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In the Name of God بسم الله

Jonah / Yunus

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Hello - I have been reading about Yunus / Jonah in the Qur'an and the Bible.

I wonder if we could look at this story and talk about it together.  What does it teach about

1. God
2. Prophets
3. Ourselves

Qur'an surah 10:37,  37:139-148,  21:87&88

Bible Book of Jonah chapters 1-4

https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Jonah 1&version=NLT

Let's try and keep our comments and reactions focused on the texts and also reasonably short!!!

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Salaam

I will come to the issue of the prophet Yunus/Jonas after an important introduction.

In the semitic pattern of prophethood there is an unalterable law of God. When He sends a messenger in a people, these particular people are left with no option, but to hearken His warnings and calls during an interval of time whose expiry can not be hastened nor delayed except by Allah 15:5,16:61,53:58. Allah states about this period that His messengers show the community, starting from the leaders in mischief greatly responsible for the general moral degradation of their people down to the poorest and most insignificant elements of the community 17:16,73:11 the signs of the truth in the heavens and earth, as well as in their own deepest selves 41:53,51:27 to the point that the people must recognize it and mend their evil ways.

They are seized with affliction or tried with a sign from God when they reject the messenger 11:52-60,64-68 sent to them in order to humble themselves and mend their ways 7:94. They are urged to reason and ask for God's forgiveness lest the fate of past sinful nations each greater than other in might 43:8, befalls them. They all received God's messengers with the bayinat ie the undeniable evidence, but on account of persistent rejection, were all uprooted by a grasp so encompassing and violent that it is pictured as beginning from their foundations up

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16:26,40:22,18:55,22:42-8"And if they reject you, then already before you did the people of Nuh and Ad and Samood reject (prophets). And the people of Ibrahim and the people of Lut, As well as those of Madyan and Musa (too) was rejected, but I gave respite to the unbelievers, then did I overtake them, so how (severe) was My disapproval. So how many a town did We destroy while it was unjust, so it was fallen down upon its roofs, and (how many a) deserted well and palace raised high. Have they not travelled in the land so that they should have hearts with which to understand, or ears with which to hear? For surely it is not the eyes that are blind, but blind are the hearts which are in the breasts. And they ask you to hasten on the punishment, and Allah will by no means fail in His promise, and surely a day with your Lord is as a thousand years of what you number. And how many a town to which I gave respite while it was unjust, then I overtook it, and to Me is the return".

Mankind is continuously encouraged to research and analyse the history of past nations, unavoidably seeing in it the divine pattern. History is the only extensive evidential base for the contemplation and analysis of how societies function. Proper contemplation of that evidence leads to moral reform, providing a backround for one to test his own moral sense against that of individuals and societies of the past when faced with similar situations. The past causes the present, and so the future.

This shows that even in this life, the Creator's relationship with man is not merely based on the physical law, as with other creatures devoid of moral accountability and freewill. The moral law is working side by side with it. Sometimes that higher reality is clearer than at other times, and the clearest manifestation of it is during the times of the prophets. Past nations to whom messengers were sent become means by which the evidence for the hereafter is presented. If moral acts have results in this world, and these results never manifest fully in the world, then it necessitates that another world must exist where the consequences of sin and righteousness will fully appear. 
 
Some of these nations completely mend their ways during their time of respite and prior to their annihilation by Divine affliction, as happenned in the prophet Jonas' lifetime during which they all believed

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10:98"When they believed, We removed from them the chastisement of disgrace in this world's life and We gave them provision till a time".

If they dont and in addition try uprooting or killing the messengers sent to them with the undeniable bayinat, continuously oppose them and conspire against them to prevent the establishement of the way of God 42:13 then those pinpointed as the guilty ones by the prophets 44:22 in these nations will incure Divine affliction. They may be put to the sword by the believers themselves as in Moses and Muhammad's time, or completely annihilated by natural cataclysms. At other times God might send a powerful ennemy to bring destruction as happened to the Israelites that rejected Jesus, or they are subjugated to the followers of the messengers for generations to come. Concerning this reality, the Psalmist states

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Ps46:9"Go and see the works of the Lord, that He has wrought devastation in the earth".

Allah in the Quran alludes to all these potential outcomes, including the one that will be inflicted upon the rejecters of the prophet Muhammad, similarly to what He had decreed in the times of Moses

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6:65-7"Say: "He has the power that He should send on you a chastisement from above you or from beneath your feet, or that He should throw you into confusion, (making you) of different parties; and make some of you taste the fighting of others." See how repeatedly We display the signs that they may understand. And your people call it a lie and it is the very truth. Say: "I am not placed in charge of you." For every prophecy is a term and you will come to know (it)".

