Jump to content
Guests can now reply in ALL forum topics (No registration required!) ×
Guests can now reply in ALL forum topics (No registration required!)
In the Name of God بسم الله

What is the deeper meaning of SubhanAllah, Alhamdulillah, Lailahailla Allah, Allahu Akbar?

Rate this topic


Recommended Posts

  • Veteran Member

:salam:

I know the shorter meanings:

SubhanAllah - Glory be to God

Alhamdulillah - Praise be to God

Lailaha illa Allah - There is no god (ilah) but God (Allah)

Allahu Akbar - God is greater 

 

However, I am looking for the deeper, in-depth meanings. Please link any lectures, articles, hadiths. 

For example, regarding Allahu Akbar we have the following hadith:

image.png.9e1959591178ead289e700df92d1d5f1.png

Barakallahu Feek.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Veteran Member

Salam,

I believe the moment a person reads those verses, he detaches himself from the physical world and enter into the Mercy of Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى). His souls leave the body and returns to his Rabb.

If he says Lailaha illa Allah, and followed by Muhammadur Rasulullah,

He returns with Muhammad to his Rabb.

Wallahualam...

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Veteran Member

In addition,

While in the returning journey to the Rabb with Muhammad using those verses, we will not be alone.  We are with Ahlulbayt.  

Don't forget to read (after reading those verses)..

Assalamualaika Ya Rasulullah,

Assalamualaika Ya Amerul Mukminin

...Fatimatul Zahra...Hasaan Mujtaba.. Hussain Seyyedul Shuhada....... plus all the Prophets, Angels, Walis, shuhadas....

All the above sojls are also on board.

All these verses below are very important and keys to unseen (Akhirat)...final destination.

15 hours ago, 313_Waiter said:

 

SubhanAllah - Glory be to God

Alhamdulillah - Praise be to God

Lailaha illa Allah - There is no god (ilah) but God (Allah)

Allahu Akbar - God is greater 

One of the reason that salam to Prophet and His Family is WAJIB toward the end of Salah (prayer)...because Salah is a returning journey to our Rabb and we are not alone.  We are in Jamaah (congregation).

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Advanced Member
2 hours ago, layman said:

One of the reason that salam to Prophet and His Family is WAJIB toward the end of Salah (prayer)...because Salah is a returning journey to our Rabb and we are not alone.  We are in Jamaah (congregation)

Wow! 

Yes makes sense as the rising from second sajdah represents coming out of the grave. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Veteran Member

From At Tauheed by Sheikh Sadooq (translation by Maulana Ali Raza Rizvi):

Chapter Forty-Five: Ma`na Subhan Allah The Meaning of “Glory be to Allah”. – 2 traditions

1. `Abd ibn Muhammad ibn `Abd al-Wahhab al-Sajzi said in Naysabur that Abu al-Hasan Ahmad ibn Muhammad ibn `Abd Allah ibn Hamzah al-Sha`rani al-`Ammari from the children of `Ammar ibn Yasir (may Allah have mercy on him) said: Abu Muhammad `Ubayd Allah ibn Yahya ibn `Abd al-Baqi, al-Adhani said in Adhanah that `ali ibn al-Hasan al-Ma`ani said: `Abd Allah ibn Yazid related to, on the authority of Yahya ibn `Uqbah ibn Abu al-`Ayzar that Muhammad ibn Hajjar said, on the authority of Yazid ibn al-Asamm that

 

A man asked `Umar ibn al-Khattab, “O Commander of the Faithful! What is the meaning of `Glory be to Allah’ [subhan Allah]?”

He replied, “Verily, there is a man within these walls who informs when asked, and informs when there is silence.”

So the man entered and it was `Ali ibn Abu Talib (AS); hence, he asked, “O Fater of Hasan! What is the meaning of `Glory be to Allah’?”

He (عليه السلام) answered, “It is revering the Glory of Allah, the Mighty and High, and deanthropomorphising Allah from what the infidels say about Him. Therefore, when a servant says this, all the angels bless him.”

2. My father (رضي الله عنه) said: `Ali ibn Ibrahim said, on the authority of Muhammad ibn `Isa ibn `Ubayd, on the authority of Yunus ibn `Abd al-Rahman, on the authority Hisham ibn al-Hakam that

I asked Abu `Abd Allah al-Sadiq (عليه السلام) about the expression `Glory be to Allah.’

