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In the Name of God بسم الله

Celebrating Christmas?

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Christmas is celebrating the birth of a prophet so I don't see anything wrong with it as long as I'm not worshiping Jesus ((صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم)). What are your opinions about it.

Edited by musa shakr
remove the word holy
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It is totally haram to celebrate Christmas for a number of reasons. Firstly, it is a non-Muslim festival and it hasn’t been legislated in our Shari’ah. Participating in non-Muslim religious festivals

So Hz. Isa wasn't actually born on Dec 25th. I wish my Christian friends Merry Christmas. Sometimes there is a gift exchange at work and I participate in that too. Thats about it. Definitely

David - you are always welcome just like you are welcome on ShiaChat. BTW, this is not a Shiah vs Sunni issue. I have met shiahs who think like Cherry as well. With the adage that "Man is ei

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l do not "celebrate, but l do show social respect for the people who do celebrate it. Especially when l attend a sober party.

l do object in using the word "holy". l started a search for its biblical usage (500+ times just in Young's Literal translation) and found such a plethora of usage in Exodus as to devoid the word of any real meaning that l stopped reading through the list for the entire bible.

'Holy men', 'holy garments', 'holy of holies', 'holy groud', -just from short term memory- you get the observation.

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23 hours ago, musa shakr said:

Christmas is celebrating the birth of a prophet so I don't see anything wrong with it as long as I'm not worshiping Jesus ((صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم)). What are your opinions about it.

So Hz. Isa wasn't actually born on Dec 25th.

I wish my Christian friends Merry Christmas. Sometimes there is a gift exchange at work and I participate in that too.

Thats about it. Definitely no pagan christmas tree in my house though. 

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1 hour ago, ShiaMan14 said:

So Hz. Isa wasn't actually born on Dec 25th.

I wish my Christian friends Merry Christmas. Sometimes there is a gift exchange at work and I participate in that too.

Thats about it. Definitely no pagan christmas tree in my house though. 

I just exchange gifts with my Christian family.

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On 9/21/2020 at 9:56 PM, musa shakr said:

Christmas is celebrating the birth of a prophet so I don't see anything wrong with it as long as I'm not worshiping Jesus ((صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم)). What are your opinions about it.

It is totally haram to celebrate Christmas for a number of reasons. Firstly, it is a non-Muslim festival and it hasn’t been legislated in our Shari’ah. Participating in non-Muslim religious festivals is a big no-no in our Religion and Shari’ah. That includes Easter, Divali, Halloween, Valentine’s Day, St. Patrick’s Day, Holi, Nowruz, Vaisaki and so forth.

Secondly, Christmas itself (December 25) is based on the pagan festival of the winter solstice. It is based on sun-worship (Christianity transformed it into son-worship).

Thirdly, celebrating Christmas is to resemble the millat of Kufr, which we are commanded to disassociate from.

Fourthly, Christmas isn’t the birthday of Jesus of Nazareth, everyone knows this.

Fifthly, there are many haram activities associated with Christmas, like singing songs that are Christian, drinking, mixing with women, etc.

Sixthly, it is contrary to the honor of Islam. Muslims are required to honor our own Religion and never honor another religion.

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2 minutes ago, Cherub786 said:

It is totally haram to celebrate Christmas for a number of reasons. Firstly, it is a non-Muslim festival and it hasn’t been legislated in our Shari’ah. Participating in non-Muslim religious festivals is a big no-no in our Religion and Shari’ah. That includes Easter, Divali, Halloween, Valentine’s Day, St. Patrick’s Day, Holi, Nowruz, Vaisaki and so forth.

Secondly, Christmas itself (December 25) is based on the pagan festival of the winter solstice. It is based on sun-worship (Christianity transformed it into son-worship).

Thirdly, celebrating Christmas is to resemble the millat of Kufr, which we are commanded to disassociate from.

Fourthly, Christmas isn’t the birthday of Jesus of Nazareth, everyone knows this.

Fifthly, there are many haram activities associated with Christmas, like singing songs that are Christian, drinking, mixing with women, etc.