 

Besides the people of Jonas/Yunus practically all nations to whom messengers were sent with such warnings faced the punishment of death and sometimes complete annihilation as described for the messengers of old throughout sura 7 and

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11,26,29,40:5,14:13-15,58:5"Surely those who act in opposition to Allah and His Messenger shall be laid down prostrate as those before them were laid down prostrate; and indeed We have revealed clear communications, and the unbelievers shall have an abasing chastisement" 26:208-9"And We did not destroy any town but it had (its) warners, To remind, and We are never unjust".

This divine scourge does not befall the sinful nation so long as all the righteous and the prophets have fled the land 4:165,8:33,11:58,12:110,17:15,19:46-50,20:77,28:59.

In my view, the story of this prophet and how the divine punishement was averted reflects God's mercy. He does not wish for the destruction of His creatures, even the sinful ones, and therefore sends messengers to make them mend their ways. The people are given reasonable time to present all their objections to these messengers and make up their minds. Meanwhile the messengers and their followers must show patience and forbearance in the face of hostility because God will not immediately punish the disbelievers and the guilty as long as there is still time for them to receive the message, contemplate upon it and reform themselves. It is a time of training and purification to the believers, during which the messengers do their utmost with God's guidance to make good and bad, truth and falsehood perfectly clear

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17:15"..nor do We chastise until We raise a messenger" 8:33"nor is Allah going to chastise them while yet they ask for forgiveness".

The Messengers are a means of communicating the truth of God in such an ultimate form to their addressees that they are left with no legitimate excuse to deny it, especially considering the perseverance of their prophets with the hope of bringing them back from their spiritual degeneration 46:27. If their efforts are unable to influence them, then it only means that nothing can change and reform them. The messengers therefore remove all excuses the rejecters might have on the Day of Resurrection

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20:134"And had We destroyed them with chastisement before this, they would certainly have said: O our Lord! why didst Thou not send to us a messenger, for then we should have followed Thy communications before that we met disgrace and shame" and any excuse they might have for the just punishement they will imminently face in this world for their rejection 21:109"But if they turn back, say: I have given you warning in fairness and I do not know whether what you are threatened with is near or far".

Now we come to another lesson from the story of Yunus.

This particular point of warning the nation to an extent that its continuous rejection becomes inexcusable before the sending of the divine scourge, is demonstrated through an incident in his story. Yunus left his people/qawm in wrath thinking the time of the divine chastisement had come due to their refusal to hearken his repeated calls. But he was stopped in his journey by God Himself who mercifully returned him to his people, because their time of respite hadnt expired, their full spiritual potential was still not completely expressed. Sure enough, they ultimately all ended up believing in him before the sending of the scourge 10:98,21:87-8,37:139-148. The manner in which Yunus was brought back to his people was nothing short of miraculous, a display of God's favor to the righteous and pious, another lesson from the story.  After he was designated as the one to be thrown to the sea by the boat's crew members, he was swallowed by a sea creature, and would have tarried in it till the day of resurrection in the way we see up to this day the remarkably intact fossilized remains of several millions years old sea creatures, including of their belly's contents. But the fish was made to take him back to a specific location, regurgitate him after several days, and a type of vegetation made to grow over him that he might recover from the ordeal and be protected. It was probably the sight of his miraculous return that deeply struck the people's hearts and made them understand God's loving mercy to all His creatures, that He would send His own prophet to the brink of death and back for the sake of avoiding an ungrateful nation's destruction. 

In the Hebrew Bible, Jonas is a Jewish prophet reluctant to go on a warning mission to the non-Jewish town of Nineveh in Assyria (equated with present day Mosul in Iraq), as bidden by God, as well as unwilling to see them mend their evil ways since their safeguard from their impending doom would make them remain a constant threat to the Israelites. He therefore escaped on a ship but was eventually cast out by the crew in order to stop the raging storm sent by God, swallowed alive by a large fish in which he remained 3 days and nights, then following his prayers was ejected on dry land. This time Jonas hearkened God's instructions and went back to Nineveh to convey the Divine message. The people of the town, from its king to the populace accepted the warning, repented and mended their ways, which caused the punishement to be averted, contrary to Jonas' wish who had hoped for their doom. 

