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In the Name of God بسم الله

Miscellaneous jurisprudential questions

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We pray towards the Kaaba. Is that shirk? No. In fact, it is better to face the Kaaba when supplicating to Allah.  Please think deeply about your questions and only ask the question if it is

Everyone should have enough money to have some disposable income. And there’s nothing wrong with it. Being wealthy isn’t wrong—it’s what you do with it. 

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When you are required to stay still after Ruku before going down for sadjdah, do you have to say Sami` Allahu liman hamidah when standing and then stay still for a moment or stay still for a moment and then say Sami` Allahu liman hamidah ?

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What if someone has not sat for a moment does that person need to repeat their prayers ?

Ruling 1061. In the first and third rakʿahs, which do not have tashahhud – as is the case in the third rakʿah of ẓuhr, ʿaṣr, and ʿishāʾ prayers – the obligatory precaution is that after the second sajdah, one must sit still for a moment and then stand up. 

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How many times do I have to say this? If you mistakenly did not perform an obligatory component that is not a rukn your prayer is not invalid as long as you were not negligent in learning the Islamic laws or you are not culpably ignorant. This obligatory component is not a rukn. Furthermore this ruling is an obligatory precaution. If you are following As-Sayyid As-Sistani, you only need to follow this ruling if no other qualified marja' (that is alive) has a fatwa that differs from the obligatory precaution. Since Sheikh Wahid Khurasani, a qualified marja', has a fatwa stating that it is not obligatory to sit after the second sajdah of the 1st and 3rd rak'ah then it is not obligatory for you:

7. If an A'lam Mujtahid gives a fatwa on some matter, his follower cannot act in that matter on the fatwa of another Mujtahid. But if he does not give a fatwa, and expresses a precaution (Ihtiyat) that a man should act in such and such a manner, for exam ple if he says that as a precautionary measure, in the first and second Rak'at of the namaz he should read a complete Surah after the Surah of "Hamd", the follower may either act on this precaution, which is called obligatory precaution (Ihtiyat Wajib), or he may act on the fatwa of another Mujtahid who it is permissible to follow. Hence, if he (the second Mujtahid) rules that only "Surah Hamd" is enough, he (the person offering prayers) may drop the second Surah. The position will be the same if the A'a lam Mujtahid expresses terms like Ta'mmul or Ishkal.

https://www.sistani.org/english/book/48/2116/

1084. In the first and third rak‘ah that do not have tashahhud, such as the first and third rak‘ah of the ‘asr and ‘isha prayers, recommended precaution dictates that one should sit stationary for a moment after rising from sujud and then stand up.

Page 225, http://wahidkhorasani.com/data/books/islamic laws.pdf

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Salat uz-Zuhr must be performed before Salat ul-Asr. Salat ul-Maghrib must be performed before Salat ul-Ishaa'. The same ruling applies to qadha prayers, meaning that Salat uz-Zuhr (qadha') must be performed before Salat ul-Asr (qadha'). You can not intentionally perform them in the wrong order.

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Ok well I have performed Isha before maghrib do I need to perform it again in the right order ?

Also if you have fajr qadha, do you need to pray fajr qadha before zuhr and asr if the time for prayer has been set for zuhr and asr ?

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You can follow one marja', follow yourself (if you are a qualified mujtahid such that you can come to your own conclusions from the Quran and ahadith) or you can follow several maraja'. If you follow several marja' then you must look at all their fatawa and act on precaution. For example, if one marja' says that something is wajib and another marja' says it is mustahab, you must consider it as wajib. This can be difficult because then you have to refer to many different maraja'. This means that if you have a question you must ask each marja' or refer to each of their fatawa. It is much easier to follow just one, but this marja' must be the most learned of the maraja'. To determine who is the most learned:

3. There are three ways of identifying a Mujtahid, and the A'alam:
when a person is certain that a particular person is a Mujtahid, or the most learned one. For this, he should be a learned person himself, and should possess the capacity to identify a Mujtahid or an A'alam; when two persons, who are learned and just and possess the capacity to identify a Mujtahid or the A'alam, confirm that a person is a Mujtahid or an A'lam, provided that two other learned and just persons do not contradict them. In fact, being a Mujt ahid or an A'lam can also be established by a statement of only one trusted and reliable person; when a number of learned persons who possess the capacity to identify a Mujtahid or an A'lam, certify that a particular person is a Mujtahid or an A'lam, provided that one is satisfied by their statement.

https://www.sistani.org/english/book/48/2116/

 

3. A mujtahid or the most learned mujtahid can be identified through one of the following ways:

a. A person himself attains certainty that a particular individual is a mujtahid or the most learned one, such as a person who is of an adequate scholarly capacity to identify a mujtahid or the most learned one;

b. Two just scholars who are capable of identifying a mujtahid or the most learned one, attest that a particular individual is a mujtahid or the most learned one, provided that their testimony is not contradicted by that of two (other) just scholars. In fact, a mujtahid or the most learned one can be identified through the testimony of one trustworthy expert only when there is no reasonable doubt that his word is inaccurate;

c. A group of scholars who can identify a mujtahid or the most learned one, and their opinion brings about satisfaction, attest that an individual is a mujtahid or the most learned one.

