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In the Name of God بسم الله

Collapse of Afghanistan

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Posted (edited)

 

According to this, Ghani has already resigned as President and has basically said Taliban are now the govt. They are saying 'talks' are now going on for a transitional govt. This is basically a ploy for Ghani and those close to him to make it out of Afghanistan alive and so they get to take some of their loot with them, probably to the Emirates. Taliban are now the govt of Afghanistan. 

Edited by Abu Hadi
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Posted (edited)

I’m sorry, the only thing I can do for our siblings in Afghanistan praying for them. May allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) protest us all. 

Edited by Diaz
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It seems that Ashraf Ghani has left Afghanistan, as told by Al Jazeera, which has been close to Taliban in the past weeks.

As for those who say Afghans didn't fight, the streets of Kandahar are full of dead unburied bodies of soldiers of the Afghan National Army (ANA), many of whom are young Shia brothers who became martyrs in that fight. And this is just one city. 

I want to see any country establishing diplomatic contact with Taliban, a terrorist group, which instead of taking part in elections chose to violently fight a democratically elected government.

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Posted (edited)

Even if the government has collapsed, there are currently some resistance cells against the Taliban. Please remember to pray for them that they win and beat the Taliban at least in those areas. I hope the Taliban can never reign over all of Afghanistan.

Edited by lover
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Anyone else see frontlines episode on the changes in Afghanistan?

https://youtu.be/CUvMvq0iPjw

I'm still working on finding a silver lining to all of this.

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5 hours ago, lover said:

Even if the government has collapsed, there are currently some resistance cells against the Taliban. Please remember to pray for them that they win and beat the Taliban at least in those areas. I hope the Taliban can never reign over all of Afghanistan.

Won't keep my hopes up. That entire country just became a failed state. Worst of all if other countries begin to acknowledge the Taliban as a legitimate government forefront which they will because of this peaceful transition of power, then nobody is going to do anything.

They'll probably just milk the situation as a way of further destabilizing the middle east. Because we know Sunni extremism doesn't stop at borders.

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I guess these anti taliban warlords have not been doing much against taliban for these last 20 years. They were in defensive mode protecting their territory. Ahmad shah massoud's son has warned taliban but I wonder what action he will take.

I really hope hazaras defend themselves.

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To my Pakistany brothers and sisters:

When i say alot of Taliban come from Pakistan, don't be offended, i don't mean to offend the people but the Gov or milita or groups in the country are somehow involved. Even Pakistany people suffer because of Taliban or other extremist groups, as the Christians and Shia suffer because of them. 

The reality is a lot of of them come from Pakistan (whether they're Pakistany or from Saudi/other countries is hard to tell - or perhaps Pakistan is being used as base to train terrorists).

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59 minutes ago, Abu Nur said:

What worries me is that Afghanistan will be a vessel for different terrorist groups to form and we could witness more groups like Isil. May God help the Afghanistan people for this nightmare.

I worry too, because they may create such groups and send them to Russia, China and Iran :(.

I hope I'm wrong.

God Help Us All

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I know there is at least one Iraqi here who is not too keen on Iranian 'meddling' in his country. But right now I think lots of Afghans must be praying hard for some Iranian 'meddling' and asking when it will happen.

Though there is the fear that if it does, the trap laid by the Americans will have been sprung.

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10 hours ago, Marbles said:

GHQ Rawalpindi wins the war after 20 years of perseverance.

US and India bite the dust.

Since the West and its allies like to blame Pakistan for the resurgence of Taliban, we might as well take the credit for once.

#copied

The U.S., as usual, likes to distance itself from its own strategy by voicing concern and blaming its own clients. Pakistan has merely been following the orders of its Western masters since the days of General Zia. The U.S. allowed—nay, ordered—Pakistan to protect bin Laden for a decade and resupply the Taliban and Company, courtesy of Saudi petrodollars. Bush and Cheney covertly intervened to prevent the Northern Alliance from apprehending a number of Pakistani operatives in northern Afghanistan during NATO’s invasion in October 2001.

Bush and Cheney allowed many ISI-linked Taliban and Qaida, bin Laden included, to escape via Pakistani military transport. They facilitated this because many of these Taliban and Qaida operatives were also linked to the CIA, MI6, and Mossad via Pakistan’s military-intelligence apparatus. The onetime head of the ISI himself, General Mahmud Ahmed, was involved in transferring cash to 9/11 accomplices prior to the attacks. His conduit, Ahmed Omar Said Sheik, had ties to the CIA and MI6 as an informant inside al-Qaida.