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On 2/17/2021 at 4:54 PM, Nad_M said:

In my view, the story of this prophet and how the divine punishement was averted reflects God's mercy. He does not wish for the destruction of His creatures, even the sinful ones, and therefore sends messengers to make them mend their ways. The people are given reasonable time to present all their objections to these messengers and make up their minds. Meanwhile the messengers and their followers must show patience and forbearance in the face of hostility because God will not immediately punish the disbelievers and the guilty as long as there is still time for them to receive the message, contemplate upon it and reform themselves. It is a time of training and purification to the believers, during which the messengers do their utmost with God's guidance to make good and bad, truth and falsehood perfectly clear

Thank you for your contribution.  You obviously put in a lot of work to produce so much material.  There is so much to think about in what you have said.

I'm sorry I mentioned a wrong referencein the Qur'an it should have been 10:98 I have subsiquently found another reference to the story 68:48-50.

Reading the verses in the Qur'an I find it hard to put the story together.

From 10:98 and 37:147 &148 God sent Jonah to preach to a disbelieving people and after he preached they repented and their punishment was averted for a time.  We find this too in the Bible story Jonah 3:1-10.

I see here that God is merciful he does not want people to be punished and gives them opportunities to repent.  Even though these people were evil and enemies against his followers.

I see that prophets can disobey God Q 37:142 says 'while he was blameworthy' and Q 21:87 'I have been of the wrongdoers'  In the Bible Jonah 1:3 'Jonah ran away from the Lord' (also Q 37:140) and 4:1 he was angry with God.

God is patient - he gives Jonah a second chance even in his disobedience Q 68:49 God's favour was on him even while he was 'censured' The provison of the fish is a sign of this.

For people like us I see hope - If we call out to God even in the darkness (Q 21:87 Joanh chapter 2) and in our sin and repent, God will save us from our distress Q 21:88

It is not clear from the Qur'an why God sent the plant - maybe to help Jonah recover. (Q 37:146) In the Bible the plant comes at the end of the story and shows us that God enages with us in conversation and living examples to help us to understand his love and mercy.

I'm sure there is a lot more we can talk about

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On 2/22/2021 at 12:33 PM, Dave follower of The Way said:

Reading the verses in the Qur'an I find it hard to put the story together.

The Quranic style is not that of story telling. One doesn't focus on the storyline but on the message relevant to its direct context. Repetitions in the Quran become full of meaning when one appreciates that basic Quranic style. Some passages are repeated word for word, in the case of prayers or general pillars of faith but in story telling, the repetitions are rarely if ever the same. This is because in the Quran when it comes to reminding of past narratives and anectodes, the objective isnt dry storytelling and genealogies as in most of the Bible where one can easily and quickly lose track of names, places and other details. These little details, if omitted wouldn't make humanity miss out on anything in terms of guidance, and in fact confuse the reader and distract his attention to trivial matters.

The Quran is not a historical record or dry, impartial document: it is argumentative and impactful to get people to believe and actively reform themselves and their environement. Its aim is "message telling" and maximizing its audience's attention to the precept(s) of the story. Muslims will not be asked on the Day of Judgment the details of the people of the cave or how Noah's flood occured, how many generations passed between a person and another, the names in a genealogy or whether they memorized the names of people in the Quran. They will be questioned as to how they responded to the lessons from the different incidents and stories related in the Quran. Thus to focus on the message, the Quran injects the passage of a well-known story, whenever the larger context a sura requires it. And when it does so, it only puts the details of that story that are relevant to that specific context. That is why one sees variations in repetitions, but never contradictions. The only exception to that style of narrative is the story of the prophet Joseph/Yusuf which takes the form of a beginning to end narrative in one place, and a highly eloquent, intricate one at that. 

Those unable to apreciate that Quranic style speak of contradictory, or incomplete repetitions. This is because first and foremost they approach the Quranic text with the above Biblical paradigm in mind; the Quran, instead of being read on its own is seen as a garbled version of multiple Judeo-Christian sources. If, however, the text is approached according to its own thematic unities, its lack of historical detail and absence of chronological order become unproblematic. And this is the prevalent approach among western scholarship nowadays.

The second common problem for those reading the text occurs when they are unable to connect the different repetitions properly among one another and fail to grasp the manner in which each repetition fits in the context of a particular sura. These repetitions always retain a core meaning, and are always thematically correlated with similar passages in other suras, like conversations and dialogues between the suras. The brilliant pakistani scholar Islahi called the recurrence of themes in several suras "complementarity". 