Page 16, http://wahidkhorasani.com/data/books/islamic laws.pdf

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If you mistakenly performed Salat ul-ishaa' before Salat ul-Maghrib and then after the Salat ul-Ishaa' you realised that you have not performed Salat ul-Maghrib, then according to As-Sayyid As-Sistani and several other maraja' the prayer is valid. However, if during the prayer you realise that you haven't performed Salat ul-Maghrib yet, then if you are in the first 3 units of Salat ul-Ishaa' you must change your intention from performing Ishaa' to performing Maghrib and then continue the prayer until you have completed it and then perform Salat ul-Ishaa' afterwards. If you realise in the fourth rak'ah while standing before ruku', it is obligatory to sit back down, recite tashahhud and tasleem then perform sajda sahw for the additional standing. If you realise in the fourth rak'ah during or after ruku' then the prayer is invalid and must be performed again after Salat ul-Maghrib. If the time has passed then the prayer must be performed as qadha'.

Qadha' prayers can be performed at anytime within one's lifetime. However it is mustahab to perform it before zuhr and asr of the same day except if doing so will not allow you to perform zuhr or asr in their prime time, in which case it is mustahab to perform the zuhr or asr first and then the qadha fajr prayer.

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If you follow one of the three ways to identify the most learned marja' and come to the conclusion that As-Sayyid As-Sistani is the most learned marja', then yes you can follow him. If you do not follow any one of the three ways I previously mentioned, then no you cannot follow As-Sayyid As-Sistani but you must instead act on precaution. I suggest asking a Sheikh about who is the most learned marja' if you can.

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can we eat all vegetarian foods, i dont know if some foods can come from pigs, because the food can have milk from a cow and still be vegetarian that means they can get stuff from pigs as well without killing them, so if thats the case do we need to check everytime if the food has been made from pigs or pig enzymes ?

