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In the Name of God بسم الله

What’s the difference between a moderate and a reformist.?

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I’m becoming les conservative. I no longer believe that hijab is a requirement And probably won’t require my spouse to wear one. I do believe my beard is a requirement.I wear Western clothes which are traditional for me considering I’m a western revert. 

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3 minutes ago, musa shakr said:

I’m becoming les conservative. I no longer believe that hijab is a requirement And probably won’t require my spouse to wear one. I do believe my beard is a requirement.I wear Western clothes which are traditional for me considering I’m a western revert. 

I didn't get the question exactly. 

But what is your definition of a moderate and a reformist?

According to mine, I favor the second one.

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6 minutes ago, Zainuu said:

I didn't get the question exactly. 

But what is your definition of a moderate and a reformist?

According to mine, I favor the second one.

I was asking what your definition of a moderate and reformers is and how they differ.

Edited by musa shakr
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A reformist wants to change Islam in order to improve it (according to what their perceptions of improvement are). An example of a reformist is Muhammad Ibn Abdul Wahhab, who wanted to reform Islam to what he thought it originally should have been. The word usually has negative connotations amongst the muslim community today, since it is usually associated with “Islamic” modernism, Liberalism or progressivism and these sorts of Muslims usually discard clear-cut teachings within the Qur’an and Ahadith. In the words of Shaykh Abdul Hakim Murad, “Which is the bigger prison: Islam in the eyes of modernity, or modernity in the eyes of Islam?”

A moderate Muslim is commonly seen as one who does not fall into extremities. One of the meanings could be a Muslim who isn’t too religious, but still holds onto faith. As a side note, it is unfortunate that contemporary political discourse coins the term “extremist” when describing terrorist “Muslims” and “moderate” when describing peaceful Muslims, whilst the reverse is true (the more extreme of a muslim you are, the more peaceful or “at peace” you should be).

Another definition of a moderate Muslim which I would support, is related to the islamic concept of wasatiyyah. Islam describes itself as the “middle way”. The Holy Qur’an says: “Thus We have made you a middle nation [ummatun wasat] that you may be witnesses to the people, and that the Apostle may be a witness to you.” (2:143). The Prophet Muhammad (صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم) is also described as a man of medium build and complexion (fair with slight redness), with a symmetrical body and wavy hair (neither curly nor straight); thus, a manifestation of the Middle Way.

My opinion on such matters is that instead of reforming Islam and forcing it to be compatible with modernism, implying that Islam is a superstition that has become outdated, one needs to consistently renew and promote the true teachings of the Prophet Muhammad (صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم) and his holy progeny (عليه السلام). The former will only result in nihilism, individualism, egoism and Satanism.

:ws:

 

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Muslims shouldn't worry too much about these things. Keep following islam and what god wants us to follow, if Allah wants us to wear hijab then we should, its not a matter of conservative or liberal. There's only "muslim" and "less/flawed Muslim"

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2 hours ago, musa shakr said:

I was asking what your definition of a moderate and reformers is and how they differ.

Moderate is someone who doesn't presses hard upon religious laws. In simple terms, he is someone who wants to stay neutral in life. Silent and will never allow himself to be in dangers because of religion. In simple words, he lives with the system and tries to bring harmony between his faith and his other world by prioritizing life over faith.

Reformers are those who bring change by changing themselves. Those who give priority to there principles rather than system. They are generally leaders whereas moderates are generally followers.

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3 hours ago, musa shakr said:

I’m becoming les conservative. I no longer believe that hijab is a requirement And probably won’t require my spouse to wear one. I do believe my beard is a requirement.I wear Western clothes which are traditional for me considering I’m a western revert. 

These are pretty problematic terms because it forces Islam into the Western modern paradigm. Such a case becomes difficult because Islam was only introduced to western thinking through colonization in just a century ago (or so), so these attempts at conceiving a conservative, liberal, moderate, etc. "Muslim" is awkward. I know tons of people do it, but they should know that it really doesn't make much sense and if they have respect to this religious tradition they'd abandon it. 

This doesn't mean that diversity within religious thought has never been there. You thinking the hijab is necessary isn't at all weird. As Leila Ahmed writes, the hijab only became a serious religious question after colonization. Pushed primarily by the West. 

Edited by BleedKnee
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I think there is a difference between moderate and less/non-practicing Muslim. A non-practicing knows the rules but decides not to follow them either out of laziness or ignorance. A moderate consciously decides not to follow certain rules or to "soften" them in order to adhere to another status quo or ideology, in our case it's Western liberalism. So moderation is relative I think. 

13 hours ago, BleedKnee said:

These are pretty problematic terms because it forces Islam into the Western modern paradigm. Such a case becomes difficult because Islam was only introduced to western thinking through colonization in just a century ago (or so), so these attempts at conceiving a conservative, liberal, moderate, etc. "Muslim" is awkward. I know tons of people do it, but they should know that it really doesn't make much sense and if they have respect to this religious tradition they'd abandon it.

Case in point.

Edited by Berber-Shia
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