This is one reason why the U.S. could not afford to put bin Laden on trial, because doing so would expose the U.S. and Company’s role in 9/11, and also further illuminate the ties between U.S. energy interests in South-Central Asia and the Taliban up until 9/11. For instance, note how many of the alleged “hijackers” and “plotters” were also informants/double agents with ties to Western/Saudi/Pakistani/Israeli intelligence, including Special Forces, as well as to the West’s own proxy al-Qaida. See Atta, Jarrah, Ali Mohamed, Awlaki, et al.

8 hours ago, Jaabir said:

But hey! Don't forget the U.S's failure in the region!

The U.S. did not “fail” in Afghanistan. The past two decades of chaos were the intended results of occupation.

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Explaining his observations of some Pakistanis celebrating the Taliban's takeover, he said, "The hardline policy of theTaliban in Afghanistan will also impact Pakistan. The terrorist groups which operate against India like Lashkar-e-Taiba and Jaish-e-Mohammed will now have training camps and sanctuaries and havens in Afghanistan".

"Pakistan thinks that it has got an additional hand so that it can attack India and initiate its peace process in Jammu and Kashmir," he said.

"Pakistan has a very active role in helping the Taliban and I personally feel that it will provide safe havens to Al-Qaeda and other organizations like ISIS which are present in Afghanistan," he added.

He further informed that Pan Islamic terrorist organizations like ISIS and Al Qaeda will impact Europe and America as well. He said, "If these countries think they are safe, then I personally feel they are also living in a fool's paradise."

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But for China, a neighbor of Afghanistan with substantial investment in the region, the security challenges posed by the abrupt return of the Taliban are far more pressing than any strategic interests down the road. ...

China is particularly concerned that Afghanistan would become a base for terrorists and extremists fighting for the independence for the largely Muslim (Uighur – ed.) region of Xinjiang — a priority issue Wang raised with Taliban leaders during their meeting last month. ...

"Although Beijing is pragmatic about the power realities in Afghanistan, it has always been uncomfortable with the Taliban's ideological agenda," Small said. "The Chinese government fears the inspirational effect of their success in Afghanistan for militancy across the region, including the Pakistani Taliban."

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Quote

Even while moving physically towards Kabul with the Northern Alliance, their aim was to prevent them from taking over the government. It ostensibly went along with the British argument that a Pashtun leadership was needed for Kabul, given the overall ethnic composition of the country. It was also attempting to accommodate Pakistan’s demands, in return for receiving airspace access and later ground lines of communication for the movement of men and materials, that its security interests be protected by preventing a Northern Alliance takeover.

...the US has been constant in its efforts to weaken the erstwhile Northern Alliance structure and leadership. ...most were systematically removed from their positions of influence in government. Without first disarming the Taliban or their support structures fully in the South, disarmament was carried out in the North. The regional leadership was also systematically sought to be prevented from developing local political or other strengths.

...the US created a government structure and an army that has now been proven to need not just continued support, but also a continued US military presence. In this regard, the US did worse than the Soviet Union. The Mohammad Najibullah government lasted three years after military withdrawal of its patron, and eventually folded only when the Soviet Union dissolved in 1991 and the new Russia was not able to provide the requisite financial and other support.

In a 2014 comment, Pakistan’s former Inter-Services Intelligence Chief, Hamid Gul said that history would record that the ISI first defeated the Soviet Union in Afghanistan with the help of America, and then it “defeated” America there also with the help of America.

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25 minutes ago, Northwest said:

The U.S. did not “fail” in Afghanistan. The past two decades of chaos were the intended results of occupation.

US intended for things to be different but then came "Absolutely not" from Imran Khan

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56 minutes ago, Northwest said:

The U.S., as usual, likes to distance itself from its own strategy by voicing concern and blaming its own clients. Pakistan has merely been following the orders of its Western masters since the days of General Zia. The U.S. allowed—nay, ordered—Pakistan to protect bin Laden for a decade and resupply the Taliban and Company, courtesy of Saudi petrodollars. Bush and Cheney covertly intervened to prevent the Northern Alliance from apprehending a number of Pakistani operatives in northern Afghanistan during NATO’s invasion in October 2001.