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Albumin The protein component of egg whites Processed foods
Anchovies Small, silver-colored fish Worcestershire sauce, Caesar salad dressing
Animal shortening Butter, suet, lard Packaged cookies and crackers, refried beans, flour tortillas,
ready-made piecrusts
Carmine (carmine cochineal or carminic acid) Red coloring made from a ground-up insect Bottled juices, colored pasta, some candies, frozen pops
Casein (caseinate) A milk protein Dairy products and some soy cheeses.
Gelatin Protein from bones, cartilage, tendons, and skin of
animals
Marshmallows, yogurt, frosted cereals, gelatin-containing
desserts
Glucose (dextrose) Animal tissues and fluids (some glucose can come from
fruits)
Baked goods, soft drinks, candies, frosting
Glycerides (mono-, di-, and triglycerides) Glycerol from animal fats or plants Processed foods
Isinglass Gelatin from the air bladder of sturgeon and other freshwater
fish
Alcoholic beverages, some jellied desserts
Lactic acid An acid formed by bacteria acting on the milk sugar
lactose
Cheese, yogurt, pickles, olives, sauerkraut, candy, frozen
desserts, fruit preserves
Lactose (saccharum lactin, D-lactose) Milk sugar As a culture medium for souring milk and in processed
foods
Lactylic stearate Salt of stearic acid (see stearic acid) As a conditioner in bread dough
Lard Fat from the abdomens of pigs Baked goods, refried beans
Lecithin Phospholipids from animal tissues, plants, and egg yolks Breakfast cereal, candy, chocolate, baked goods, margarine,
vegetable oil sprays
Lutein Deep yellow coloring from marigolds or egg yolks Commercial food coloring
Oleic acid (oleinic acid) Animal tallow Synthetic butter, cheese, vegetable fats and oils, candy, ice
cream, beverages, condiments
Pepsin Enzyme from pigs’ stomachs Cheese
Stearic acid (octadecanoic acid) Tallow, other animal fats and oils Vanilla flavoring, baked goods, beverages, candy
Suet Hard white fat around kidneys and loins of animals Margarine, mincemeat, pastries
Tallow Solid fat of sheep and cattle separated from the membranous
tissues
Margarine
Vitamin A (A1, retinol) Vitamin obtained from vegetables, egg yolks, or fish liver
oil
Vitamin supplements, fortification of foods
Vitamin B12 Vitamin produced by microorganisms and found in all animal
products; synthetic form (cyanocobalamin or cobalamin on labels) is
vegan
Supplements, fortified foods
Vitamin D3 Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) comes from fish liver oils or
lanolin
Supplements, fortified foods
Whey Watery liquid that separates from the solids in
cheese-making
Albumin The protein component of egg whites Processed foods
Anchovies Small, silver-colored fish Worcestershire sauce, Caesar salad dressing
Animal shortening Butter, suet, lard Packaged cookies and crackers, refried beans, flour tortillas,
ready-made piecrusts
Carmine (carmine cochineal or carminic acid) Red coloring made from a ground-up insect Bottled juices, colored pasta, some candies, frozen pops
Casein (caseinate) A milk protein Dairy products and some soy cheeses.
Gelatin Protein from bones, cartilage, tendons, and skin of
animals
Marshmallows, yogurt, frosted cereals, gelatin-containing
desserts
Glucose (dextrose) Animal tissues and fluids (some glucose can come from
fruits)
Baked goods, soft drinks, candies, frosting
Glycerides (mono-, di-, and triglycerides) Glycerol from animal fats or plants Processed foods
Isinglass Gelatin from the air bladder of sturgeon and other freshwater
fish
Alcoholic beverages, some jellied desserts
Lactic acid An acid formed by bacteria acting on the milk sugar
lactose
Cheese, yogurt, pickles, olives, sauerkraut, candy, frozen
desserts, fruit preserves
Lactose (saccharum lactin, D-lactose) Milk sugar As a culture medium for souring milk and in processed
foods
Lactylic stearate Salt of stearic acid (see stearic acid) As a conditioner in bread dough
Lard Fat from the abdomens of pigs Baked goods, refried beans
Lecithin Phospholipids from animal tissues, plants, and egg yolks Breakfast cereal, candy, chocolate, baked goods, margarine,
vegetable oil sprays
Lutein Deep yellow coloring from marigolds or egg yolks Commercial food coloring
Oleic acid (oleinic acid) Animal tallow Synthetic butter, cheese, vegetable fats and oils, candy, ice
cream, beverages, condiments
Pepsin Enzyme from pigs’ stomachs Cheese
Stearic acid (octadecanoic acid) Tallow, other animal fats and oils Vanilla flavoring, baked goods, beverages, candy
Suet Hard white fat around kidneys and loins of animals Margarine, mincemeat, pastries
Tallow Solid fat of sheep and cattle separated from the membranous
tissues
Margarine
Vitamin A (A1, retinol) Vitamin obtained from vegetables, egg yolks, or fish liver
oil
Vitamin supplements, fortification of foods
Vitamin B12 Vitamin produced by microorganisms and found in all animal
products; synthetic form (cyanocobalamin or cobalamin on labels) is
vegan
Supplements, fortified foods
Vitamin D3 Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) comes from fish liver oils or
lanolin
Supplements, fortified foods
Whey Watery liquid that separates from the solids in
cheese-making
Albumin The protein component of egg whites Processed foods
Anchovies Small, silver-colored fish Worcestershire sauce, Caesar salad dressing
Animal shortening Butter, suet, lard Packaged cookies and crackers, refried beans, flour tortillas,
ready-made piecrusts
Carmine (carmine cochineal or carminic acid) Red coloring made from a ground-up insect Bottled juices, colored pasta, some candies, frozen pops
Casein (caseinate) A milk protein Dairy products and some soy cheeses.
Gelatin Protein from bones, cartilage, tendons, and skin of
animals
Marshmallows, yogurt, frosted cereals, gelatin-containing
desserts
Glucose (dextrose) Animal tissues and fluids (some glucose can come from
fruits)