Sixthly, it is contrary to the honor of Islam. Muslims are required to honor our own Religion and never honor another religion.

You actually just changed my mind about it, I guess no more Christmas for me.

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1 hour ago, ShiaMan14 said:

I wish my Christian friends Merry Christmas. Sometimes there is a gift exchange at work and I participate in that too.

You’re still participating in a pagan festival. Congradulating people on something that opposes Islam is contrary to the Shari’ah. Exchanging gifts is just as bad.

You have the option to tell your employer that as a Muslim you cannot participate at all in un-Islamic and Christian activities.

Let me ask you, just as it is haram to participate in other aspects of another religion, why has it become normalized to participate in the festivals of false religions? This is a sort of Westernization of Muslims that while they don’t actually go inside a church and start praying to Jesus, they nevertheless feel there is nothing wrong with celebrating a Christian festival.

Festivals that are inherently religious – participating in them is a form of worship.

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1 minute ago, musa shakr said:

You actually just changed my mind about it, I guess no more Christmas for me.

Jazakum Allah al-Khaira!

May Allah reward you abundantly for having recognized the Truth and made a decision to follow it.

I hope and pray you stick to your decision firmly and don’t backslide due to any social pressure. Pray that Allah gives you istiqamah – steadfastness and consistency.

You will be blessed in this decision, I’m sure of it. For the sake of Allah you are sacrificing something that is apparently important to your family and has a long tradition. But Allah will not allow your sacrifice to go in vain.

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9 hours ago, musa shakr said:

You actually just changed my mind about it, I guess no more Christmas for me.

Are you serious? 
 

He just made haram what is halal. Please think for yourself brother. A very cozy and now also becoming secular tradition that brings your family together to have dinner and celebrate. How can this be haram? What about halloween or thanksgiving? Also haram? No! And so what if it was a Christian holiday? It is not preserved only for christians. In northern europe it’s referred to as Winter party. 

I celebrate with a tree and duck and gifts. It’s super cozy and fun and will not let anyone make me feel guilty about it.

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Guest Gamila
9 hours ago, Cherub786 said:

You’re still participating in a pagan festival. Congradulating people on something that opposes Islam is contrary to the Shari’ah. Exchanging gifts is just as bad.

You have the option to tell your employer that as a Muslim you cannot participate at all in un-Islamic and Christian activities.

Let me ask you, just as it is haram to participate in other aspects of another religion, why has it become normalized to participate in the festivals of false religions? This is a sort of Westernization of Muslims that while they don’t actually go inside a church and start praying to Jesus, they nevertheless feel there is nothing wrong with celebrating a Christian festival.

Festivals that are inherently religious – participating in them is a form of worship.

Very sad that you just made it haram. You’re arguments are weak and has no Quranic fundament. Well, it’s like the stricter you are the more piety you have. So sad.
 

For me I love this holiday as much as I love birthdays, graduation parties, valentines day and ofc eid! I celebrate because life is beautiful and should be cherished. Allah gave us the option to be happy and halal at the same time. Don’t make it haram to make yourself feel good.

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10 hours ago, Cherub786 said:

You’re still participating in a pagan festival. Congradulating people on something that opposes Islam is contrary to the Shari’ah. Exchanging gifts is just as bad.

You have the option to tell your employer that as a Muslim you cannot participate at all in un-Islamic and Christian activities.

Let me ask you, just as it is haram to participate in other aspects of another religion, why has it become normalized to participate in the festivals of false religions? This is a sort of Westernization of Muslims that while they don’t actually go inside a church and start praying to Jesus, they nevertheless feel there is nothing wrong with celebrating a Christian festival.

Festivals that are inherently religious – participating in them is a form of worship.

According to sunni folklore, it is perfectly acceptable to partake in pagan and ahle-kitab festivals - Christmas happens to be both.