Bush and Cheney allowed many ISI-linked Taliban and Qaida, bin Laden included, to escape via Pakistani military transport. They facilitated this because many of these Taliban and Qaida operatives were also linked to the CIA, MI6, and Mossad via Pakistan’s military-intelligence apparatus. The onetime head of the ISI himself, General Mahmud Ahmed, was involved in transferring cash to 9/11 accomplices prior to the attacks. His conduit, Ahmed Omar Said Sheik, had ties to the CIA and MI6 as an informant inside al-Qaida.

This is one reason why the U.S. could not afford to put bin Laden on trial, because doing so would expose the U.S. and Company’s role in 9/11, and also further illuminate the ties between U.S. energy interests in South-Central Asia and the Taliban up until 9/11. For instance, note how many of the alleged “hijackers” and “plotters” were also informants/double agents with ties to Western/Saudi/Pakistani/Israeli intelligence, including Special Forces, as well as to the West’s own proxy al-Qaida. See Atta, Jarrah, Ali Mohamed, Awlaki, et al.

The U.S. did not “fail” in Afghanistan. The past two decades of chaos were the intended results of occupation.

Since you seem to have insider knowledge of the deepest covert operations conducted by the US and its proxies across the region, anything anyone might say would sound redundant.

But I have only one observation to make. You seem to credit the US with so much power and reach to shape every bit of policy and its outcome, as if they or any of their proxies could never fail in their objectives. I am sure the Americans feel flattered. 

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Posted (edited)

The Taliban have started to force young unmarried girls above age of 12 years into marriage in Herat, which has a large Shia population. Marrying young educated girls with illiterate criminals (ex-cons) and terrorists. Exactly what I predicted in my second post in this thread.
This is another way how Shia genocide works, not just by killing them but by taking away Shia daughters and sons.

Edited by lover
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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, Jaabir said:

I truly wish misery on every Shi'a that has willingly turned a blind eye to the oppression their Afghan counterparts have been facing/will face now that the Taliban have taken over.

The irony that this is happening during Muharram with tears rolling down their cheeks and beating their chests for those who were oppressed, while at the same time not caring for the oppressed of today, exposes how ignorant they actually are about the lessons from the martyrdom of Hussain. Not only being uncaring, but having cups of chai on their borders with the present-day Yazid army.

We now see the vile intentions of Afghanistan's neighbours. Pakistan being the largest backer of the Taliban (no surprise here) while many ignorant ultra-nationalist Pakistani Shi'as will reject any sort of wrongdoing by their country's PM, army, or intelligence. Iranians and "al-Moqawama" taking the opportunity to cheer as the U.S departs and reminding you every 2 minutes how the U.S failed and will continue failing in the region. All of this at the expense of the Afghans who will now suffer. But hey! Don't forget the U.S's failure in the region! I guess al-Muqawima is only against those who we don't like, and we like the Taliban now!

I now realize how Iran's "help" for Iraq in 2014 was nothing but for their own interests. Iran can form militias out of thin air for Assad, fund and supply powerful missiles to heavily blockaded-Palestinians, "rush" for help when Iraq needs it, but can't lift a finger for Afghanistan? No, there is no conspiracy to "trick" Iran to intervene in Afghanistan so the West can attack Iran. Iran using the shrewd tactics they've used in other countries can easily end the Taliban's rule. If the actual armed forces of Iran intervened the Taliban would be finished in less than 24 hours. But no! Our help is only reserved for those we actually care about, and that doesn't include the Afghan Shi'as.

My heart truly breaks for all those Afghans who have been betrayed by their neighbours. One that clearly has been working against them for years, but also one that was supposed to be its well-wisher. Afghans have been recruited to fight in Iran's dirty war in Syria, dying in the thousands, but are abandoned when they need help in their home country. Pakistani Shi'a fighters are abandoned when they're arrested and vanished by ISI in Pakistan. May God's curses be upon those individual decision-makers responsible for the abandonment and betrayal of these oppressed people.

If you remember what happened in Iraq in 2014, it wasn't that long ago. At one point in 2014 up till early 2015, ISIS controlled more than 1/3 or Iraq and they were moving toward the Holy City of Najaf. They were even bragging about how they would destroy / burn down the cities of Najaf and Karbala and massacre the 'Rawafid'. They were also in control on a large portion of Syria. After that, the Fatwa of Sayyid Sistani took place, then Hajji Sha3bi was formed. It took more than a year before they were able to actually move against ISIS in Mosul. Resistance movements don't appear out of thin air. It takes time to form and train. 