What is remarkable from a linguistic perspective is that the Quran was uttered publicly, live and as a speech, which prevents any type of editing and yet it forms one incredibly well knit whole, from verse to verse, paragraph to pararaph, sura to sura. If we take the example of sura baqara, the longest of all and revealed over the course of 10 years while other suras were being simultaneously revealed, it is structured in an interconnected manner allowing it to be thematically structured in many different ways.

This is a vast field of Quranic studies, with many sub-branches, studied by both Muslims and non-Muslim scholars; the interconnection between suras, passages, verses, words and even letters and how the whole thing remarkably fits together. The idea of the Quran being a dull, boring or incomprehensible repetitive book is a discredited proposition, not only by the scholars of Islam all throughout their exegetical works spanning centuries, but also more recently by non-Muslims who have been doing, and keep on doing, a remarkable job at unveiling the intricate connections of the text, from verse to another, paragraph to paragraph and sura to sura. See Norman Brown's work on sura 18 for instance. That weak assertion is only still circulating among uneducated critics of Islam, and missionaries. For most of modern Islamicists, the Quran has to be approached as a text on its own, with its own internal coherence to be properly understood. So long as explanations to its passages are sought from the perspective of its alleged, ellusive and countless proposed sources, the Quran will remain an obscure book for those approaching it.

On 2/22/2021 at 12:33 PM, Dave follower of The Way said:

I see that prophets can disobey God Q 37:142 says 'while he was blameworthy' and Q 21:87 'I have been of the wrongdoers'  In the Bible Jonah 1:3 'Jonah ran away from the Lord' (also Q 37:140) and 4:1 he was angry with God.

God is patient - he gives Jonah a second chance even in his disobedience Q 68:49 God's favour was on him even while he was 'censured' The provison of the fish is a sign of this.

For people like us I see hope - If we call out to God even in the darkness (Q 21:87 Joanh chapter 2) and in our sin and repent, God will save us from our distress Q 21:88

In the Arabic, none of these verses denote willful disobedience to God, or sin. All they speak of is Yunus' own feelings of regrets. When he left his people, he was angry and in haste. No indication in the text points to disobedience as the cause. He thought the time of respite had expired and the prophecied punishement was imminent due to the people's rejection of him. This can be inferred from the Arabic describing the manner in which he fled 3:140, as if he was running away from danger, catching a boat that was just about to leave port, fully loaded to the point that shortly after, lots had to be cast to release some weight into the sea.

It is inferred as well by his anger 21:87 which he thought was reason enough to justify leaving prior to being commanded by God "he went away in wrath, so he thought that We would not straiten him". His regrets occurred when he realized he had misjudged the situation. He neither failed in the transmission of God's message nor in his obedience to God. In his anger, he assumed the time had come for him to escape that land, and that God would approve of his judgement even though he was not yet authorized to leave. 

 

On 2/22/2021 at 12:33 PM, Dave follower of The Way said:

It is not clear from the Qur'an why God sent the plant - maybe to help Jonah recover. (Q 37:146) In the Bible the plant comes at the end of the story and shows us that God enages with us in conversation and living examples to help us to understand his love and mercy.

Although the Quran does not dwell into the purpose of the plant, it can be inferred that it was a means of soothing Yunus. It comes right after mentioning his poor physical state, following his ordeal in the belly of the fish. One can imagine him cast off on the shore and exhausted. The plant offered him both a comforting shade and sustenance while he was recovering. It is to be noted that the type of plant is different in both scriptures. In the Quran it is a kind of crawling plant like watermelon, cucumber etc. This crawling plant was "over him" meaning he spent some time lying down under it, recovering. The concise and eloquent description fits the story well. In the Bible, the plant is more like a tree and served Jonah a moral lesson in regards to God's mercy, even to those people he was reluctant to preach to. Both stories do not contradict from that aspect and could be speaking of different occasions.

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Having only read the OP so far and then the Book of Jonah, these are my initial thoughts:

The NLT is kinda jazzed-up when compared to -yes,l read all four translations side by side-  Young's Literal, Douay-Rheims and the KJV.

The NlT has "captain"  for "shipmaster"

The NLT has "offended the gods" for a paganizing that is textually unsupported, for "this evil".

Similarly, the NLT has "false gods" instead of "vanities".

The NLT substitutes "nationality" for "occupation" (Nationalism as we think of it did not start until Napoleon and French Revolution)

In verse 1:13, is Jonah suicidal?