Narrated Aisha:
During the Pre-lslamic Period of ignorance the Quraish used to observe fasting on the day of 'Ashura', and the Prophet (ﷺ) himself used to observe fasting on it too. But when he came to Medina, he fasted on that day and ordered the Muslims to fast on it. When (the order of compulsory fasting in ) Ramadan was revealed, fasting in Ramadan became an obligation, and fasting on 'Ashura' was given up, and who ever wished to fast (on it) did so, and whoever did not wish to fast on it, did not fast.
Sahih Bukhari: Book 65, Hadith 31

It was narrated from ‘Abdullah bin ‘Umar that the Day of ‘Ashura’ was mentioned in the presence of the Messenger of Allah (ﷺ). The Messenger of Allah (ﷺ) said:
“That was a day when the people of the Ignorance used to fast. So whoever among you wants to fast may do so, and whoever does not want to may leave it.”
Sunan Ibn Majah: Book 7, Hadith 1809

Narrated Abu Musa:
The day of 'Ashura' was considered as `Id day by the Jews. So the Prophet (ﷺ) ordered, "I recommend you (Muslims) to fast on this day."
Sahih Bukhari: Book 30, Hadith 110

Narrated Ibn `Abbas:
When the Prophet (ﷺ) arrived at Medina, the Jews were observing the fast on 'Ashura' (10th of Muharram) and they said, "This is the day when Moses became victorious over Pharaoh," On that, the Prophet (ﷺ) said to his companions, "You (Muslims) have more right to celebrate Moses' victory than they have, so observe the fast on this day."
Sahih Bukhari: Book 65, Hadith 202

 

If the Prohet (صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم) can fast maintaining pagan (kuffar of Mecca) and Jewish tradition, why can't I exchange gifts on Christmas? I am covered from pagan and ahle-kitab sides. Heck, we should all fast on Christmas.

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Guest Gamila
1 minute ago, ShiaMan14 said:

According to sunni folklore, it is perfectly acceptable to partake in pagan and ahle-kitab festivals - Christmas happens to be both.

Narrated Aisha:
During the Pre-lslamic Period of ignorance the Quraish used to observe fasting on the day of 'Ashura', and the Prophet (ﷺ) himself used to observe fasting on it too. But when he came to Medina, he fasted on that day and ordered the Muslims to fast on it. When (the order of compulsory fasting in ) Ramadan was revealed, fasting in Ramadan became an obligation, and fasting on 'Ashura' was given up, and who ever wished to fast (on it) did so, and whoever did not wish to fast on it, did not fast.
Sahih Bukhari: Book 65, Hadith 31

It was narrated from ‘Abdullah bin ‘Umar that the Day of ‘Ashura’ was mentioned in the presence of the Messenger of Allah (ﷺ). The Messenger of Allah (ﷺ) said:
“That was a day when the people of the Ignorance used to fast. So whoever among you wants to fast may do so, and whoever does not want to may leave it.”
Sunan Ibn Majah: Book 7, Hadith 1809

Narrated Abu Musa:
The day of 'Ashura' was considered as `Id day by the Jews. So the Prophet (ﷺ) ordered, "I recommend you (Muslims) to fast on this day."
Sahih Bukhari: Book 30, Hadith 110

Narrated Ibn `Abbas:
When the Prophet (ﷺ) arrived at Medina, the Jews were observing the fast on 'Ashura' (10th of Muharram) and they said, "This is the day when Moses became victorious over Pharaoh," On that, the Prophet (ﷺ) said to his companions, "You (Muslims) have more right to celebrate Moses' victory than they have, so observe the fast on this day."
Sahih Bukhari: Book 65, Hadith 202

 

If the Prohet (صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم) can fast maintaining pagan (kuffar of Mecca) and Jewish tradition, why can't I exchange gifts on Christmas? I am covered from pagan and ahle-kitab sides. Heck, we should all fast on Christmas.

Thank you! Fully agree!

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Yes, Christmas has pagan connections and we should disassociate from all the pagan elements. But what about just sending salām to Isa bin Maryam ((عليه السلام)) and wishing the Christians a merry Christmas whilst discussing the commonalities within our religions?

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1 hour ago, ShiaMan14 said:

According to sunni folklore, it is perfectly acceptable to partake in pagan and ahle-kitab festivals - Christmas happens to be both.