Baked goods, soft drinks, candies, frosting
Glycerides (mono-, di-, and triglycerides) Glycerol from animal fats or plants Processed foods
Isinglass Gelatin from the air bladder of sturgeon and other freshwater
fish
Alcoholic beverages, some jellied desserts
Lactic acid An acid formed by bacteria acting on the milk sugar
lactose
Cheese, yogurt, pickles, olives, sauerkraut, candy, frozen
desserts, fruit preserves
Lactose (saccharum lactin, D-lactose) Milk sugar As a culture medium for souring milk and in processed
foods
Lactylic stearate Salt of stearic acid (see stearic acid) As a conditioner in bread dough
Lard Fat from the abdomens of pigs Baked goods, refried beans
Lecithin Phospholipids from animal tissues, plants, and egg yolks Breakfast cereal, candy, chocolate, baked goods, margarine,
vegetable oil sprays
Lutein Deep yellow coloring from marigolds or egg yolks Commercial food coloring
Oleic acid (oleinic acid) Animal tallow Synthetic butter, cheese, vegetable fats and oils, candy, ice
cream, beverages, condiments
Pepsin Enzyme from pigs’ stomachs Cheese
Stearic acid (octadecanoic acid) Tallow, other animal fats and oils Vanilla flavoring, baked goods, beverages, candy
Suet Hard white fat around kidneys and loins of animals Margarine, mincemeat, pastries
Tallow Solid fat of sheep and cattle separated from the membranous
tissues
Margarine
Vitamin A (A1, retinol) Vitamin obtained from vegetables, egg yolks, or fish liver
oil
Vitamin supplements, fortification of foods
Vitamin B12 Vitamin produced by microorganisms and found in all animal
products; synthetic form (cyanocobalamin or cobalamin on labels) is
vegan
Supplements, fortified foods
Vitamin D3 Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) comes from fish liver oils or
lanolin
Supplements, fortified foods
Whey Watery liquid that separates from the solids in
cheese-making
Albumin The protein component of egg whites Processed foods
Anchovies Small, silver-colored fish Worcestershire sauce, Caesar salad dressing
Animal shortening Butter, suet, lard Packaged cookies and crackers, refried beans, flour tortillas,
ready-made piecrusts
Carmine (carmine cochineal or carminic acid) Red coloring made from a ground-up insect Bottled juices, colored pasta, some candies, frozen pops
Casein (caseinate) A milk protein Dairy products and some soy cheeses.
Gelatin Protein from bones, cartilage, tendons, and skin of
animals
Marshmallows, yogurt, frosted cereals, gelatin-containing
desserts
Glucose (dextrose) Animal tissues and fluids (some glucose can come from
fruits)
Baked goods, soft drinks, candies, frosting
Glycerides (mono-, di-, and triglycerides) Glycerol from animal fats or plants Processed foods
Isinglass Gelatin from the air bladder of sturgeon and other freshwater
fish
Alcoholic beverages, some jellied desserts
Lactic acid An acid formed by bacteria acting on the milk sugar
lactose
Cheese, yogurt, pickles, olives, sauerkraut, candy, frozen
desserts, fruit preserves
Lactose (saccharum lactin, D-lactose) Milk sugar As a culture medium for souring milk and in processed
foods
Lactylic stearate Salt of stearic acid (see stearic acid) As a conditioner in bread dough
Lard Fat from the abdomens of pigs Baked goods, refried beans
Lecithin Phospholipids from animal tissues, plants, and egg yolks Breakfast cereal, candy, chocolate, baked goods, margarine,
vegetable oil sprays
Lutein Deep yellow coloring from marigolds or egg yolks Commercial food coloring
Oleic acid (oleinic acid) Animal tallow Synthetic butter, cheese, vegetable fats and oils, candy, ice
cream, beverages, condiments
Pepsin Enzyme from pigs’ stomachs Cheese
Stearic acid (octadecanoic acid) Tallow, other animal fats and oils Vanilla flavoring, baked goods, beverages, candy
Suet Hard white fat around kidneys and loins of animals Margarine, mincemeat, pastries
Tallow Solid fat of sheep and cattle separated from the membranous
tissues
Margarine
Vitamin A (A1, retinol) Vitamin obtained from vegetables, egg yolks, or fish liver
oil
Vitamin supplements, fortification of foods
Vitamin B12 Vitamin produced by microorganisms and found in all animal
products; synthetic form (cyanocobalamin or cobalamin on labels) is
vegan
Supplements, fortified foods
Vitamin D3 Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) comes from fish liver oils or
lanolin
Supplements, fortified foods
Whey Watery liquid that separates from the solids in
cheese-making
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Yes, it is permitted to eat vegetarian. 

It's always a good idea to read and understand food labels if you're going to eat processed foods.

It is not permitted to claim that your religion forbids eating meat, and it is recommended but not required to eat meat at least occasionally. 

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Just be careful around cheese products as cheese counts as vegetarian as well. Some cheese products can have pork enzymes.

However, if you read "Vegan" then know it is 100% plant and you can eat anything vegan fearlessly. 

Vegetarian and Vegan are two separate things: the first includes dairy, the second abstains from every animal inclusion.

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Yes it's halal including wine vinegar.

Vinegar is produced by two successive microbial processes. The first being an alcoholic fermentation (which is Haraam) and the second an oxidation of alcohol by aceto bacter, when it’s molecular structure is changed and it ceases to be an intoxicant. Other varieties of vinegar are produced from beetroot, tarragon and alcoholic spirits. In vinegar the intoxicating factor is destroyed by the microbial process of oxidation hence it becomes permissible. Islam permits any variety of vinegar to be used as a condiment or preservative. (Muslim Food Guide – Page A26/27)

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