Thus, he (عليه السلام) replied, “Pride belongs to Allah, the Mighty and High.”

3. Muhammad ibn Musa ibn al-Mutawakkil (رضي الله عنه) said: `Ali ibn al-Husayn al-Sa`dabadi said, on the authority of Ahmad ibn Abu `Abd Allah al-Barqi, on the authority of `Abd al-`Azim ibn `Abd Allah al-Hasani, on the authority of `Ali ibn Asbat, on the authority of Sulayman freed slave of Tirbal, on the authority of Hisham al-Jawaliqi that

 I asked Abu `Abd Allah al-Sadiq (عليه السلام), “What was meant by the words of Allah, the

Mighty, and High: `Glory be to Allah?” He (عليه السلام) explained, “His deanthropomorphism”.

 

Chapter Forty-Six: Ma`na Allahu Akbar The Meaning of Allah is the Greatest – 2 traditions

 

1. Ahmad ibn Muhammad ibn Yahya la-`Attar (رضي الله عنه) said: My father said, on the authority of Sahl ibn Ziyad al-Adami, on the authority of Ibn Mahbub, on the authority of who related to him that

A man came to al-Sadiq (عليه السلام) and said: “Allah is the Greatest [Allahu Akbar]!” The Imam (عليه السلام) asked him, “What is Allah greater than?”

The man answered, “Greater than everything!”

Al-Sadiq (عليه السلام) replied, “You have brought Allah down to the level of a door.” The requested, “What should I say then?”

He (عليه السلام) said: “Say Allah is greater than anything that can be described.”

 

2. Muhammad ibn Hasan ibn Ahmad ibn Walid (رضي الله عنه) said: Muhammad ibn Yahya al-`Attar said, on the authority of Ahmad ibn Muhammad ibn `Isa, on the authority of his father, on the authority of Muruk ibn `Ubayd, on the authority of Jumay’ ibn `Amr that

Al-Sadiq (عليه السلام) asked me “What is the meaning of `Allahu Akbar’?”

I replied, “Allah is greater than everything.”

He (عليه السلام) said: “He was there when nothing existed. Then was it possible to say at that time that Allah is greater than everything?”

I asked, “Then what is its meaning?”

He replied, “Allah is greater than what He can be attributed with.”

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Veteran Member

Page 194 regarding the Face of Allah:

Quote

Salman al-Farisi (may Allah have mercy on him) related the coming of the Catholicos [al-jathiliq] to Medina with one hundred Christians after the death of the Prophet (SA), and the questions he asked Abu Bakr, and which he was unable to answer. The Catholicos was then sent to the Commander of the Faithful `Ali ibn Abu Talib (عليه السلام) and asked him about them; therefore, he answered him. Among the questions he asked him was: “Inform me about the face [wajh] of the Lord, the Blessed and Exalted.” Hence, `Ali (عليه السلام) called for some fire and dry wood and then set fire to it. When it blazed, `Ali (عليه السلام) asked, “Where is the face of this fire?” The Christian replied, “It has a face from all sides.” `Ali (عليه السلام) responded, “This fire is supervised and produced yet its face is not know, while its Creator does not resemble it. And Allah’s is the East and the West, therefore, whither you turn, thither is the Face of Allah. No secret is hidden from our Lord.”
The Compiler of this book says: The tradition is detailed; we have extracted from it the required passage.

Full book pdf (with Arabic): http://jaffaribooks.com/books/Tawhid sadooq english final.pdf

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest FuLaN
On 1/9/2021 at 3:45 AM, 313_Waiter said:

:salam:

I know the shorter meanings:

SubhanAllah - Glory be to God

Salam,

These are not "deep" meanings but they give basic implications of the differences between these various formulae. 

Subhanallah emphasizes tanzih (God's remoteness, distance, incomparability, wrath, majesty).

Alhamulillah emphasizes tashbih (God's proximity, nearness, similarity, mercy and beauty),

The above two oft-repeated Arabic formulas are seem as complementary.  Notice the context in which Muslims often use these formulas and then the meaning will become clear.

