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In the Name of God بسم الله

Collapse of Afghanistan

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Meedy

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An article from yesterday on FT.

I have emboldened the most interesting parts. Please put an extra focus on the conclusion of this article to those interested in Afghanistan, as it is the most significant part.

 

Afghanistan’s looming famine: will the US help the Taliban?

Millions face starvation this winter after the withdrawal of foreign aid after the Islamist group took power

Benjamin Parkin and Fazelminallah Qazizai in Kabul

Like millions of Afghans, Sibghatullah Ahmadi was happy about the end of 20 years of war in his country. Fighting had devastated his village in Kapisa, a province near Kabul. But four months after the Taliban seized power and the US pulled out, he has little to cheer. Jobless and in debt, the 25-year-old now plans to leave his two-year-old child and pregnant wife to cross into Iran, where he will look for work on a construction site. Many like him opt to continue on a perilous overland journey to Europe. “I have to go,” he says, his surgical mask barely concealing the grimace. “It’s better than nothing. We have no money.” Since the Taliban took the capital Kabul in August — following a rapid military offensive — the foreign funding that made up nearly half of the country’s $20bn gross domestic product under former president Ashraf Ghani has stopped. Millions of Afghans who depended on the armed forces, bureaucracy or international organisations are now out of work or owed months of wages. Sanctions, and the freezing of more than $9bn in overseas central bank reserves by the US, have isolated the regime and further paralysed the economy. International groups and economists say Afghanistan’s swift unravelling is unprecedented. The IMF expects the economy to contract 30 per cent in a matter of months. Already the poorest country in Asia, according to the UN Development Programme, millions of Afghans are now unable to afford food. Unicef estimates that 1m children are at risk of dying from hunger as the freezing winter depletes food supplies and cuts off rural communities. The UN’s World Food Programme estimates that 98 per cent of Afghans do not have enough food, with at least a quarter of the 40m population approaching famine levels of food insecurity. “Every day we are witnessing the gradual collapse of one system. The banking system, the health system . . . education, water, sanitation — all of these systems are falling one after the other,” says Abdallah al-Dardari, the UNDP’s Afghanistan head.

“It can either implode with massive regional consequences, or something has to happen, but you cannot continue monitoring the collapse of each of these systems, with horrendous humanitarian consequences,” says al-Dardari. “People cannot just wait and see their children starving to death.” The Taliban, lacking the resources and expertise to stop the economic disaster, call the asset freezes evidence of the west’s callousness. “Just give us our own money,” says Shafi Azam, a director in the foreign ministry. “The international community is making ordinary Afghans hostages to avenge their own political failures.” The US and its allies defend the financial restrictions on Afghanistan as a response to the Taliban’s decision to conquer the country militarily — rather than reach a political settlement with the Ghani government — and its repressive practices towards women. But with Afghanistan on the brink of famine, there is growing popular and diplomatic pressure on the US, Europe and other countries to unfreeze the reserves and try and prevent what some fear will be a catastrophic humanitarian crisis.

Although some nations are providing limited food assistance and other aid through bodies like the UN, broader support to the Taliban-controlled country remains a political red line in the west. Yet critics warn that without more substantive measures, vital public health and education services will collapse. The US state department said on Monday that the US had provided $208m in humanitarian assistance to Afghanistan since August, more than any other country. “We all have a stake in an Afghanistan that is stable and secure,” it said, “but also a country where the humanitarian needs . . . of the Afghan people are being addressed.” Still, many Afghans direct their rage towards the US, Europe and their allies. Those individuals left behind in the chaotic evacuation feel betrayed, while analysts and foreign diplomats call the swift unravelling of the Afghan state an indictment of the deeply corrupt system the US and Nato spent 20 years fighting a brutal war to build. “The whole state was run on corruption,” says one western official. “That’s why it fell apart.”

‘Happier in war than victory’

After taking over Afghanistan, the Taliban promised they would bring order, end violence — both from the conflict and street crime — and crack down on corruption. Even many of their domestic critics concede some improvements on those counts, but whatever security now exists in Afghanistan is fragile and unevenly enjoyed. While the Taliban declared an “amnesty” for their former opponents, human rights groups have documented quiet campaigns of executions and “disappearances” of former police officers and others identified as rivals in provinces across the country.

The Taliban deny this, or attribute it to rogue fighters settling personal scores. But many Afghans are quietly terrified. “They don’t chase us during the day,” says one former US military interpreter who is trying to leave, but “at night they’re different”. The Taliban are also embroiled in its own counterinsurgency against the Islamic State Khorasan or Isis-K, an offshoot of the extremist group. The two sides have engaged in a vicious campaign of bomb attacks and executions that has killed hundreds of people since the summer. Terrorist attacks, often targeting mosques and areas associated with the country’s Hazaras, a Shia Muslim minority, continue with regularity including in Kabul. Hazaras, themselves long persecuted by the Taliban, are now dependent on the group for protection from Isis. “The Isis threat existed before. But with the coming of the Taliban, it is worse,” says Zaman, a 26-year-old Hazara student who is trying to leave Afghanistan. “We’re not hopeful for a better future.” Much about the Taliban’s new order remains unclear — and many Afghans who remember their brutal rule between 1996 and 2001 are sceptical about whether the group can change. Supreme leader Haibatullah Akhundzada remains so elusive that there are rumours he is dead, though these have been contradicted by recent reports of public appearances. Analysts and diplomats point to unresolved factionalism between the old guard of Kandahari leaders, such as deputy prime minister and Taliban co-founder Abdul Ghani Baradar, and the Haqqani group, whose power has surged since the takeover, represented by figures like interior minister Sirajuddin Haqqani. Taliban-run ministries have done little policymaking in the four months since taking power. Many of the fighters that make up their rank-and-file remain unpaid and are sometimes so poor they rely on non-Taliban assistance for food, housing and clothes.

One 27-year-old Taliban military officer, who arrived in Kabul over the summer after years of fierce fighting in Afghanistan’s provinces, admits to a degree of listlessness among himself and his men as they adjust from jihad to the daily reality of governing. Many, he says, “were happier in war than in victory. This was an ideological war and we were happy to be martyred.” “They were insurgents who would engage in hit and run tactics and then melt into the population,” says Asfandyar Mir, a senior expert at the United States Institute of Peace. “Now they have to man the police, the bureaucracy and do many mundane tasks.”

‘The shattering of dreams’

The Taliban’s repressive treatment of women is the biggest obstacle to its efforts to normalise relations with the world. When the group first ruled Afghanistan, women were not allowed to study or work, leave the house without a male guardian and were subject to sadistic punishment including stoning for rule-breaking. Nadia, aged 14, has not seen her best friends Zakira and Mariam since the Taliban arrived in Faizabad, a town in the foothills of northeastern Afghanistan’s Hindu Kush mountains, in early August. Like many teenage girls across the country, she has not been allowed to return to school and now spends her days helping her mother bake bread, wash dishes and sweep the mud-walled compound where she and her six siblings live. In Faizabad, as in much of Afghanistan, the Taliban have prevented girls above the age of 13 from studying. The group claims this is simply a temporary measure, but Nadia’s mother Mawia remembers when the Taliban were last in power, and does not believe such reassurances.  “Since they captured Faizabad, they’ve been saying that they’ll reopen schools. But my heart says that they’re lying,” she says. “We hope that Nadia studies and becomes something. I want her to become a professional, not like me.”

