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In the Name of God بسم الله

What Does Islam Say about Racism?

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The Holy Quran mentions about the Racism: O mankind! Indeed, We created you from a male and a female and made you nations and tribes that you may identify yourselves with one another. Indeed, the noblest of you in the sight of Allah is the most God wary among you. Indeed, Allah is all-knowing, all-aware (49:13).


"The issue of equality between all human beings, opposition to any type of racial, ancestral and class discrimination, fairness between all the children of Adam in relation to human rights and that no person is better than another due to his skin color, language, lineage or race - is one of the most important societal issues in the Qur’an which has been mentioned in various verses of this Heavenly Book. The Qur’an has denounced all sorts of superiority - whether it be of race, language, or skin color." 


Likewise, Prophet Muhammad ((صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم) & HP) says: Surely all of mankind – from the time of Adam until our time – are like the teeth of a comb (all equal to one another) and there is no greatness for an `Arab over a non-`Arab and no greatness for a red-skinned person over a black-skinned person, except due to one’s consciousness of Allah (taqwa).”


There are numerous verses in the Holy Quran and the teachings of the Holy Prophet ((صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم) & HP) that invite human beings towards brotherhood and equality. Throughout his life, the Holy Prophet ((صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم) & HP) taught people that all humans are one and the only difference that exists is in their God-wariness as mentioned in verse 13 of Surah Hujarat. We learn from the Holy Prophet ((صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم) & HP) and the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) that Islam has established equality for the entire human race and struck at the very root of all distinctions based on color, race, language or nationality. According to Islam, Allah has given man this right of equality as a birthright. Thus, no man should be discriminated against on the basis of the color of his skin, his place of birth, his race or the nation in which he was born. 

 

Racism


Apart from conveying the pure teachings of Islam, the Holy Prophet ((صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم) &HP) was also able to rouse hope in the hearts of the poor and the downtrodden section of his society. In many instances within his practical life, he was successful in eliminating bigotry and racism that was surrounding him. In order for him to reach his aim of equality between all human beings, he married the daughter of his uncle to a slave named Zaid. In addition, he gave Bilal, who was both a non-`Arab and an African slave (at one point in his life), the important religious post of being the Muaddhin, the one who calls to prayer. He also convinced Ziyad ibn Labid who was one of the richest and noblest men from amongst the Ansar to marry his daughter to an African slave named Jubair. This marriage between a nobleman's daughter and a slave, was the beginning of many such marriages that broke mental and social barriers among the followers of Islam. Islam is a practical example of how human beings and societies can fight racial discrimination and create a society based on unity and brotherhood.


Martyr Malcolm X Talks about Racism in Hajj


The annual ritual of Hajj is an outstanding display of beauty and splendor among the followers of Islam and it is this very beauty of Islam that inspired (Martyr) Malcolm X to write the following letter after he made his first Hajj:


"Never have I witnessed such sincere hospitality and overwhelming spirit of true brotherhood as is practiced by people of all colors and races here in this ancient Holy Land, the home of Abraham, Muhammad and all the other prophets of the Holy Scriptures. For the past week, I have been utterly speechless and spellbound by the graciousness I see displayed all around me by people of all colors.....There were tens of thousands of pilgrims, from all over the world. They were of all colors, from blue-eyed blondes to black-skinned Africans. But we were all participating in the same ritual, displaying a spirit of unity and brotherhood that my experiences in America had led me to believe never could exist between the white and the non-white. You may be shocked by these words coming from me. But on this pilgrimage, what I have seen, and experienced, has forced me to rearrange much of my thought-patterns previously held, and to toss aside some of my previous conclusions. This was not too difficult for me. Despite my firm convictions, I have been always a man who tries to face facts, and to accept the reality of life as new experience and new knowledge unfolds it. I have always kept an open mind, which is necessary to the flexibility that must go hand in hand with every form of intelligent search for truth.
During the past eleven days here in the Muslim world, I have eaten from the same plate, drunk from the same glass and slept in the same bed (or on the same rug)-while praying to the same Allah with fellow Muslims, whose eyes were the bluest of the blue, whose hair was the blondest of blond, and whose skin was the whitest of white. And in the words and in the actions and in the deeds of the ‘white' Muslims, I felt the same sincerity that I felt among the black African Muslims of Nigeria, Sudan and Ghana.
We are truly all the same-brothers.
All praise is due to Allah, the Lord of the worlds."

stop-5266892_1280.jpg
 

Conclusion:


The Holy Quran tells us:
"Certainly, We have honored the Children of Adam, and carried them over land and sea, and provided them with all the good things, and preferred them with a complete preference over many of those We have created." (17:70)


The Holy Quran teaches us that Islam lays down some rights for man as a human being. Every man whether he belongs to one country or the other, whether he is a believer or a non-believer, whether he lives in forest or desert, whatever be the case, he has some basic human rights simply because he is a human being, which should be recognized by every human being.