It is absolutely false that this victory over ISIS was due to Iranian 'help'. The victory was because of the Iraqis themselves who put their lives on the line in order to defeat the terrorist gang. A simple proof of this is that all the videos I have seen of the liberation of Mosul showed the Resistance fighters (Hajji Sha3bi and other groups) talking to the people of Mosul in Arabic, in the Iraqi dialect of Arabic. As most of you know, Iranians don't speak Arabic, they speak Farsi, and even the ones who speak Arabic have a heavy accent. I live in a place where there are many Iraqis so I know what the Iraqi dialect sounds like. I never saw one video of any of the fighters speaking Farsi, or Arabic with an Iranian accent. So this is enough proof for me. 

I am not saying Iran didn't do anything. They did send certain help, but Iran is not a global power and does not have the resource to create victories like this. Iran cannot (for many reasons which should be obvious) send Iranian troops across the border into Afghanistan to fight the Taliban. As others have said, this would give the US / Israel / Zionists/ Wahabis a 'ready made' excuse to start a war with Iran, and may not even accomplish the goal of getting rid of the Taliban since many Afghans would see this as a 'foreign invasion force' just like how they see the US and saw the Russians in the past. Study history. No foreign army has ever succeeded in conquering Afghanistan and holding the country under their control. The US is just the latest in a long line or countries that tried and failed at this. 

The quick takeover by Taliban was due to the fact that the US was quite open about the fact that they were leaving, all the way back in April of this year, giving Taliban time to gather their forces, who were probably hiding in Pakistan, and move them across the border. Now that they have taken over, they have to hold the territory, which is much different than just taking territory. The brothers in Iraq were willing to fight them house by house and street by street for years until they gained victory. They started in Baghdad, where ISIS was the weakest and they had the most forces and moved North, inch by inch. It wasn't a quick or easy victory, but it happened with the help of Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى). 

If the Shia and the true Muslims in Afghanistan are willing to do this, they will get the same victory. 

Also, it is not true that the Shia around the world don't care about the brothers and sisters in Afghanistan. It is just that they don't see any practical way to help them. If you have a way, let us know about it. 

Edited by Abu Hadi
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5 minutes ago, realizm said:

:salam:

What info do we have about IS groups there ? Did they merge with Taliban? 

You mean isis?

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Posted (edited)
3 minutes ago, Diaz said:

You mean isis?

Yes IS ISIS ISIL whatever bogus state they claim to be. 

I am asking because while IS claimed many massacres recently, Taliban seemed to have a pragmatic approach to Shia, including raising Hazara leaders to high responsibility roles. 

Edited by realizm
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The situation is really depressing. I'm seeing videos in Reddit where people are literally clinging to a plane and later falling from it. Ya Allah :cry:.

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45 minutes ago, realizm said:

Yes IS ISIS ISIL whatever bogus state they claim to be. 

I am asking because while IS claimed many massacres recently, Taliban seemed to have a pragmatic approach to Shia, including raising Hazara leaders to high responsibility roles. 

No info about this. 

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While I did not agree with the Afghan invasion at the start, and felt we needed to pullout, this whole thing was a complete disaster and totally mismanaged.

US Secretary of State Anthony Blinken has been behind the scenes in all of this. An ardent Zionist and Israeli shill, he supported the 2003 invasion of Iraq, has consistently pushed for foolish foreign policy in the ME, and has no real understanding of the complexities in that region.

This is the guy who was arming Syrian "rebels" (aka ISIS) during the Obama administration

The fact that intelligence reported that the Taliban was 90 days from taking Kabul just a couple days ago, shows the failures here. That turned into a few days, and then became 12 hours. It is clear that the administration has no idea what it is doing at this point.

And now Iran and other countries in the region have to contend with a radical regime armed with US weapons on their borders --what is to stop the Taliban from launching attacks across the border, or starting proxy wars?

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Posted (edited)

@Silas

Iran was dealing with Taliban between 1996 and 2001, I do not think they will be a major threat to them honestly. 

Threat might be on Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and border countries which may become more and more permeable to armed groups and takfirism. 

Our brothers in Afghanistan, whether Shia or Sunnis, are the ones who might suffer the most. 

Edited by realizm
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