In some parts of the country at least, teenage girls are still allowed to study, women can continue working in certain jobs and they are not subject to blanket restrictions on their movement. The foreign ministry’s Azam says it’s only a matter of time before girls return to school nationally. He argues that the Taliban don’t want to push reform on deeply conservative rural communities, where girls were often not studying under the previous government either. The Taliban also claim to have softened other policies since they last ruled. Music and smoking — punishable before — are tolerated. At a recent wedding in Kandahar, even Taliban foot soldiers listened enthusiastically to live music and smoked shisha pipes. Yet foreign officials say the Taliban’s equivocation on girls’ education, despite intense international lobbying, points to the powerful resistance within the group. “They don’t want to look like they’re bargaining, especially on issues that are so integral to their identity,” one says. There are no females in high-ranking positions within the Taliban, and the group have cracked down on sporadic women-led protests triggered by its takeover of power. “Imagine the shattering of the dreams,” says Mary-Ellen McGroarty, Afghanistan director at the UN’s World Food Programme. “You had your hopes and dreams for your family, the next generation that was going to do better than you. And over the space of 24 hours that has all changed.” “The Taliban have never given a fair deal to the women of Afghanistan,” says one 25-year-old woman in Kabul, an active participant in a women’s rights group that has continued to protest. “They’re trying to force us to quit our jobs and stay at home.” The Taliban military officer dismisses the idea that women had a right to protest. “The only reason they protest is to leave [Afghanistan],” he says. “So why should we block the streets for the interests of a few women?” But the women’s rights activist, who until recently worked in a bank, is becoming disillusioned, concerned for her own safety and is now considering emigrating. “I was happy to remain in the country” after the Taliban took power, she says. However, “my fight was fruitless . . . so now I think it will be better to leave.”

The end game

Afghanistan’s economy surged after the US and its allies first ousted the Taliban regime in 2001, with gross domestic product rising from around $4bn in 2002 to $20bn last year. But many of those gains — not only in growth but health, education and opportunity — are swiftly being lost. Now, despite the limited humanitarian aid like food support, analysts say that more substantive funding is needed to protect the economy and public services from total collapse. The fate of billions of dollars worth of dams, mines and pipelines being built with western funds is also uncertain. Critics argue more support is necessary to prevent regional instability, fresh outbreaks of violence and a migrant crisis. Some countries, including the US, are talking to the Taliban through diplomatic channels in Qatar — which helped negotiate the peace deal between the two — while the EU and a handful of others plan to reopen missions in Kabul. Rival powers have sought to fill the void left by western countries. Russia, Turkey and Pakistan — whose longstanding covert support for the Taliban many blame for its victory — have all looked to deepen ties with Afghanistan since the Taliban took over. China has also expanded its presence, with business groups exploring the country’s vast reserves of minerals like lithium and striking deals to buy agricultural products. Khan Jan Alokzai, acting director of Afghanistan’s Chamber of Commerce, says that Chinese business activity in Kabul has swelled in recent months. “The US has paid in blood and treasure and the Chinese will get the fruit, get the harvest,” says one western official. Direct Chinese financial support to Afghanistan has been modest, providing around $30m in humanitarian aid in September. Azam says that the Taliban will not let Afghanistan become a vassal state to foreign powers, an implicit criticism of the previous administration.

“The relationship with the US, Pakistan, India, China, Russia — it will be based on our policies,” he says. “If the US or India wants a government to become a puppet, that will never happen.” Western officials question how long a Taliban government can last without foreign financial support, yet are slowly coalescing around an uncomfortable conclusion: its survival may be in their best interests. “The collapse of this regime would be catastrophic,” says one of them. “It would be worse for everyone.”

Some names have been anonymised to protect the identities of vulnerable sources

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1450 Afghan Children Evacuated by US Army without Parents

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It is said that many of these children may not be able to reunite with their families. This statistic, obtained in a recent CNN research from the Asylum Office, contains a destructive message about the evacuation process and its consequences.

“It is shocking that more than a thousand Afghan children are homeless in the US,” said Dr.Sabrina Parino, an Afghan-American pediatrician in .

These children are potentially feeling lonely and afraid and are waiting for foster parents, she added.

In the meantime, many child rights activists in the US say many children tried to flee Afghanistan with their families but were separated in the chaos, and others lost contact with their parents during the bombing.

According to US officials, a bunch of these children has been reunited with their families in a quick program by the Biden government.
 

 

According to US officials, a bunch of these children has been reunited with their families in a quick program by the Biden government.

About 250 of these children are still under government administration, some are in foster care, and most of these children have no family members to live with in the US, according to statistics provided by the Office.

Meanwhile, since the fall of the regime and the influx of people into Kabul airport, hundreds of orphans have been flown to the United States on military planes.

https://avapress.com/en/255495/1450-Afghan-Children-Evacuated-by-US-Army-without-Parents

OCCRP Lists Ghani Among 'Most Corrupt' People of 2021

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The Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project (OCCRP) has named former Afghan President Mohammad Ashraf Ghani as one of the most corrupt officials of the year.

Afghan Voice Agency (AVA)_Syrian President Bashar -Assad, Turkish President Recep Tayyip and Austrian Prime Minister Sebastian Kurz are also on the final list of the most corrupt people of the year. Belarusian President Aleksandr G. Lukashenko has been named 2021’s Person of the Year by the (OCCRP) in recognition of all he has done to advance organized criminal activity and corruption, OCCRP said.

Drew Sullivan, a co-founder of OCCRP who served as a judge on the panel, said that Ashraf deserves such an award due to his corruption and incompetence.

"Ghani certainly deserves an award, too. He was breathtaking in both his corruption and his gross incompetence. He deserted his people, leaving them to misery and death so he could live among the corrupt former state officials in the moral cesspool that is the ," said .

https://avapress.com/en/255510/OCCRP-Lists-Ghani-Among-Most-Corrupt-People-of-2021

 

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The Ambiguous Fate of Women in Afghanistan’s Armed Forces

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Farida, a former member of the Afghan Armed Forces, says she is ready to continue her work as a police officer.

Afghan Voice Agency (AVA)_Female soldiers in province say they have become destitute since the Taliban took control of Afghanistan, adding that they are in precarious security and economic situation. They say security threats on the one hand and poverty on the other have made life difficult for them. Meanwhile, the Taliban’s interior ministry says they are working on a method to clarify the fate of officers.

https://avapress.com/en/255488/The-Ambiguous-Fate-of-Women-in-Afghanistan-s-Armed-Forces

Women March in Kabul in Support of the Panjshir Protest

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Women in Kabul marched in support of the Panjshir protest on Tuesday (December 28th).

Afghan Voice Agency (AVA)_Following the protests over the killing of a young man in , women in in the streets in support of the protests under the slogan “Justice”

Women in Kabul marched in support of the Panjshir protest on Tuesday (December 28th), chanting “Bread, Work, Freedom, and .”

“Today, we have gathered here to speak out against the torture, oppression, and injustice that prevails in the country, although sometimes our voices are silenced,” said one protester. At today’s rally, women asked the Taliban to fulfill its amnesty commitments. “General amnesty is a lie,” they say.

https://avapress.com/en/255491/Women-March-in-Kabul-in-Support-of-the-Panjshir-Protest

 

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Video of Former Govt Officer’s Torture Sparks Reaction

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In the past few days, a video showing a military officer of the former government who was arrested being tortured by two men has sparked sharp reactions from social media users.

Afghan Voice Agency (AVA)_A large number of people on social media platforms have said such actions are clearly in contradiction to the general amnesty announced by the Islamic Emirate in the first days of its coming into power.