Finally we have

La ilaha iIla Allah.

Literally:  la (no) ilaha (God), in-la (if not), Allah (God). 

There are two parts to the shahada, each of which is composed of two words.

1) La Ilaha (negation-nafy) This corresponds to the world (as Manifestation) inasmuch as it is illusory in relation to Ultimate Reality.

2) In-la Allah (affirmation-ithbat) This corresponds to Ultimate Reality which, in relation to the world (as Manifestation), is the sole reality.  

But pure illusion cannot exist on its own, and this is why there is "ilah', (Reality) within the first part of the shahada)

And the world cannot be unless it is prefigured in some way within Ultimate Reality.  This is why you have In-la within the second part of the shahada.  The word Allah would be Ultimate Reality itself.   

I hope this helps

FuLaN BIN FuLaN

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Advanced Member
On 1/9/2021 at 3:15 PM, 313_Waiter said:

:salam:

I know the shorter meanings:

SubhanAllah - Glory be to God

Alhamdulillah - Praise be to God

Lailaha illa Allah - There is no god (ilah) but God (Allah)

Allahu Akbar - God is greater 

 

However, I am looking for the deeper, in-depth meanings. Please link any lectures, articles, hadiths. 

For example, regarding Allahu Akbar we have the following hadith:

image.png.9e1959591178ead289e700df92d1d5f1.png

Barakallahu Feek.

For Subhanallah, from al Mizan: Commentary on Al Isra verse 1

Quote

Subḥān is the verbal noun of tasbīḥ, which means to affirm the transcendence of something (tanzīh). It is used annexed to a noun (muḍāfan) as an absolute object (maf ʿūl muṭlaq) that takes the place of a verb. The implied meaning of subḥān Allāh is: subḥān Allāh is sabbaḥ tu Allāha tasbīḥan,meaning “I declare God’s freedom from everything inappropriate to His Holiness.” This phrase is oſten used as an exclamation. However the context of these verses only fits glorification, because that is the theme of the discourse, even though some exegetes have insisted that it is exclamatory.

For Alhumdulillah,

Quote

Know that the noble saying [kalimah]: "All praise is for Allah", according to what had already been said, is of the all-inclusive sayings [kalimat], and, if with its delicacies and truths one praises Allah, he will be performing the most that is in the capacity of a human being to perform. Hence the noble hadiths refer to it. It is narrated that Imam al-Baqir (عليه السلام) once came out of a house and found that his mount had gone. He said: "If I find the mount, I will praise Allah as praising deserves. "When his mount was found, he mounted, tidied his clothes and said: All praise is for Allah."[423] The Messenger of Allah (SA) is quoted to have said: "`There is no god but Allah' is half of a scale, and `All praise is for Allah' fills the other half of the scale."[424] This is because of what we have said that "All praise is for Allah" includes monotheism, too. The Messenger of Allah (SA) is also quoted to have said: "The servant's saying: `All praise is for Allah' is heavier, in His scales, than seven heavens and seven earths."[425] He (SA) is also quoted to have said: "If Allah gave to one of His servants the entire world, and then that servant said: `All praise is for Allah', that saying would be better than what he had been given." [426]Further quotation from him (SA) says: "Nothing is more loved by Allah than one's saying: `All praise is for Allah', as Allah Himself has so praised Himself. , [427] There are many similar hadiths.

[423]. Usulul Kafi, vol. 3, p. 152, "Book of Faith and Disbelief', ch. on
"Thanking", hadith No. 18.
[424]. Biharul Anwar, vol. 90, p. 210, quoted from al-Amaliby at-Tusi,
vol. 1, p. 18.
[425]. Mustadrakul Wasa'il, printed by Alul Bayt Establishment, vol. 5,
p. 314.
[426]. Makarimul Akhlaq, p. 307, section 10, ch. 3 on praising Allah
(with a slight difference)

Above is from Adabus Salaat by Imam Al Khomeini in the chapter of a short commentary of Surah Al Hamd. 

Will provide more info on other phrases when I get time.

