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In the Name of God بسم الله

Do you feel gratitude towards your host country?

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This question is mainly directed towards muslims who either immigrated to the west or were born in the west. Do you feel gratitude for the country taking you in? For a long time, I've seen many muslims in the west who on one hand, complains about how bad and racist the west is and just says all sorts of bad things about it. And yet, many of those same people often cheats huge sums of government welfare and in many cases, living completely off of government welfare. I often also see muslim youth engaging in criminal activity and portraying themselves as victims of racism.

Now, it is true that muslims face discrimination. Especially in countries like France. Them supporting zionism doesn't make it any better. On the other hand though, if the west hadn't taken me and my family in, I dare not think how life would've been like. Doubly so because of the hostility that we shias face in many muslim countries. The discrimination Shias face in muslim countries are far worse than in the west. A lot of muslim migrants in the west doesn't forgets that the rights and opportunities that they enjoy, is something that people in their original countries can only dream of. Not all muslim migrants are like that of course. But a considerable portion of muslim migrants lives off welfare while at the same time says all sorts of bad things about their host countries.

But what do you think? Do you feel gratitude? Or what do you feel towards your host country?

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Salam

I live in Australia. I wouldn't call it 'gratitude', just because Australia has been involved in Afghanistan and Iraq and we're pretty much a puppet of the US. 

That being said, I do however like that in Australia I'm not at risk of being killed because of my religion. At least there's freedom of belief here. They call it 'secularism'. But then again, 'secularism' has its problems as well. For example, now there's a rise in the LGBTQIABCDEFG++++++++ agenda. There are nightclubs, there's music at shopping centres, alcohol normalisation, easy access gambling...the West has its own issues.

But back to the question, overall, I am grateful to live in the West rather than Lebanon or another country which puts Shia at risk. 

May Allah bless you and your family. 

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4 hours ago, notme said:

No. 

The country didn't do anything to earn me. I just happened to be born here.

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12 hours ago, -Rejector- said:

Salam

I live in Australia. I wouldn't call it 'gratitude', just because Australia has been involved in Afghanistan and Iraq and we're pretty much a puppet of the US. 

That being said, I do however like that in Australia I'm not at risk of being killed because of my religion. At least there's freedom of belief here. They call it 'secularism'. But then again, 'secularism' has its problems as well. For example, now there's a rise in the LGBTQIABCDEFG++++++++ agenda. There are nightclubs, there's music at shopping centres, alcohol normalisation, easy access gambling...the West has its own issues.

But back to the question, overall, I am grateful to live in the West rather than Lebanon or another country which puts Shia at risk. 

May Allah bless you and your family. 

Are shias in Lebanon at risk? Isn't Hezbollah completely dominating Lebanon? I thought shias enjoy benefits there

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Yes. 

You've painted a false dichotomy. I can both appreciate my host country and think it is racist. 

As a citizen of this country, I will actively put effort to make it better, less racist, more fair and etc. 

At times, things could be frustrating, considering the abhorrent foreign policies of most Western countries; but as bad as it can get here, I'd rather live here than a muslim-majority country, or any other country for that matter. 

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Posted (edited)
On 6/27/2022 at 7:33 PM, Dubilex said:

This question is mainly directed towards muslims who either immigrated to the west or were born in the west. Do you feel gratitude for the country taking you in? For a long time, I've seen many muslims in the west who on one hand, complains about how bad and racist the west is and just says all sorts of bad things about it. And yet, many of those same people often cheats huge sums of government welfare and in many cases, living completely off of government welfare. I often also see muslim youth engaging in criminal activity and portraying themselves as victims of racism.

Now, it is true that muslims face discrimination. Especially in countries like France. Them supporting zionism doesn't make it any better. On the other hand though, if the west hadn't taken me and my family in, I dare not think how life would've been like. Doubly so because of the hostility that we shias face in many muslim countries. The discrimination Shias face in muslim countries are far worse than in the west. A lot of muslim migrants in the west doesn't forgets that the rights and opportunities that they enjoy, is something that people in their original countries can only dream of. Not all muslim migrants are like that of course. But a considerable portion of muslim migrants lives off welfare while at the same time says all sorts of bad things about their host countries.