“They have announced a general amnesty and it is expected that they should uphold it because upholding promises will strengthen trust between the government and the people,” said Hekmatullah , a university lecturer.

https://avapress.com/en/255531/Video-of-Former-Govt-Officer-s-Torture-Sparks-Reaction

Dozens removed from security forces ranks in Badghis

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Local sources in western Badghis province say that 50 individuals have been removed from the ranks of security forces by the commission concerned.

Afghan Voice Agency (AVA)_Baz Mohammad , head of information and culture department in , told Pajhwok Afghan News that the commission had been able to identify 50 people as undesired since its inception.

According to him, the expelled people were from -e-Naw city and districts of the province. They were expelled from the forces of the Islamic Emirate of Afghanist

https://avapress.com/en/255516/Dozens-removed-from-security-forces-ranks-in-Badghis

 

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Armed Robbers Stole 450 Million Afghanis from the Taliban Forces

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The money was supposed to be transferred by the Taliban forces from Samangan to Mazar-e-Sharif by land.

Afghan Voice Agency (AVA)_Armed robbers have stolen 450 million afghanis of coal money of the -e-Suf in Samangan from Taliban forces on the -e-Sharif-Samangan highway, local sources say.

“The money was supposed to be transferred by the Taliban forces from Samangan to Mazar-e-Sharif by land,” said a source to Hasht-e Subh today Tuesday, December 28th.

https://avapress.com/en/255492/Armed-Robbers-Stole-450-Million-Afghanis-from-the-Taliban-Forces

Ministry of Finance says draft budget for next five years has been drawn up

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The Ministry of Finance (MoF) said the draft budget for the next five fiscal years has been prepared and will be submitted to the Council of Ministers for approval within the next week.

Afghan Voice Agency (AVA)_Ahmad Wali , a spokesman for the ministry, said the entire budget is dependent on domestic revenue income and not on foreign aid.

Haqmal said he expected the Council of Ministers to approve the draft budget by the end of the current month and submit it to the relevant agencies for implementation. Haqmal added: “The is ready in the ministry and its work is almost done.”

https://avapress.com/en/255511/Ministry-of-Finance-says-draft-budget-for-next-five-years-has-been-drawn-up

Taliban Appoints Mullah Baradar as Head of Natural Disaster Management

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Afghan Voice Agency (AVA)_The Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan’s cabinet meeting has appointed Akhund as head of the High Commission for Management.

The cabinet meeting of the (IEA) ordered the establishment of a High Commission for Natural Disasters, headed by Mullah Baradar, the Taliban’s first deputy prime minister on (Monday, December 27th).  

The High Commission for Disasters Management is supposed to take over the management of the natural crisis in the country.

https://avapress.com/en/255490/Taliban-Appoints-Mullah-Baradar-as-Head-of-Natural-Disaster-Management

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ACCI: Afghanistan export volume tops $1billion

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Afghanistan’s Chamber of Commerce and Industries (ACCI) said on Tuesday that domestic products worth more than $1billion have been exported in the current solar year.

Afghan Voice Agency (AVA)_ officials said exports include pine nuts, grapes, figs, carpets and medicinal plants.

According to them, most of the products and produce were exported to and India.

https://avapress.com/en/255534/ACCI-Afghanistan-export-volume-tops-1billion

No threat from Afghanistan’s borders to region: Taliban reacted to Putin’s concerns

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A spokesperson of the Taliban Inamullah Samangani reacted to the recent concerns of Russia’s President Vladimir Putin and added that there is no threat from Afghanistan’s borders to regional countries.

Afghan Voice Agency (AVA)_Inamullah in a voice clip on Monday, December 28 said that there is latterly neither potential nor a de facto threat from Afghanistan’s border to any other country.

During his meeting with Tajikistan’s President Emomali Rahman, Vladimir Putin said that the security situation on the         -Tajikistan border is concerning.

Putin mentioned his country’s military equipment given to Tajikistan’s military forces to get stronger and address potential threats from other countries.

“As we have assured security inside Afghanistan, the borders of Afghanistan are likewise well protected and are under surveillance. Rumors over Potential threats from our borders are baseless.” Said Samangani.

https://avapress.com/en/255532/No-threat-from-Afghanistan-s-borders-to-region-Taliban-reacted-to-Putin-s-concerns

Helmand: Residents of remote areas demand schools

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Residents of remote districts of southern Helmand province say a handful of schools in their areas lack buildings.

Afghan Voice Agency (AVA)_Sangin and Washer are among the districts that have a limited number of schools. Most of the schools there have no buildings and other facilities.

Residents of these districts say their children are studying in an unfavourable environment. They do not have the required facilities.

Abdul Qadir, a resident of Sangin district, said that the district had been deprived of development and basic services in the education sector.

He said there were only a handful of schools that did not have proper buildings. As a result, their children have to study under the open sky in this , causing them health issues.

https://avapress.com/en/255535/Helmand-Residents-of-remote-areas-demand-schools

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Supreme Court Employees Protest Over Unpaid Salaries

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Some employees of the Supreme Court on Monday held a demonstration in Kabul to protest their unpaid salaries. The protestors said that they haven’t received the salaries for the past four months.

Afghan Voice Agency (AVA)_“I have not received my salary for the past four months. It is winter and the weather is cold. All of the people are facing a lot of challenges,” said , an employee of the .  

“We have petitioned the Islamic Emirate since it came to power. They told us that we will not be dismissed and when we asked again, they told us to stay home for now,” said Mohammad Ilham, an employee.  

They said that around 900 employees have lost their jobs as some units of the Supreme Court were removed and that they are now facing an uncertain future. 

https://avapress.com/en/255477/Supreme-Court-Employees-Protest-Over-Unpaid-Salaries

Taliban asks national and international companies to sign with them security contracts

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National Public Protection Forces had replaced private national and companies and were providing security services to various national and international companies based on contracts. The Forces were inactive after the takeover.

Earlier, the UN announced that they have suggested over six million to the ministry of the interior ministry of the Taliban in return for protecting the staff and agencies of the in Afghanistan.

https://avapress.com/en/255469/Taliban-asks-national-and-international-companies-to-sign-with-them-security-contracts

 

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Buzkashi Competitions Start in Kunduz

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The match will be held for two days by the Buzkashi Federation and the Kunduz sports office with the financial support of a number of sports-loving businessmen.

Afghan Voice Agency (AVA)_ competitions between famous horse-mounted players at the level of Kunduz were held in the stadium of Sar-Dawra, Kunduz, the sports director of , Mohammad Qayyum Rahimi told Hasht-e Subh today (Monday, November 22).

https://avapress.com/en/253271/Buzkashi-Competitions-Start-in-Kunduz

Afghan blind runner won the London Half Marathon 2021

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A story of superhuman courage, willpower, and overcoming a life-changing injury.

Afghan Voice Agency (AVA)_Wali Mohammad Nouri, the country’s , won the half marathon in .

Nouri ran ten kilometers yesterday in the final round of the half marathon race and won first place among 500 runners.

https://avapress.com/en/253242/Afghan-blind-runner-won-the-London-Half-Marathon-2021

Taliban reopens National Museum in Kabul

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Officials of the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan said that the countries national museum based in Kabul has been reopened to visitors and people can visit the museum on daily basis.

Afghan Voice Agency (AVA)_The museum opens nearly four months after it was closed by the and its authorities after the group took over on August 15.

In the meantime, the head of Afghanistan’s national museum Fahim Rahimi said that some antiquities of the museum have been looted and were seen abroad.