Narrated Aisha:
During the Pre-lslamic Period of ignorance the Quraish used to observe fasting on the day of 'Ashura', and the Prophet (ﷺ) himself used to observe fasting on it too. But when he came to Medina, he fasted on that day and ordered the Muslims to fast on it. When (the order of compulsory fasting in ) Ramadan was revealed, fasting in Ramadan became an obligation, and fasting on 'Ashura' was given up, and who ever wished to fast (on it) did so, and whoever did not wish to fast on it, did not fast.
Sahih Bukhari: Book 65, Hadith 31

It was narrated from ‘Abdullah bin ‘Umar that the Day of ‘Ashura’ was mentioned in the presence of the Messenger of Allah (ﷺ). The Messenger of Allah (ﷺ) said:
“That was a day when the people of the Ignorance used to fast. So whoever among you wants to fast may do so, and whoever does not want to may leave it.”
Sunan Ibn Majah: Book 7, Hadith 1809

Narrated Abu Musa:
The day of 'Ashura' was considered as `Id day by the Jews. So the Prophet (ﷺ) ordered, "I recommend you (Muslims) to fast on this day."
Sahih Bukhari: Book 30, Hadith 110

Narrated Ibn `Abbas:
When the Prophet (ﷺ) arrived at Medina, the Jews were observing the fast on 'Ashura' (10th of Muharram) and they said, "This is the day when Moses became victorious over Pharaoh," On that, the Prophet (ﷺ) said to his companions, "You (Muslims) have more right to celebrate Moses' victory than they have, so observe the fast on this day."
Sahih Bukhari: Book 65, Hadith 202

 

If the Prohet (صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم) can fast maintaining pagan (kuffar of Mecca) and Jewish tradition, why can't I exchange gifts on Christmas? I am covered from pagan and ahle-kitab sides. Heck, we should all fast on Christmas.

I didn't know that. Thanks.

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2 hours ago, ShiaMan14 said:

If the Prohet (صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم) can fast maintaining pagan (kuffar of Mecca) and Jewish tradition, why can't I exchange gifts on Christmas? I am covered from pagan and ahle-kitab sides. Heck, we should all fast on Christmas.

The significance of Ashura fasting is legislated and confirmed in our Religion, as per the Ahadith you quoted. That the pagan Arabs fasted on it doesn’t mean it is inherently pagan or of pagan origin. On the contrary, the pagan Arabs used to venerate the Ka’ba, make Tawaf, perform Hajj rites, drink from Zamzam, and so forth. Does that mean these rites are inherently pagan or of pagan origin?

Secondly, the pagan Arabs actually fasted on Ashura in imitation of the Jews. Yom Kippur is not a pagan festival, it is prescribed and legislated in the Torah itself. Comparing it to Christmas is ludicrous.

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3 hours ago, Guest Gamila said:

Very sad that you just made it haram. You’re arguments are weak and has no Quranic fundament. Well, it’s like the stricter you are the more piety you have. So sad.
For me I love this holiday as much as I love birthdays, graduation parties, valentines day and ofc eid! I celebrate because life is beautiful and should be cherished. Allah gave us the option to be happy and halal at the same time. Don’t make it haram to make yourself feel good.

You impugn my intention for announcing Christmas is haram so that I can “feel good” (which isn’t true – I have conveyed the proofs and am backed up by the Ulama of Islam in declaring Christmas haram), while it is so clear that you yourself want to celebrate Christmas because, in your words: “Life is beautiful and should be cherished” it is “very cozy” and “brings your family together”, are these Shari proofs to make something haram halal? You are guilty of istihlal (making something haram halal).

If you want to celebrate Christmas, be my guest, but stop justifying it in the name our Religion Islam.

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Guest Gamila
12 minutes ago, Cherub786 said:

You impugn my intention for announcing Christmas is haram so that I can “feel good” (which isn’t true – I have conveyed the proofs and am backed up by the Ulama of Islam in declaring Christmas haram), while it is so clear that you yourself want to celebrate Christmas because, in your words: “Life is beautiful and should be cherished” it is “very cozy” and “brings your family together”, are these Shari proofs to make something haram halal? You are guilty of istihlal (making something haram halal).

