian women are at a different level of cringe, considering the IDFs brutality against palestinian women which is very common. The IDF is also very good at killing innocent palestinian men, but I haven't people crying over regime change. At most people say let there be peace and a two state solution. America's police brutality is very well known, and at the peak of it, when the George Floyd protests were happening, to my knowledge I didn't see calls of regime change and a societal revolution. 

One allegation and pandemomium happened in Iran. Now this allegation has been proven false by the coroner's report. Now unfortunately the tragic death of another girl called Nika is being taken advantage of. I've seen the most ridiculous allegations such as she was raped and her organs harvested. Its very insulting to Nika's memory for some individuals to make up these things about her death. The narrative seems to change constantly and even that traitorous waste of flesh Masih Alinejad seems to change her narrative too. 

Israel and America have done really well in terms of their disinformation campaigns. They have fooled a lot of people, including some of the shia. Even a few of my relatives have fallen for it. 

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9 hours ago, khizarr said:

Civilized governments of civilized countries

Belittling and disparaging a poor marginalized nation which is singlehandedly attempting to oppose the imperialist project of a superpower in MENA isn't an attractive quality. 

On 10/7/2022 at 5:41 PM, khizarr said:

And this is being reported by.. the Islamic Republic News Agency? Lol.

Your point is mute because in a corporatist form of governance, where conglomerates can and do dictate foreign policy, and where no distinct line exists separating corporate/financial power from state power, then corporate media is state media (5 corporations control roughly 90% of the press). 

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9 hours ago, khizarr said:

Civilized governments of civilized countries

Internalized oppression or self-hatred is often an outgrowth of an internalized colonialism and it can manifest itself in a variety of ways. One way is by adopting an exaggerated conformity to the popular, centralized norms of the host country (or dominant group). Members of powerless or excluded groups may have an oppressive view of their own group, strongly assert negative self-stereotypes and seek to mimic characteristics of the highly-valued group.

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This video is excellent. He points out how this CIA-backed colour revolution attempt coincided with Iran giving shahed planes to Russia, Iran joining the SCO (Shanghai Cooperation Organisation), and Iran applying for BRICS membership.

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2 hours ago, Haji 2003 said:

 

You want to post something brother? I can’t see anything 

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