Fahim Rahimi added that the antiquities were not stolen during the Taliban rule and added that they are in contact with Afghan embassies to return the to Afghanistan.

https://avapress.com/en/254254/Taliban-reopens-National-Museum-in-Kabul

Herat old city not registered with UNESCO due to corruption

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findings show 30 percent houses in the old city of western Herat province have been destroyed to build high-rise buildings during the former government — a reason the city could not be registered with UNESCO.

Afghan Voice Agency (AVA)_ is one of ancient cities in western Afghanistan. The city has more than 700 ancient buildings, including the old city of the province.

Darb area to Darb Malek areas and Mujtame Musla (prayer ground) are among old sites of the province. Other ancient sites of the city include Herat Grand Mosque, Chahar Sawq Pool, Qala-i-Ikhtiaruddin and Jewish synagogues.

https://avapress.com/en/253784/Herat-old-city-not-registered-with-UNESCO-due-to-corruption

Afghans urge IEA to preserve historical sites

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Afghans have called on the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan (IEA) to help preserve the country’s rich heritage of historical sites which they say could attract thousands of foreign tourists a year.

Afghan Voice Agency (AVA)_Dozens of historical sites are dotted around the country, including the famous Bamiyan Buddha niches. However, many of these have fallen into disrepair after years of conflict.

One local tourist, who was visiting , said he decided to visit the province following the take over of the IEA and the improved security situation.

https://avapress.com/en/254142/Afghans-urge-IEA-to-preserve-historical-sites

Ghor's Ancient Minaret of Jam in Danger of Collapsing: Officials

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The Minaret of Jam, a historic structure located in the western province of Ghor, is on the brink of collapse, provincial officials said on Friday.

Afghan Voice Agency (AVA)_the Minaret of Jam was registered with the world heritage site in 2002. It stands between the Harirood river and the outskirts of Sarba Falak.   

“If attention is not paid to the condition of the minaret, we will soon see the collapse of the minaret and it is a big shame. The officials at UNESCO should pay attention to this issue,” said Abdul Hai, head of Ghor's information and culture department. 

https://avapress.com/en/253075/Ghor-s-Ancient-Minaret-of-Jam-in-Danger-of-Collapsing-Officials

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ACB announces Afghan women’s cricket will remain intact

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Mirwais Ashraf, the newly appointed Afghanistan Cricket Board (ACB) acting Chairman, said at a meeting with departmental managers that women will continue to play cricket as normal, the ACB said in a statement.

Afghan Voice Agency (AVA)_ Ashraf said that ’s_cricket is one of the major requirements of the ICC and they are committed to meeting their obligations.

https://avapress.com/en/253375/ACB-announces-Afghan-women-s-cricket-will-remain-intact

A Famous Afghan Poet, died at 90 in Fayz Abad

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Sayyad Badakhshi has left three books of poetry, his book "The Song of the Poor" has been published and his other two books are still in pen form.

Afghan Voice Agency (AVA)_Abdul Malik Sayyad, known as “Sayyad Badakhshi”, one of the famous poets and writers of Badakhshan, died last night in , the capital of the province.

Mohammad Asif Bedar, one of the members of Sayyad’s family confirmed his death in an interview with Hasht-e Subh.

https://avapress.com/en/253533/A-Famous-Afghan-Poet-died-at-90-in-Fayz-Abad

With Schools Closed, Kandahar Girls do Art at Home

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Two Kandahari girls turned their home into a painting and drawing center following the closure of the girls’ educational centers in Kandahar city.

Afghan Voice Agency (AVA)_The girls, who are sisters, turned one of the rooms in their house into a painting and drawing center, and from this room they are promoting the art of painting and drawing.
They said they don’t want their last few years' struggles to be forgotten.
The girls urged the Islamic Emirate to reopen for girls.
“I ask the Islamic Emirate to reopen all the educational institutions so that all girls can go and learn their lessons,” said Shugofa Amiri, a painter.
“They have given us 10 to 12 rules which are very strict. They told us that you should not come without Mahram,” said Masoma Amiri, a painter.

https://avapress.com/en/252651/With-Schools-Closed-Kandahar-Girls-do-Art-at-Home

 

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https://af.shafaqna.com/FA/494766

Afghan social affairs expert: Brain drain is slowing down development of Afghanistan

Dr. Amanullah Fassihi, a Sociologist and Professor at the Afghan University, in an interview with Shafaqna said:

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He added: “I am aware that a large number of private universities are currently without professors, because the elites and educated people who taught in these centers have left the country. Top executives and businessmen, whoever had a way to go, left. I heard that a number of our national businessmen also withdrew their investments and left or are leaving. So in the short term we are practically involved in this crisis.” Fassihi said: “It is also natural that this huge number of elites will not return. The situation will not return to normal, and in this situation, we have lost great human. It takes a long time for other human resources to replace them and adapt to new conditions.”

 

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When a country’s Human Resources leaves, we can no longer replace it. Every person who comes later has his place, but he can never replace the previous one. So we are certainly facing a slowdown in development. This is definitely a blow to our social body.”

https://en.shafaqna.com/241929/afghan-social-affairs-expert-brain-drain-is-slowing-down-afghan-society-in-development-recent-crisis-in-afghanistan-is-deep/

Afghanistan: Women activists protest Taliban’s new restrictions [photos]

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Women have said that despite international pressure, girls’ schools are still closed and more restrictions are being imposed on women every day, to the extent that they have even banned women from riding in public transport. They added that the international community, the United Nations and all international institutions have remained silent in the face of the Taliban.

7F7012D3-7C15-46CA-8A77-9C11860CB3DA.jpeg

https://en.shafaqna.com/242242/afghan-women-activists-protest-new-taliban-restrictions-photos/

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I have posted about the forced displacement of thousands of Hazara of Daikundi by the Taliban in this post:

https://www.shiachat.com/forum/topic/235071515-collapse-of-afghanistan/?do=findComment&comment=3361932

And I shared some background information by German magazine Der Spiegel in this post:

https://www.shiachat.com/forum/topic/235072361-taliban-massacre-hazaras/?do=findComment&comment=3362925

Now the same magazine has published an article on how the news about the expelling of Hazara from Daikundi became public, despite the Taliban trying to prevent the news to be spread.

The translated article:

This story is about how the Taliban, in one of the most remote corners of Afghanistan, wanted to snatch land together with a brutal landowner - and what it was like to cover it as a reporter.

The Taliban did not expect that a few thousand people in the inaccessible valleys would vocally defend themselves. On Facebook. This is when an ex-village school director comes into play: Ghulam Hazrat Mohammadi. He gathered people for a protest video, made his way to Kabul via secret routes and started a social media campaign. We reporters found Mohammadi, spoke to other refugees, and set off for Daikundi.

Ghulam Hazrat Mohammadi gathers the villagers for a protest video, sneaks past the Taliban posts to Kabul and starts a social media campaign. We find Mohammadi through local contacts, talk to other refugees, see copies of their land ownership documents, and set off for Daikundi.

Google Maps shows a 7 hours and 47 minutes drive from Kabul to the provincial capital. That sounds unproblematic. But nobody has informed Google that large parts of the road were partly torn away and partly buried by landslides years ago. Also on the bypass route the car collapses after an hour and a half, unfortunately on the roundabout of the Taliban stronghold Maidan Shah, unfortunately for two hours, while strange smiling men assure us that it is a good idea to fight all infidels.