But what do you think? Do you feel gratitude? Or what do you feel towards your host country?

I am a revert to Islam, born in the U.S., but I can give an answer. I think this is a good question, btw. 

It is a clear teaching of Ahl Al Bayt((عليه السلام)) that first and foremost, we should be thankful to Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) for any blessing we get in this life, as Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) is the source of these blessings. Most muslims already know this, so I won't belabour this point. In conjunction with this, it is also a clear teaching that we should be grateful to anyone who helps us, and this is a sign for gratitude to Allah((عليه السلام)) as we are recognizing the mechanism (a person in most cases) whom Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) has used as the vehicle for this blessing to reach us. This is why we are thankful to Ahl Al Bayt((عليه السلام)), and we praise them, but we don't worship them. It is because we recognize them as the vehicle thru which the guidance of Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) reaches us, but they are not the source of it. 

If a particular immigration officer or a particular U.S. Embassy or Consulate helped your family by giving you an opportunity for a better life, you should be thankful to them for that. At the same time, this doesn't make them immune from criticism if they did something wrong to you or someone else. The U.S. government (and other Western Governments) do some good in the world, they also do bad things. So our duty is to recognize the good they do, and also 'call them out' on the bad things they do. This is not being ungrateful, this is doing our duty under 'Amr bil Maroof wa Nahiya Al Munkhar'. Part of that duty is recognizing when others, not just muslims, do 'Maroof' (i.e. good things) and by recognizing it, we promote this and wish it to continue. At the same time, when they do 'Munkhar' (i.e. bad things) we should not then hesitate from recognizing what they are doing is bad. 'Amr bil Maroof wa Nahiya Al Munkhar' starts with ones own self. If you can recognize your own good deeds and criticize and forbid yourself from bad deeds, you can extend this out to others. Noone is immune from criticism for their bad deeds, just as you yourself and me myself are not immune, no matter how much good we have done. We are all in the same boat, as they say. 

In fact, you can tell a good person from a bad person in this way. A good person may be initially a little annoyed or upset when they are criticized for a bad deed, but after that initial emotional response (which is inherent in all of us) they will actually think and consider whether they have done something wrong, and if they did, try to change that behaviour. A bad person may not give a negative response initially ( because they are trying to hide this emotion), but they will also not consider any type of criticism of themselves as legitimate, and will not attempt to change. They will, after that, view that person who criticised them as an enemy who is trying to harm them, and they will act accordingly. This is the difference between good and bad people. It is the same with governments, because what are governments except a group of people who somehow got power.  

The other difference between good and bad people is good people are the first to criticize themselves when they recognize they have done something bad. They are constantly evaluating their own behaviour to see if it is good or bad. They do this, usually, before other people do it. When a bad thing happens to them, they will first look at their own behaviour to see if it was their own bad behaviour which cause this tragedy to happen to them. It is only when they are sure that it wasn't their own behaviour, that they will start to look at the behaviour of others as a possible cause. Bad people never look at or consider their own behaviour, whether it is good or bad. They will give an excuse, or say 'Well this is just the way I am', which is the weakest of excuses. Also, bad people will never blame themselves for bad things that happen to them, they will always blame others. 

 

Edited by Abu Hadi
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Posted (edited)

Wonderful question. 
I would´ve loved to share my views, had I been born in a Western country or immigrated to one. 
I often wonder if people in the West would prefer to immigrate to more Islamic countries. 

Edited by Traveller_
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I dont have a 'back home' country as I and my ancestors were born in the West. But I am a bit surprised at the responses given thus far from those that say they enjoy living in a secular society. Does this mean you would rather Imam Mahdi (عجّل الله تعالى فرجه الشريف) not come and establish an Islamic government the world over? In my view, God created this world and universe to be in line with Islam. Thus the only harmony will be when the whole world is under Islamic rule by a just leader. But if we get too comfortable with secularism, wouldn't we naturally rebel against his (عجّل الله تعالى فرجه الشريف) return? Obviously I enjoy some perks for living in this country I guess (?) but this country is evil built on evil and I'm not comfortable or grateful for that. 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Guest Guest said:

Does this mean you would rather Imam Mahdi (عجّل الله تعالى فرجه الشريف) not come and establish an Islamic government the world over? 