The translations have "fish" --so where does the mammal whale come from? And do not the characteristics of the story more reminiscent of a diving bell (like Alexander who-tried-to-look-great used) ?

When Jonah is cast into the water, this is more dramatic than Matthew 8:27 -and a good commentary.

The "sitting in ashes" and "sackcloth" were lsraeli customs and have nothing to do with the 10 Commandments which is no where inferred in this story --as should be. The God of Noah -(سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى). no where reveals that He -(سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى). wants to see people humiliate themselves. Only to believe and behave.

The NLT has "overthrown" for "overturned"(Like the 'cities of the plain') 

So why did the OP chose the NLT ?

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The OP citations of Quran:

Ayat 10:37 What is "confirmed" is that the message of all Messengers -(عليه السلام). has been to believe in the God of Noah -(سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى). alone and not to associate anything with Him -(سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى).

Ayats 37:139-148 is the same basic story of Yunus/Jonah -(عليه السلام). and the fish and was sent to a city (which one not specified) as in the 0.T.

Ayats 21:87-88  Dhun-Nun is traditionally assumed to be Yunus -(عليه السلام). but there is no agreed to identification and only lmam Mahdi will announce whom it is and why.

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On 2/17/2021 at 11:54 AM, Nad_M said:

Some of these nations completely mend their ways during their time of respite and prior to their annihilation by Divine affliction, as happenned in the prophet Jonas' lifetime during which they all believed

Quote

You did not quote the entire ayat.  You also should have written 'one people' and not "some of these nations", because as revealed, only one did. The people of Yunus -(عليه السلام).

 

On 2/17/2021 at 11:54 AM, Nad_M said:

Mankind is continuously encouraged to research and analyse the history of past nations,

Those that were destroyed.

ln general, you have lost Quranic accuracy by trying to embellish around what is revealed, inshallah.

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5 hours ago, hasanhh said:

You did not quote the entire ayat.

The part quoted was relevant to what was said prior

 

5 hours ago, hasanhh said:

You also should have written 'one people' and not "some of these nations", because as revealed, only one did. The people of Yunus -(عليه السلام).

Correct, but there is a nuance. Although the Quran does not give any other such examples, it is to be kept in mind that only a fraction of the messengers sent to mankind, and their stories, are mentioned in the Book 40:78. 

 

6 hours ago, hasanhh said:

Those that were destroyed.

The Israelites are among those living examples whose history the Quran continuously points to

 

6 hours ago, hasanhh said:

ln general, you have lost Quranic accuracy by trying to embellish around what is revealed, inshallah.

Can you point such embellishments

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11 hours ago, hasanhh said:

So why did the OP chose the NLT ?

Thanks for your input.  I feel that instead of engaging with the text you have picked out a minor point.  I chose a link from Biblegateway completly at random it could just as well have been NIV or KJV.  What I was concerned with is the story - the overall message.  I'm glad you read the story in different translations - it helps us to see the challenges of translation and can sometimes help us to get a different dimention on the message.

9 hours ago, hasanhh said:

Ayats 37:139-148 is the same basic story of Yunus/Jonah -(عليه السلام). and the fish and was sent to a city (which one not specified) as in the 0.T.

What impression did you get from the story?  What did you learn about God, prophets, and people?

How can we use the story and the different accounts in our lives today?  How do the passages challenge us in our daily relationship with God?

I would value your thoughts and look forward to your comments - God bless us as we read this example of his interaction with people.

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13 hours ago, Nad_M said:

The Quranic style is not that of story telling. One doesn't focus on the storyline but on the message relevant to its direct context.

I find your explination of how to read and approach the Qur'an very helpful.  Yes I too try to read it as a whole and seek to study the ayet in the context of the chapter.  So, in a way, I have gone against this by just picking the Jonah verses rather than including context.   However, I think there is value in drawing together themes and comminalities.

13 hours ago, Nad_M said:

They will be questioned as to how they responded to the lessons from the different incidents and stories related in the Quran.

I would disagree that stories are dry and boring - I think this one in the Bible is well writen and quite engaging and obviously came out of an oral storytelling culture.  But you are correct God is looking for how we respond to the lessons to be found in the accounts rather than the details themselves.

So how do we respond?  What do we learn?