First the fuel line failed, then the fuel pump. Hours later, after countless crashing encounters with the bedrock, the exhaust falls off. We land in a dump with a clatter and at walking pace, feel sorry for even the Taliban at the post, who apologize for the dust and the streets, and leave the indestructible Toyota Corolla to a local welder.

In the »Flying Coach«, a raised minibus with what feels like the engine power of an armored personnel carrier, we continue, on the evening of the second day we reach the provincial capital Slopes to get to the villages. At sunrise in front of a spectacular mountain backdrop, the axle suspension breaks. One of the men runs up a hilltop, manages to make a phone call, hours later a motorcyclist arrives, balancing a complete leaf spring on the luggage rack.

The subsequent story of the arbitrariness and expulsion of the peasants hits a sore point with the Taliban leadership in Kabul: their efforts to present themselves to the West as purified rulers. Contrary to expectations, weeks later one of the top Taliban judges issued a decree that the expropriations would have to be reversed until the judicial process had gone through all instances.

But then the new disorder in Afghanistan becomes apparent: the local leadership accepts the dictum and allows the refugees to return, but only to drive them out again. The landowner appealed. Mohammadi has since fled to Iran, other farmers continue to protest. The landowner calls SPIEGEL: We should stop interfering. He would drive every farmer out of his house, "and if he and his children freeze to death on the street, they deserve it!"

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An article on the Japanese news magazine The Diplomat about the National Resistance Front (NRF) of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan and on what aspects their success or failure depend. I post the full article, although in my opinion Michael Kugelman's analysis at the end, which I have highlighted, is the most significant part of the following article.

 

Below the full text of the article:

What Does the National Resistance Front of Afghanistan Have to Offer? 

The NRF says it is pushing for a new trajectory in Afghanistan.

By Nilly Kohzad

December 15, 2021

Since the Taliban seized power in Afghanistan in August, one group has remained strident in its resistance, with plans of expanding on both a national and global level. 

The National Resistance Front of Afghanistan (NRF), a grassroots resistance movement that emerged from the rugged terrain of the Panjshir Valley, has vowed to keep its momentum strong against Taliban aggression, despite the group’s rise to power with its taking of Kabul four months ago.

Historically, the Panjshir Valley served as a pocket of resistance in the past against the Soviet invasion and subsequently the Taliban’s rise in the 1990s. A little north of Kabul, its mountainous landscape provides a defensive advantage that has played a strong role in making it the epicenter of guerrilla warfare, withstanding all types of foreign interlopers that have knocked on its doors.

Today, the NRF finds itself trapped in a deja-vu moment as it grapples with the challenges of ridding Afghanistan of the Taliban once again, and this time alone.

Who Are the NRF?

The NRF is led by Ahmad Massoud, son of Ahmad Shah Massoud or the “Lion of Panjshir,” a key figure who led multiple offensives against the Taliban in the 1990s.

Ahmad Shah Massoud played a critical role in forming an anti-Taliban resistance after the group’s first rise to power in 1996. The powerful commander was known for his larger-than-life personality and keen leadership. He was assassinated by al-Qaida just two days before the 9/11 attacks.

For his now 32-year-old son, Massoud junior, the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree. Ahmad Massoud is closely following in his late father’s footsteps through the formation of his own resistance movement.

“Ahmad Massoud is young, clean, and educated, he is not associated with the corruption of the past 20 years,” says NRF foreign relations head Ali Nazary. 

“We resist for freedom, justice, independence and for the welfare of every single citizen inside the country. The NRF was formed by people, not political parties and its platform is not for a specific region or a specific ethnic group. We are fighting for everyone in the country. The only resistance group that has a legitimate presence inside Afghanistan at the moment is the NRF,” says Nazary. 

For many people joining the resistance movement, the NRF is more than just an idea. 

Dadgar, a commander with the uprising who goes by his last name, says he joined the resistance because of his shared values with the movement. “We have respect for the law, human rights, women’s rights, children’s rights and freedom. Those who control Afghanistan today do not value these things and they challenge anyone who is against them. This situation inspired me to join the resistance and stand up against the Taliban. We are not in favor of war or the continuation of war. Our resistance is not for war but for peace. We want a government that respects and values these basic rights.”  

The demographics of those involved in the resistance vary, and these days and weeks, recruiting for the NRF has become simpler due to Taliban aggression.

“In Panjshir we have around 17 bases and it’s well protected with ground and aerial forces. Same with Parwan, Kapisa, Badakhshan, Balkh and Takhar. People are also reaching out to us from the east and the south but it’s going to take time for them to announce their forces, it’s because you have the Taliban oppressing many Pashtuns, the Achakzai tribe is a good example,” says Nazary.

He also mentions that the Taliban’s ethnocentric policies throughout the country, especially in the north, have convinced people that they should join the resistance, making it easier for the NRF. 

“We haven’t been making much of an effort. The people themselves willingly come and reach our bases. We have been getting many youth [to] join our ranks, middle-aged men, remnants of ANDSF and former professionals; it’s been a drastic increase compared to September and our pockets of resistance are in many provinces not just Panjshir or Andarab.”

The Taliban contests the NRF’s claims, with spokesman Muhammad Suhail Shaheen recently telling Russian media that the Taliban is not militarily engaged with the group. According to TASS, Shaheen said, “What they call National Resistance exists only on paper, there’s no place you can see them on the ground. They don’t really care about the people of Afghanistan, they care about some former rulers, they have no grassroot support. They depend on social media and spread fake news; this is it.”

Michael Kugelman, deputy director of the Asia Program and senior associate for South Asia at the Wilson Center, weighs in on the NRF’s ground potential by stating that they are a modest movement with limited military capacity but still a very determined group of fighters, nonetheless. He believes that the resistance is finding it difficult to operate inside the country as the Taliban control the majority of Afghan territory, but this notion could change depending on how the coming months unfold.

“If the Taliban are unable to consolidate power and gain legitimacy domestically then that could allow the resistance to strengthen and that could benefit the current resistance. But right now, we are looking at an anti-Taliban force that is quite modest and doesn’t really have the military capacity to do much at this point,” says Kugelman. 

Kugelman argues that the satisfaction or dissatisfaction of the Afghan people will be largely dependent on how the Taliban deal with their handicaps such as their internal divisions or whether they can address incredibly challenging policy conundrums such as the unfolding catastrophic humanitarian crisis. This will either push Afghans toward or away from the resistance; only time will tell. 

Out With the Old, In With the New  

Moving forward, the NRF believes in revamping Afghanistan’s outdated social and political systems in order to bring forth something that will serve the people first. From the movement’s perspective, Afghanistan has experienced a vicious cycle of conflict and to end this perpetual conflict, they have proposed certain systematic and political changes that can undo the divisions of the past few decades thus creating a new social contract. 

“The only way of ending this conflict which has always been over power is to distribute power from Kabul to elsewhere, so everyone sees themselves being part of the power structure, which has never happened in this country. We believe the best political system is a decentralized system which can devolve power from the center to the peripheries,” says Nazary.  

For a multiethnic and multicultural country like Afghanistan where no particular group enjoys dominance, a political system that embraces diversity and could guarantee political and social pluralism is what the NRF find most fitting. 

“We believe, to have social justice, freedom, for everyone to enjoy their rights and be equal under the law — you need a new political system, a new Afghanistan. And the best political system in our view is a federal system, which many multinational/multicultural states have embraced and have been successful in bringing stability and lasting peace in their country,” says Nazary.

Leaders of the NRF have noted the importance of learning from other countries’ experiences and adapting them to fit Afghanistan’s unique mold. 