That's not what it means. The best and most direct way to get close to Imam(a.f.s) is by being a good muslim. This means following the teachings of Ahl Al Bayt((عليه السلام)). That means being grateful when it is appropriate. You can be grateful to someone without making them your Wali and/or your Imam. 

Edited by Abu Hadi
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7 hours ago, Traveller_ said:

Wonderful question. 
I would´ve loved to share my views, had I been born in a Western country or immigrated to one. 
I often wonder if people in the West would prefer to immigrate to more Islamic countries. 

Certainly, I prefer to live in the West. Although, with the way things are going, with LGBTQ indoctrination in schools and the increasing decadence in society, I'm not sure I'd wanna raise a kid here. If I marry and have kids, I would definitely see what options there are to give my children a muslim upbringing, protected from the current degeneracy plaguing the west. Which is a shame, I actually think the western civilization has a lot of good things and has contributed some really good things to the world.

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On 6/27/2022 at 6:33 PM, Dubilex said:

what do you feel towards your host country?

I feel sorry for everyone who came to the West/US from their home country. Not only you separated from people you love but you sometimes endure discrimination.

6 hours ago, Traveller_ said:

I often wonder if people in the West would prefer to immigrate to more Islamic countries. 

I visited Iran twice and love it there, really wanted to live there. Nobody looks at your hijab like you must be a crazy person, because everyone is wearing hijab. However, all my family members are here in the US, so I don't want to leave. 

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20 hours ago, Dubilex said:

Are shias in Lebanon at risk? Isn't Hezbollah completely dominating Lebanon? I thought shias enjoy benefits there

Salam Hezbollah has not completely dominanted Lebanon although it's very influential in Lebanon because  Lebanon is likewise a melting pot which every region of it is seperated by bold lines which some regions are only Christians or just Sunni which influence of Hizbollah is vary in any region anyway all Lebanese  people including Shias are benefitting from Hezbollah .

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On 6/29/2022 at 8:09 PM, Dubilex said:

Are shias in Lebanon at risk? Isn't Hezbollah completely dominating Lebanon? I thought shias enjoy benefits there

Well tbh I'm not exactly sure because it was my father and his family who were the refugees...I was born here in the west. 

But anyway, the political and economic state of Lebanon right now is a disaster. 

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On 6/30/2022 at 1:05 AM, Hameedeh said:

I visited Iran twice and love it there, really wanted to live there. Nobody looks at your hijab like you must be a crazy person, because everyone is wearing hijab. However, all my family members are here in the US, so I don't want to leave. 

That's interesting, because I do hear about some people (who are more motivated by religious reasons) who immigrate and live in Iran. Personally, I would jump at the chance to go there and see places like Isfahan and Mashhad and get a feel of the country myself. Though I don't think living there would be a realistic alternative, for many reasons .. not least of all the situation there.

 

On 6/29/2022 at 11:24 PM, Dubilex said:

Certainly, I prefer to live in the West. Although, with the way things are going, with LGBTQ indoctrination in schools and the increasing decadence in society, I'm not sure I'd wanna raise a kid here. If I marry and have kids, I would definitely see what options there are to give my children a muslim upbringing, protected from the current degeneracy plaguing the west. Which is a shame, I actually think the western civilization has a lot of good things and has contributed some really good things to the world.

Western civilisation was at its zenith when it the West was Western Christendom and not The Free Western world. This LGBTQ madness and moral descendance was inevitable the moment society norms and political ideology divorced religion .. you simply can't have a society that utterly shuns god and expect it to adhere to morals.
Fully agreed on the family part, I would never start a family there even if it were my only option 

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