Edited by Zainuu
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Veteran Member

The Sufi meaning of La ilaha illa Allah according to William C. Chittick in The Study Qur'an:

Quote

“One might say that the goal of Sufi theoretical teachings is to provide a cosmic anthropology combined with cosmology, that is, an exposition of human nature with respect to God’s purpose in creating the universe. Right understanding of human nature must begin at the beginning, which is God, the assertion of whose unity, tawḥīd, is the first principle of Islamic faith. Tawḥīd is expressed most succinctly by the first part of the shahādah, “(There is) no god but God,” a formula that provides the core of Islamic thought. Its two halves—typically called the negation (nafy) and the affirmation (ithbāt)—negate Divine Qualities from everything other than God and ascribe all Reality and all Qualities to Him alone.

 

The dialectic established by this negation and affirmation reverberates throughout the writings of the Sufis and provides the basic standpoint for understanding the Quran’s message, which is encapsulated by God’s “Most Beautiful Names” (al-asmāʾ al-ḥusnā). Thus, for example, if God is the Creator (al-Khāliq), this means that there is no creator but God. In other words, this Name negates ontological creativity from creatures and affirms that it belongs to God alone. The Quran puts it rhetorically: Is there a creator other than God? (35:3). If God is the Strong (al-Qawī), then there is no strength save in God (18:39). If He is the Rich (al-Ghanī), then, O mankind! You are needful of God; and He is the Self-Sufficient, the Praised (35:15). If He is the Sovereign (al-Malik), then unto God belongs sovereignty over the heavens and the earth (3:189) and He has no partner in sovereignty (17:111)…

 

Everything in the universe, the soul, and the Quran is a sign/verse. All signs need to be deciphered through both negation, “no god,” and affirmation, “but God.” With regard to negation, signs have no reality compared to God’s infinite Reality; as for affirmation, each sign points to the Real, for all qualities derive their sustenance from His Qualities. Inasmuch as all things denote God’s Names and Attributes, everything in the entire universe is a tajallī, a “theophany,” a Divine “Self-Disclosure” (tajalli). This word is taken from a verse in which Moses asks God to show Himself. God replies that Moses will not be able to see Him. And when his Lord manifested Himself (tajallā) to the mountain, He made it crumble to dust, and Moses fell down in a swoon (7:143). The blinding light of theophany negates the mountain and its viewer, just as every sign, seen with the eye of discernment, negates the unreal and affirms that there is nothing real but the Real. 

 

Each of the cosmic signs/verses is a specific thing, event, word, or sentence, but each also points to something else beyond itself…”

Thoughts Br. @Nightclaw?

In the words of Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Rūmī:

Quote

Love is that flame which, when it blazes up,

burns away everything except the Subsistent Beloved.

It drives home the sword of “no god” in order to slay other than God

Look closely—after “no god” what remains?

There remains “but God,” the rest has gone.

Bravo, O great, idol-burning Love!

 

Edited by 313_Waiter
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Veteran Member

Haven't listened yet but intend on listening inshaAllah. Please continue sharing hadiths and definitions from the 'Ulema regarding these blessed verses, Barakallahu Fik wa salamu alaykum wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh.

Edited by 313_Waiter
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Veteran Member
On 1/15/2021 at 8:56 PM, Guest FuLaN said:

la (no) ilaha (God), in-la (if not), Allah (God). 

Salaam FuLaN.

I never saw the shahādah translated in this way. I always understood illa to mean but, except, only and not “if not”. 

Also, if we are to say this then we will have to say that the Ghulat who were worshipping Hazrat Ali (عليه السلام) were worshipping Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) (Nauzubillah) but at the same they didn’t realise how he (عليه السلام) was only part of this wave of Existence that is Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى). Thus, the harsh punishment that the blessed Imam (عليه السلام) executed on such people, after they refused to repent, would not make as much sense (this is believed by many of scholars). On the other hand the Qur’anic criticism of idolatry and other types of shirk does not really make sense if this is true.

And Allah knows best.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
  • 1 month later...
  • Advanced Member
On 2/20/2021 at 11:15 AM, 313_Waiter said:

I just ordered the Naqshbandi Awrad of Mawlana Shaykh Muhammad Nazim Adil al-Haqqani. Not that I follow the Naqshbandi, but I am interested in applying some of the daily and weekly adhkar to see if it helps me attain yaqeen, taqwa and proximity to Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...