“This is why we have been emphasizing a new formula that is compatible with our traditions, and our realities, and could be acceptable to every citizen in the country. Unfortunately, the models of governance that have been used in the past few decades and generally in the past few centuries have never been based on these realities,” says Nazary. 

However, experts like Kugelman view a completely new form of governance as unrealistic and untimely. “I think it’s much too ambitious of a goal to impose a new form of governance at this time. That would require another war, which I don’t think there is much stomach for.”

“Mobilize, Organize, and Influence”

In the four months since the Taliban takeover, the NRF has experienced heavy clashes, late night ambushes, and skirmishes with the Taliban. Fighting continues despite the coming cold months ahead. 

Commander Dadgar says, “The weather has gotten cold, but we are continuing our efforts, we are constantly changing our locations for our safety, and we are in touch with all resistance members in every active province, there is no stopping.”

In terms of formal plans, Nazary says, “We have both political efforts and military efforts. We are preparing ourselves militarily and we have a military strategy that we are pursuing.”

Politically, the NRF are lobbying against the possible international recognition of the Taliban’s government as the legitimate government of Afghanistan.

“We believe we need representations throughout the world. Our first representation is here in the United States, we have the rights to operate and be able to lobby and advocate here. We are working on opening more offices to bring such awareness throughout the world,” says Nazary.

In late October, the NRF registered under the Foreign Agents Registration Act in the United States in order to engage in political lobbying. Registration is not tied to any sort of political recognition on the part of the U.S. government.

With these activities, the NRF positions itself as very different from the Taliban and hopes to take advantage of those differences. 

“We are different from the Taliban, they are a sanctioned group, considered a terrorist group, with limited movement. However, we can travel and have any type of activity based on the laws of the countries we are operating from. We have the support of the diaspora communities which could make a big difference. We are also present on social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Clubhouse, Twitter Spaces etc. We are using every possible approach and means there is to organize, mobilize, spread awareness, and influence opinion. This is our greatest strength,” Nazary says.

Kugelman sees the NRF’s efforts to spread awareness as justifiable, but argues that the group must jump through many hoops in order to make any noticeable change.

“The NRF have to get the word out, they are trying to emphasize the urgency of their fight, which is the right thing to do, but it’s tough in a context where so many key players and key countries want to move on and unfortunately forget about the war. The U.S., for example, has no compelling motivation to get involved with internal players of the resistance. If anything we have heard the Biden administration saying that they perceive bigger priorities elsewhere.”

In terms of the use of social media as a tool, Kugelman mentions the heavy risks it has posed ever since the Taliban takeover. 

“There has been so much misinformation about Afghanistan that has flooded social media, both relating to the Taliban and to the NRF. In that sense it’s important for the NRF to correct their record. More and more analysts like me have become increasingly mistrustful of content that’s posted on social media, especially [from accounts] that are not verified.”

A Message to the World  

With Afghanistan’s rapidly worsening humanitarian and economic crisis, the NRF predicts that there are only two paths for the future. Either Afghanistan is saved, and democracy is reestablished, or the current situation continues, and international terrorism increases its presence and threatens Afghanistan’s existence.

Afghanistan is at a very critical juncture in its history, much worse than anything the people have experienced before. Despite this, Nazary believes the international community can reverse many of these changes. 

“There is still time to make a new trajectory that could bring lasting peace and freedom, but without a proactive policy or role from the international community, it is very difficult for only the NRF to save the whole nation. We are going to do our best and continue our struggle until we free every single inch of Afghanistan but to be successful in this endeavor, we will need the support of the international community and ignoring this problem will not help anyone.”

AUTHORS

GUEST AUTHOR

Nilly Kohzad

Nilly Kohzad is an Afghan American economist and journalist. Follow her on Twitter @NillyKohzad

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Posted (edited)

It is becoming increasingly clear that the fall of Kabul to the Taliban was not an accident, but a carefully planned operation by NATO and Co. Under President Trump subordinate officials such as Secretary of Defence Pompeo, in collusion with the Pentagon and CIA, worked hard to ensure that the Taliban would not be forced to comply with the terms of the deal between the U.S. and the Taliban in Qatar. This unstated policy continued under “President” Biden, and the result, including the “loss” (or rather handover) of heavy military equipment to the Taliban, was spun by the MSM as a result of “incompetence” or “faulty intelligence.” Ghani, himself highly compromised to begin with, was merely the scapegoat for a larger group of higher-level conspirators who had been arming and financing the Taliban since their formal “overthrow” in 2001.

The decades-long link between Pakistani military-intelligence networks and the Taliban vis-à-vis Western/Zionist sponsorship has never been fully broken. Since NATO’s invasion of Afghanistan Saudi and Qatari funding via Pakistan has been more than sufficient to keep the Taliban “in the field.” None of this financing would have been possible without Western/Zionist sanction. Now Turkey is actively working with its Qatari patrons and Pakistani partners to recognise the Taliban. Much to China‘s dismay, the Taliban have not broken their links to al-Qaida and Daesh, both of which are heavily staffed by Uighur Wahhabi–Salafi Islamists from Xinjiang, many of whom have fought in Syria and elsewhere. Now the U.S. is openly mulling direct investment in the Taliban’s infrastructure, indicating increased audacity on the part of the Anglo-American and Zionist bloc.

All this is well timed to coincide with the difficult domestic situation in Iran. A revival of the BCCI and Iran-Contra’s old mujahideen network in Afghanistan allows NATO to foster the resurgence of Wahhabi–Salafi Islamism in South-Central Asia. Currently the U.S. is putting immense pressure on Pakistan to reduce its financial dependence on China’s CPEC (BRI) in favour of a return to its old reliance on the GCC. This comes as India under Modi is fully aligned with the West’s anti-China agenda, acting as an auxiliary of the Five Eyes’ AUKUS (Australia–U.K.–U.S.). By linking anti-Chinese forces in the region to the military-financial potential of a “Sunni”/Zionist NATO (Turkey + Pakistan + Saudi Arabia/Qatar, in conjunction with a “neutralised” India), the Zionist West can challenge not just China, but also Russia and Iran, while also uniting elements of the Muslim Brotherhood and the Taliban to al-Qaida and Daesh.

As has been mentioned elsewhere, India under Modi has largely abandoned its former Afghan, Iranian, and Chinese partners in favour of a closer link with the Anglo-Saxons, Israelis, and Saudis. NATO and Co., in turn, are using their new Indian satraps to pressure both Iran and Pakistan. As a result, Pakistan is starting to drift back into the Western orbit and returning to its old status as a Western military outpost for mujahideen operations against Russia and Iran, while also acquiescing to anti-Chinese activities in neighbouring Afghanistan. While continuing to rely on existing Chinese investments within its confines, Pakistan is no longer seeking to oppose anti-Chinese activities on its borders. In exchange for a reduction in anti-Chinese terrorism inside Pakistan, Pakistan, in deference to India and its Western masters, is going to passively facilitate anti-Chinese terrorism elsewhere. A big bloc will coalesce on a shared anti-Russian, anti-Chinese, and anti-Iranian basis.