Today, the world is struggling to come to terms with equality in true sense. Racial discrimination continues to be a challenge, even for the most developed nations. However, Islam has shown the way to fight racial discrimination and create a society based on amity, love and unity. InshaAllah, the world will very soon realize that the only solution to racism lies in following Islam.


References:
1. Islamic Moral System: Commentary of Surah Al-Hujurat Ayt. Jafar Subhani
2. Malcolm X's letter http://islam.uga.edu/malcomx.html

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On 10/24/2020 at 4:24 AM, Salamislam. said:

The Holy Quran mentions about the Racism: O mankind! Indeed, We created you from a male and a female and made you nations and tribes that you may identify yourselves with one another. Indeed, the noblest of you in the sight of Allah is the most God wary among you. Indeed, Allah is all-knowing, all-aware (49:13).


"The issue of equality between all human beings, opposition to any type of racial, ancestral and class discrimination, fairness between all the children of Adam in relation to human rights and that no person is better than another due to his skin color, language, lineage or race - is one of the most important societal issues in the Qur’an which has been mentioned in various verses of this Heavenly Book. The Qur’an has denounced all sorts of superiority - whether it be of race, language, or skin color." 


Likewise, Prophet Muhammad ((صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم) & HP) says: Surely all of mankind – from the time of Adam until our time – are like the teeth of a comb (all equal to one another) and there is no greatness for an `Arab over a non-`Arab and no greatness for a red-skinned person over a black-skinned person, except due to one’s consciousness of Allah (taqwa).”


There are numerous verses in the Holy Quran and the teachings of the Holy Prophet ((صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم) & HP) that invite human beings towards brotherhood and equality. Throughout his life, the Holy Prophet ((صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم) & HP) taught people that all humans are one and the only difference that exists is in their God-wariness as mentioned in verse 13 of Surah Hujarat. We learn from the Holy Prophet ((صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم) & HP) and the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) that Islam has established equality for the entire human race and struck at the very root of all distinctions based on color, race, language or nationality. According to Islam, Allah has given man this right of equality as a birthright. Thus, no man should be discriminated against on the basis of the color of his skin, his place of birth, his race or the nation in which he was born. 

 

Racism


Apart from conveying the pure teachings of Islam, the Holy Prophet ((صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم) &HP) was also able to rouse hope in the hearts of the poor and the downtrodden section of his society. In many instances within his practical life, he was successful in eliminating bigotry and racism that was surrounding him. In order for him to reach his aim of equality between all human beings, he married the daughter of his uncle to a slave named Zaid. In addition, he gave Bilal, who was both a non-`Arab and an African slave (at one point in his life), the important religious post of being the Muaddhin, the one who calls to prayer. He also convinced Ziyad ibn Labid who was one of the richest and noblest men from amongst the Ansar to marry his daughter to an African slave named Jubair. This marriage between a nobleman's daughter and a slave, was the beginning of many such marriages that broke mental and social barriers among the followers of Islam. Islam is a practical example of how human beings and societies can fight racial discrimination and create a society based on unity and brotherhood.


Martyr Malcolm X Talks about Racism in Hajj


The annual ritual of Hajj is an outstanding display of beauty and splendor among the followers of Islam and it is this very beauty of Islam that inspired (Martyr) Malcolm X to write the following letter after he made his first Hajj:


"Never have I witnessed such sincere hospitality and overwhelming spirit of true brotherhood as is practiced by people of all colors and races here in this ancient Holy Land, the home of Abraham, Muhammad and all the other prophets of the Holy Scriptures. For the past week, I have been utterly speechless and spellbound by the graciousness I see displayed all around me by people of all colors.....There were tens of thousands of pilgrims, from all over the world. They were of all colors, from blue-eyed blondes to black-skinned Africans. But we were all participating in the same ritual, displaying a spirit of unity and brotherhood that my experiences in America had led me to believe never could exist between the white and the non-white. You may be shocked by these words coming from me. But on this pilgrimage, what I have seen, and experienced, has forced me to rearrange much of my thought-patterns previously held, and to toss aside some of my previous conclusions. This was not too difficult for me. Despite my firm convictions, I have been always a man who tries to face facts, and to accept the reality of life as new experience and new knowledge unfolds it. I have always kept an open mind, which is necessary to the flexibility that must go hand in hand with every form of intelligent search for truth.
During the past eleven days here in the Muslim world, I have eaten from the same plate, drunk from the same glass and slept in the same bed (or on the same rug)-while praying to the same Allah with fellow Muslims, whose eyes were the bluest of the blue, whose hair was the blondest of blond, and whose skin was the whitest of white. And in the words and in the actions and in the deeds of the ‘white' Muslims, I felt the same sincerity that I felt among the black African Muslims of Nigeria, Sudan and Ghana.
We are truly all the same-brothers.
All praise is due to Allah, the Lord of the worlds."

stop-5266892_1280.jpg
 

Conclusion:


The Holy Quran tells us:
"Certainly, We have honored the Children of Adam, and carried them over land and sea, and provided them with all the good things, and preferred them with a complete preference over many of those We have created." (17:70)


The Holy Quran teaches us that Islam lays down some rights for man as a human being. Every man whether he belongs to one country or the other, whether he is a believer or a non-believer, whether he lives in forest or desert, whatever be the case, he has some basic human rights simply because he is a human being, which should be recognized by every human being.


Today, the world is struggling to come to terms with equality in true sense. Racial discrimination continues to be a challenge, even for the most developed nations. However, Islam has shown the way to fight racial discrimination and create a society based on amity, love and unity. InshaAllah, the world will very soon realize that the only solution to racism lies in following Islam.


References:
1. Islamic Moral System: Commentary of Surah Al-Hujurat Ayt. Jafar Subhani
2. Malcolm X's letter http://islam.uga.edu/malcomx.html

Islam does not support racism whereas Christianity does.

take a good look at this:

Pin on IDF is a terrorist Beat, rape, torture and murder children everyday

 

 

Quran says to be righteous towards those who worship another god

https://biblehub.com/exodus/22-20.htm

Islam is a respectful religion towards all religions

Those who took part in the 2001 incident are not Muslims. Islam literally means:

to surrender PEACEFULLY

 wasalam

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On 10/24/2020 at 1:18 PM, hasanhh said:

Bro, l do not think you needed to bring Malcolm X into this.

His fall-back position was violence even when not attacked.

Salam anyway his violent attitude highly decreased after his Hajj because before Hajj , He was just seeing Islam & NOI as best tool for fighting with white devils due his warior soul but also he wasn't completely blinded by his hatred from white but in other hand  his seeker soul   was seeking for perfection because of his idealistic soul so his mindset changed greatly after performing Hajj & he tried to find a moderate way for reaching to his goal but unfortunately he martyred shortly after performing Hajj but he became a source of inspiration for a group of "African American " like him for converting to Islam even Shia Islam 

Unending Struggle: The African American Shias | Promo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v7aef0biVq4

Unending Struggle: The African American Shias

 

https://brill.com/view/journals/soi/6/1/article-p29_29.xml

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Quote

“Today when I look at myself in the mirror, I see a black Muslim woman,” Ali said at an event for black and Shia Muslims on Monday. “But five years ago, I would have seen just a Muslim woman.”

One of the main issues black Muslims face is being questioned based on their appearance, Ali said at the event. Ali said once she started studying in Singapore and Abu Dhabi, she began to reevaluate her identity.

“I became the representative of Islam [in Singapore] because I wore a hijab,” Ali said. “I was afraid of coming here. I didn’t want to apply to uni in the USA because Trump was getting elected.”

https://nyunews.com/news/2019/11/27/msa-event-marginalized-students/

Shi‘i Islam in the African American Community

Quote

 the ethnic divisions within the Shi‘i community and the fact that Shi‘ism is highly reliant on the foreign-based leadership means that the Shi‘i community has not been concerned with reaching out to potential converts. This chapter also argues that by their vehement attacks on the Shi‘is, the Wahhabis have aroused the curiosity of many African American converts who may have not heard of Shi‘ism.

https://www.oxfordhandbooks.com/view/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199929269.001.0001/oxfordhb-9780199929269-e-002

 

Are Black Muslims Sunni or Shiite?

Many say, “None of the above.’