You commmented that "none of these verses denote willful disobedience to God, or sin."  However, if, as you suggest, the first listeners would have known the Hebrew text story of Jonah, the illusion would have clearly caused people to remember that Jonah "ran away" (Q 37:140) from God's command going in completly the opposite direction.  I wonder if we have every felt God calling us to do something.  You suggest that the Qur'an indicates that God wanted him to stay longer, where the Bible indicates that he refused the initial call.  What ever it was what about us?  I know sometimes God asks me to do something and I don't do it.  How does this story help us in that situation?

This story tells me that God wants people - groups of people, cities, nations - to turn to him and find his gift of forgiveness and new life.  If it was true at the time of Jonah, then it is true today.  So, what am I doing about this desire God has that people would know him and follow him?

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4 hours ago, Nad_M said:

The part quoted was relevant to what was said prior Correct, but there is a nuance. Although the Quran does not give any other such examples, it is to be kept in mind that only a fraction of the messengers sent to mankind, and their stories, are mentioned in the Book 40:78. Ayat 10:98 "except one, the People of Jonah". There is nothing nuanced about this. Ayat 40:78 does not apply because the Quran reveals that it is "consistent". Therefore, when Ayat 10:98 reveals "except one" this will include the unrevealed stories.

 

The Israelites are among those living examples whose history the Quran continuously points to So, within this discussion, what is the relevance?

 

Can you point such embellishments Your unsubstantiated claims and assertions.

Reply in bold face type.

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2 hours ago, Dave follower of The Way said:

completely at random

This is only applicable to statistical sampling. Not in-depth studies.

2 hours ago, Dave follower of The Way said:

What impression did you get from the story?

Mostly, how it applies to Matthew 12:41 ; 16:4 and Luke 11:30. When you read "sign" think "as a comparison"/a comparative. Remember, at that time, lsa -(عليه السلام). was in Messenger mode and next time he -(عليه السلام). will be in Messiah mode. As revealed in Quran and recorded in O.T. Jonah -(عليه السلام). was believed. ln lsa's -(عليه السلام). first time, he -(عليه السلام). was not believed except by a few.

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4 hours ago, hasanhh said:

Ayat 10:98 "except one, the People of Jonah". There is nothing nuanced about this. Ayat 40:78 does not apply because the Quran reveals that it is "consistent". Therefore, when Ayat 10:98 reveals "except one" this will include the unrevealed stories.

Sure, no nation believed in its entirety prior to the punishement except that of Yunus. Now, does that negation apply to those spoken of in the Quran only, or does it include all nations to whom messengers were sent, including the vast majority whose stories are omitted from the Quran? The verse does not explicitly include those omitted stories in the negation. The only certainty is that none among those mentioned in the Quran believed prior to the punishment, while among the omitted stories there is no certainty. 

 

4 hours ago, hasanhh said:

So, within this discussion, what is the relevance?

Your argument switched from, the Quran pointing only to the history of the destroyed nations, which was false, to whether a living nation whose history and its moral lessons is stamped all over the Quran, is relevancy to the discussion. It is relevant to the passage from which you took it, read it again.

 

4 hours ago, hasanhh said:

Your unsubstantiated claims and assertions

At best, you've shown one ambiguous understanding in 10:98. Where are these other unsubstantiated claims and assertions

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l did some reseach. ln the Wikipedia article, the ancient cities that had (in estimation) 100k people or more are:

2100 BCC   Ur

1650    "      Avaris

1375    "      Thebes

1300    "      Yinxu

1200    "      Pi-Ramzes

1000   "       Xian

1000   "       Luoyang

900    "       Haojing

700    "       Babylon and Nineveh

400    "       Xiadu

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@Nad_M and @hasanhh

Thanks for joining in this thread looking at the story of Yunus/Jonah.

We seem to have wandered from the story to an area I don't feel qualified to contribute.  I think there is a lot more in this story that we can apply to ourselves as we think about God and the world.

I find this verse in Qur'an 21 interesting

And (mention) Dhu'n-Nun, when he went off in anger and deemed that We had no power over him, but he cried out in the darkness, saying: There is no Allah save Thee. Be Thou Glorified! Lo! I have been a wrong-doer. Then we heard his prayer and saved him from the anguish. Thus we save believers.

Okay there are questions whether Dhu'n-Nun is Yunus/Jonah but I wonder if we ever fall into the catogory where we think that God won't notice or punish us.

Yet slowly or quickly we end up in darkness.  I find comfort in the assurence that God hears the cry of the penitant - "I have been a wrong doer" - and rescues them.

"Lord rescue me when I go astray!"

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