By turning India against China, NATO and Co. have successfully begun to recover their influence over Pakistan. Neither Pakistan nor India will do anything to stop anti-Chinese agendas in South-Central Asia. By linking Pakistan with Turkey and Qatar as well as the KSA, NATO and Co. will also have the means to project power vs. Russia and Iran via Turkey’s influence in the MENA and in Turkic Eurasia, especially the latter’s ties to al-Qaida and Daesh via the Uighur militants. With India “neutralised” under Western tutelage, and Turkey seeking to mend relations (that is, unify) with the KSA, Russia, China, and Iran are now much more exposed than previously. Like Turkey, Qatar will also begin to act more uniformly in line with the KSA, as part of the aforementioned “Sunni”/Zionist NATO vs. Russia, China, and Iran. Afghanistan under the Taliban will once again be a major springboard for this agenda.

Do not think for a second that the current situation in Afghanistan was not part of the PTB’s “plans” all along.

Edited by Northwest
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7 hours ago, Northwest said:

Do not think for a second that the current situation in Afghanistan was not part of the PTB’s “plans” all along.

I agree. As I said before, this was a set up and sophisticated plans towards causing chaos/problems for Russia, China and Iran :(

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The recent “colour-revolution” attempt in Kazakhstan is almost certainly related to Turkey’s support for al-Qaida and Daesh via Azerbaijan and Afghanistan. Reportedly Wahhabi–Salafi militants were involved in recent violence vs. Kazakh authorities, in an effort to undermine Kazakhstan’s relations with Russia and China. NATO’s covert support for the Taliban in Afghanistan has facilitated the emergence of Daesh as a factor vs. Russia and China as well as Iran in South-Central Asia. Now that Turkey was able to win vs. Armenia in the Caucasus, the destabilisation of Iran’s neighbours is accelerating on multiple fronts, Azerbaijan and Afghanistan being utilised as transits and bases for Wahhabi–Salafi militants, thereby aiding NATO, Israel, and the GCC. So Iran was clearly wrong to support Turkey vs. Armenia in the recent Nagorno–Karabakh conflict.

Turkey’s danger to Iran and its “friends” has rapidly eclipsed that posed by Saudi Arabia. Turkey supports Pashtun, Chechen, Albanian, Uighur, Uzbek, Kyrgyz, and Kazakh militants vs. Russia, China, and Iran. Under Erdoğan Wahhabi–Salafi ideology now controls the Turkish military-intelligence establishment, secularist and traditionalist Muslim elements having been purged. Now Turkey and its financial patron Qatar, as mentioned, are engaging in wide-ranging rapprochement with the Saudis and their Egyptian clients, thus accounting for Turkey’s willingness to serve as a military and diplomatic proxy for the GCC vs. Iran, Hezbollah, Ansar Allah, the PMUs, the Northern Alliance, and so on. Expect Hamas to either fracture or capitulate to Turkey’s pro-Israeli and pro-Saudi tendencies.

“Sunni”/Zionist NATO, having failed in its objectives to date, is, under pressure, steadily consolidating into a formidable bloc, realising that it needs to coordinate its activities in order to meet Western objectives. As mentioned previously, Turkey is a much more powerful regional entity than any other in the MENA except Israel and Iran, followed by Egypt. Turkey, like Qatar, is now solidly falling in line with the Saudi–Bahraini–Egyptian axis. Egypt lacks the economic and military power to contain Turkey, and the Saudis, like their Bahraini clients, are subject to Western/Zionist hegemony, so Egypt has followed the Saudi line in seeking better financial and possibly military ties with Turkey, if not Qatar. The West wants Saudi Arabia to join Qatar in continuing to increase its financial support for Erdoğan’s AKP–MHP Wahhabi–Salafi–pan-Turkic regime.

Unlike the GCC, Turkey maintains a sophisticated, professional, and diversified military apparatus as well as defence industry. Turkish drones have performed quite successfully in Libya, Ukraine, the Caucasus, and Syria. Turkish “soft power” extends to its ethnic, linguistic, and religious sway over a wide swath of Turkic peoples from the Balkans to Xinjiang, enhanced by Turkey’s support for the Muslim Brotherhood as a “goop cop“ vs. the statist GCC’s “bad cop.” Turkey has a well-established PR regimen that can effectively whitewash Erdoğan’s Islamist-fascist regime as “democratic” and “elected” vs. that of, say, MbS, MbZ, Sisi, Haftar, and other pro-GCC leaders. Turkey can therefore integrate the Saudis’ Wahhabi–Salafi proxies into its own military-intelligence apparatus and deploy them in much of Eurasia.

Expect Turkey to become the leader of NATO’s “wartime coalition” vs. Russia, China, and Iran, as all other options have failed.

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At a time when Ukraine was seen as being under threat, it is fortuitous that Kazakhstan will now preoccupy Russian minds. When I was there in the late 90s Kazakh/Russian ethnic tensions were an issue, I wonder if they still are.

An ethnic Kazakh dimension to this could also trouble China.

So a flare up in Kaz gets the west to poke two adversaries at little/no cost.

 

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Its Terrifying and horrifying how much oppression and genocide the Some of West and Some of the arab countries are willing to support in order to achieve their objectives, they're willing to have or kill millions and millions of people just for what ??? They're willing to destroy the earth to achieve their goals.

May God Hasten the appearance of Imam Mehdi (AJTF)

 

 

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On 1/7/2022 at 11:32 AM, Northwest said:

The recent “colour-revolution” attempt in Kazakhstan is almost certainly related to Turkey’s support for al-Qaida and Daesh via Azerbaijan and Afghanistan.

Worth bearing in mind that sometimes these revolutions kick of suddenly for a reason - i.e. there is no decades long propaganda against the country in question. 

The example of Kazakhstan provides a possible reason why:

Quote

Turmoil in Kazakhstan shows why its elite favours London as a location for assets, business dealings and second homes. The UK offers hard currency, offshore banking and the rule of law with few questions asked. ...

Kazakhstan’s highest-profile paid UK adviser was Tony Blair Associates, a consultancy set up by the former prime minister that is no longer in operation. 

https://www.ft.com/content/3b641286-fc89-4e80-a54e-76553ffd6c6d

The Kazakh leadership had obviously paid 'protection money', but clearly there comes a point when other geo-political concerns take priority.

 

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Afghanistan on the brink of civil war, after Uzbek have attacked Pashtuns in Faryab province, after the arrest of an Uzbek Talib by Pashtun Talibs.

The Hazara have also attacked the Taliban in north Afghanistan: 

 

Edited by lover
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5 hours ago, Meedy said:

@lover It's good to see afghan fighting back.

Unfortunately the Pashtuns are brainwashed and continuing to try to eradicate others.

@Meedy

The Pashtun Wahhabi–Salafi terrorists are only “brainwashed” because they are willing to be brainwashed and used as foreigners’ puppets. It is all too easy to excuse subhumans such as terrorists by claiming “misguidance” and “brainwashing,” when in fact the terrorists willingly choose to stop thinking rationally and blindly follow religiously bigoted “leaders.” They are ultimately to blame for their predicament and that of Afghanistan. If not for their willingness to stop using their God-given intellect and serve foreigners’ interests (by killing rival Muslims and non-Muslims alike), NATO and Co.’s activities could not continue for another day.

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A congregation of Uzbek leaders about the current events in Faryab and the arrest of Makhtoom 'Alem Rabbani, an Uzbek Taliban high ranking member, has condemned the foreign forces (Pashtun Taliban). The speaker mentions that "you were thirsty for our blood and we were thirsty for your blood, but we made peace with you because our elders have told us so". He calls the "foreign forces" as jackals:

 

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Just a few hours ago the Taliban have stormed a mosque in Takhar: https://youtu.be/gavH0IcxzG0

It is the same mosque, from which Uzbek prayer leader Abdul-Ghadir was removed a few days ago.