Quote

Many of those black Muslims who do happen to identify themselves as Shiite were inspired by the 1979 Iranian revolution; younger American Shiites might have been exposed to the sect of Islam during study-abroad programs.

https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2008/06/do-black-muslims-in-america-identify-as-sunni-or-shiite.html

Quote

“One Out of 5 Black People Have Someone In Their Family Who Is a Muslim” / Interview With Amir Hakeem From Shia Community of US

 My first contact with Islam was when I was confined at a youth detention. One of the youth there let me read the biography of Malcom X which intrigued me. In 1993, I was convicted and given a life term in prison. This is where I started getting into studying Islam. I encountered the Nation of Islam and embraced their Black Nationalist ideology but couldn’t accept the concept of man being “Allah” (Subhanallah). I realized this had no place within my heart then I began reading orthodox Islam. Before I can get indoctrinated with the mainstream Sunni narrative I met a Shia [brother] who gave me the book then I was guided. From that day I became a lover of Ahl al-Bayt ((عليه السلام)).

https://india.shafaqna.com/EN/one-out-of-5-black-people-have-someone-in-their-family-who-is-a-muslim-interview-with-amir-hakeem-from-shia-community-of-us/

Black American Muslims reflect on hajj journey

Quote

‘Purge’ negativity
At 66, Habeebah Muhammad Abdul-Wali has lived through many phases of the civil rights struggle.

When Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in 1968, she marched in protests. She was in the Black Power movement. And in 1972, she converted and joined the Nation of Islam, though now she’s a mainstream Sunni.

She says “history is repeating itself” with the current protests in the U.S. But, for her, there’s a difference: Back then, she saw greater seriousness, greater sincerity.

https://en.shafaqna.com/20653/black-american-muslims-reflect-on-hajj-journey/

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African American Twelver Shia Community of New York

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Abstract/Excerpt
Few studies analyze minorities among the African American Muslims in the United States. The absence of ethnographic research shows that the current scholarship neglects the minority status of African American Twelver Shias. Based on fieldwork observations from March to December 2015 and several informal interviews, I try to understand how the African American Shia community of New York was formed and how it negotiated its identity when encountered with African American non-Shia Muslims and with Twelver Muslims of other ethnic backgrounds. I try to revisit the diasporic/immigrant religious culture that some Twelver Shias like to practice. This culture seems to have no resonance for the African American Twelver Muslims. Because some African American Twelvers joined Shia Islam after the end of the classic period of the Nation of Islam, it is argued that highlighting cultural practices by the immigrant community might force some African American Twelvers back to their practices of origin.

https://brill.com/view/journals/soi/6/1/article-p29_29.xml

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Profile: Sheikh Mujahid Abdul-Karim

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Last year April 26th marked the 25th anniversary of the Watts Peace Treaty between the 220px-imam_mujahid_abdul-karim1Bloods and Crips. Many know of this significant event or have a general idea of the bloodshed and conflict that filled the streets of California that led up to this event. What may not be so well known is the history of this peace treaty.  First, is the fact that such a historical event was facilitated by a Sheikh is significant. Even more significant is the fact that this Sheikh is an African American (Sheikh Mujahid Abdul-Karim) and Shiite and this “ceasefire” treaty was negotiated and signed in a Shiite mosque; Masjid Al-Rasul [Watts, Los Angeles, California].   Sheikh Abdul-Karim helped bring together Bloods and Crips from the Imperial Courts, Nickerson Gardens and Jordan Downs housing projects to discuss a truce that they verbally agreed to on April 26, three days before the not-guilty verdicts in the Rodney G. King beating and the riots that followed.

Sheikh Abdul-Karim (formerly Benjamin Farmer) is a convert to Islam and religious leader of Masjid Al-Rasul. 

https://sapelosquare.com/2016/02/22/profile-sheikh-mujahid-abdul-karim/

Edited by Hameedeh
Fixed formatting.
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Trump Jewish advisor: Blacks in US lack motivation to succeed

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"Jared Kushner speaks as if Black people are lazy complainers who don't want to be successful," said civil rights attorney Benjamin Crump, who represented Floyd's family.
Kushner's argument that Black Americans lack motivation to succeed drew criticism that he is blind to his own privilege and that his own success is attributable more to his family's wealth than his own efforts.

"Jared Kushner is the face of white privilege and nepotism. He doesn't want to change our racist, broken system because he benefits from it. He’s the last person that should be lecturing the Black community on the value of 'hard work,'" said Democratic Congresswoman Barbara Lee.

 

https://en.abna24.com/news//trump-jewish-advisor-blacks-in-us-lack-motivation-to-succeed_1081503.html

 

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