 

Some background story:

Abdul-Ghadir has publicized in a sermon that in the past weeks the Taliban have tried to file an issue against him, in order to remove him from the pulpit, even though he hadn't speak up against the "Emirate" and didn't commit any crimes. 

It was the first speech inside of Afghanistan after the Taliban takeover, in which someone publicly called the "Mujahid" (Taliban) as "Dhalim" - oppressor, which he did. He said that however big their (Taliban) power is, it is not bigger than Pharao's power and it will go down one day.

The following is the video of his speech in Farsi, where he talks about the "Mujahid" (Taliban) being against him:

Edited by lover
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On Shafaqna a similar article has been published now. And it adds that Abdul-Ghadir has been replaced as prayer leader in Takhar, North Afghanistan, by Mavlavi Abdul-Manan.

https://af.shafaqna.com/FA/498110

Abdul-Ghadir is from Uzbek ethnicity, while Mavlavi Abdul-Manan is from Pashtun ethnicity, like vast majority of the Taliban. It is needless to say that the majority of the people of North Afghanistan don’t belong to Pashtun tribe.

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Meanwhile the Taliban admit that the resistance still exists:

Lutfullah Habibi, spokesman for the Taliban Ministry of Defense, said: "Tonight, at 11:00 AM, eight fugitive thieves of the Resistance Front were killed in the Kushandeh district of Balkh province."

The National Resistance Front has not said anything about this so far. It is clear that all losses on the side of the Taliban and their allies are concealed by the Taliban themselves.

That there are anti-Taliban fighters inside Afghanistan is very clear to those who are not being blinded by Taliban propaganda.

Two statements by Afghan freedom fighters:

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Meanwhile even US president Biden has understood the problem of Afghanistan:

Some excerpts of his recent statement on Afghanistan:

"There is no way to get out of Afghanistan after 20 years easily. Not possible, no matter when you did it. And I make no apologies for what I did."

"Raise your hand if you think anyone was going to be able to unify Afghanistan under one single government? It's been the graveyard of empires for a solid reason: It is not susceptible to unity,"

His full statement:

Edited by lover
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28 minutes ago, lover said:

Meanwhile even Joe Biden has understood the problem of Afghanistan:

Some excerpts:

"There is no way to get out of Afghanistan after 20 years easily. Not possible, no matter when you did it. And I make no apologies for what I did."

"Raise your hand if you think anyone was going to be able to unify Afghanistan under one single government? It's been the graveyard of empires for a solid reason: It is not susceptible to unity,"

Salam this is just a justification  for failure of America  in Afghanistan  because  presence  of America has caused disunity in Afghanistan  also America  neither  has trained Afghanistan  military nor fixed any infrastructure  in Afghanistan  which in contrast to Mr Biden conclusion  Afghanistan  is graveyard of empires because  It's susceptible  to unity against  invaders likewise USSR & USA although  America has tried to spread hate of Iran in Afghanistan  by portraying  Iran as an Invader & Itself as protector of Afghanistan at the end America  couldn't  distract Afghan  people from standing  against  America  as an Invader.

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2 hours ago, Ashvazdanghe said:

Salam this is just a justification  for failure of America  in Afghanistan

@Ashvazdanghe

Did the U.S. really “fail” in Afghanistan? The U.S. failed to properly equip and train the Afghan military because it wanted the Taliban and their allies to return to power. It would not accept a strong Afghan leadership that would be more likely to seek friendly ties with Russia, China, Iran, and India. I would hardly call the current imbroglio a failure on the part of the U.S., but rather a success. It is only a “failure” if one accepts the American narrative that the motive for NATO’s invasion was to eliminate al-Qaida and the Taliban. If the Afghans were able to unite vs. the U.S., why have the Taliban been able to return to power, rather than anti-Taliban Afghan forces?

Edited by Northwest
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6 minutes ago, Northwest said:

If the Afghans were able to unite vs. the U.S., why have the Taliban been able to return to power, rather than anti-Taliban Afghan forces?

Because America has prepared Taliban for retaking Afghanistan but on the other hand kept anti-Taliban forces in ignoranc which Taliban has started it's retaking Afghanistan by green light  of America while shia groups have been disarmed & shia commanders have been arrested  by government of Afghanistan & Sunni Mujahidin have been busy in their territory in struggle of power between their leaders .

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When Biden is singing you know how much the pressure on him is. At least his rhetoric has changed now from 'Afghans are not fighting' to 'Afghans are not united'.

If you read the comments on Euro News' video on Taliban's visit to Norway, you will see that the majority of them have condemned Norway for that invitation of the Taliban, like "Norway I know you mean good but don’t give these terrorists what they want."

 

Edited by lover
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18 minutes ago, lover said:

When Biden is singing you know how much the pressure on him is. At least his rhetoric has changed now from 'Afghans are not fighting' to 'Afghans are not united'.

Now he wants to start war with Russia so people ignore his flaws and to look like he is "caring" person.

Even During Pandemic times, US still looking for wars. :\ 

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22 hours ago, Ashvazdanghe said:

shia groups have been disarmed & shia commanders have been arrested  by government of Afghanistan

@Ashvazdanghe

Did some of these Shia groups allow themselves to be disarmed? Disarmament seems to be a suicidal policy.

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1 hour ago, Northwest said:

@Ashvazdanghe

Did some of these Shia groups allow themselves to be disarmed? Disarmament seems to be a suicidal policy.

Hi Shia groups have not allowed disarming but ex goverment has considered Shia groups as danger to national security of Afghanistan & has sent Afghanistan army for forced disarming of Shia groups which it has caused fast approach of Taliban toward Kabul.

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Ashraf Ghani suffers stroke in Abu Dhabi

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Ashraf Ghani had experienced a stroke, local Afghan media including Herat Online telegram channel said citing an informed source in the UAE capital of Abu Dhabi. 

The BBC also confirmed the news, quoting an informed source in Abu Dhabi saying that Mohammad Ashraf Ghani suffered a stroke a few hours ago at his compound.

According to reports, Ashraf Ghani has been admitted to Sheikh Zahid Hospital after the stroke struck and is treated in the ICU.

https://en.mehrnews.com/news/183242/Ashraf-Ghani-suffers-stroke-in-Abu-Dhabi

Ashraf Ghani is  healthy

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ISNA wrote: Ashraf Ghani's brother denied the news about his brother's health condition and emphasized that he is in good health.

Heshmat Ghani, the brother of Ashraf Ghani, the former president of Afghanistan, wrote on his Twitter account: Dr. Ashraf Ghani is in good health, the rumors about his illness are made by some suspicious personalities.

An Afghan politician, chairman of the Supreme Council of Nomads and Ashraf Ghani's brother tweeted after a news item was published on the Kabul Times website about his stroke: Ashraf Ghani is in good health.

Earlier, the Kabul Times website reported the news of Ashraf Ghani's stroke, which was also confirmed by BBC sources.

https://www.khabaronline.ir/news/1596253/اشرف-غنی-در-سلامت-است

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Iran Permits Transfer of Diesel to Afghanistan

January, 23, 2022 - 15:33

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The special Iranian envoy said Tehran has given the permission to help fulfill the needs of Afghan people in the wintertime.

According to Kazemi Qomi, the three-month permission for the shipment of diesel has been granted at the request of the Afghan officials.

Under the authorization, cargoes of diesel will be transferred to Afghanistan from Iran until April 20.

https://www.tasnimnews.com/en/news/2022/01/23/2649574/iran-permits-transfer-of-diesel-to-afghanistan

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