If you want to celebrate Christmas, be my guest, but stop justifying it in the name our Religion Islam.

So before we look at the shari’a of hadith and scholars we use our brain. What intention do I have? To be with family? To celebrate life? To be cozy? Then let us celebrate. You’re very conservative and I respect that but not everyone can nor should be as you. Just don’t make haram which is halal and be careful with your interpretations.

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:salam:

@Cherub786 Doesn't seem to be completely haram among scholars of Ahlul Sunnah:

https://abuaminaelias.com/congratulating-non-muslims-festivals/

 

According to Sayyed Sistani:

Question: Is it permissible to exchange greetings and gifts with a non-Muslim, if he is a neighbour or a co-worker, etc.?

Answer: If he does not express hatred towards Islam and Muslims in words or actions, there is no problem in doing what is required in friendship like being good and charitable towards him. Almighty Allãh has said, “Allãh does not forbid you in regard to those who have not made war against you on account of (your) religion, and have not driven you forth from your homes, that you show them kindness and deal with them justly; surely Allãh loves the doers of justice.”

https://www.sistani.org/english/book/46/2057/

 

٦السؤال: هل يجوز المشاركة في مجالس الاعياد الغير الاسلامية ؟

الجواب: إذا كان فيه ترويج للمسيحية أو للفساد فلا يجوز .

Question: What is the ruling upon the participation in non-Islamic events?

Answer: If it includes promotion of Christianity or corruptness then it is impermissible.

http://www.sistani.org/arabic/qa/0294/


So as long as you don't promote things that are against Islam, then there is no issue. I don't think anyone will say that a Muslim these days saying 'Merry Christmas' or exchanging gifts believes Jesus (عليه السلام) to be son of God. It's just a matter of being kind. Specially considering that Christmas is more of a secular holiday rather than religous in many parts of the world.

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4 minutes ago, The Straight Path said:

According to Sayyed Sistani:

Question: Is it permissible to exchange greetings and gifts with a non-Muslim, if he is a neighbour or a co-worker, etc.?

Answer: If he does not express hatred towards Islam and Muslims in words or actions, there is no problem in doing what is required in friendship like being good and charitable towards him. Almighty Allãh has said, “Allãh does not forbid you in regard to those who have not made war against you on account of (your) religion, and have not driven you forth from your homes, that you show them kindness and deal with them justly; surely Allãh loves the doers of justice.”

https://www.sistani.org/english/book/46/2057/

٦السؤال: هل يجوز المشاركة في مجالس الاعياد الغير الاسلامية ؟

الجواب: إذا كان فيه ترويج للمسيحية أو للفساد فلا يجوز .

Question: What is the ruling upon the participation in non-Islamic events?

Answer: If it includes promotion of Christianity or corruptness then it is impermissible.

http://www.sistani.org/arabic/qa/0294/


So as long as you don't promote things that are against Islam, then there is no issue. I don't think anyone will say that a Muslim these days saying 'Merry Christmas' or exchanging gifts believes Jesus (عليه السلام) to be son of God. It's just a matter of being kind. Specially considering that Christmas is more of a secular holiday rather than religous in many parts of the world.

Interestingly, the fatawa you quoted from Sistani don’t mention Christmas at all. The first one is general, regarding giving and receiving gifts from non-Muslim co-workers and neighbors. There’s no mention of it being done to commemorate any festival or holiday. The second fatwa is regarding non-Islamic events, and Sistani specifically mentioned it is haram if it is to promote Christianity, and Christmas is definitively a Christian festival. The question is general when speaking of non-Islamic events, and not speaking of religious festivals of non-Muslims. Nevertheless, I have read other fatawa from Sistani which state that it is permissible to greet the Christians on Christmas. But I disagree with this fatwa.

9 minutes ago, The Straight Path said:

Doesn't seem to be completely haram among scholars of Ahlul Sunnah:

https://abuaminaelias.com/congratulating-non-muslims-festivals/

Let’s read some of the statements:

As for offering congratulations for rituals of unbelief specific to another religion, then it is forbidden by agreement, such as congratulating them for their holidays and their fasting”

Now the author of the article makes this comment: “Many Muslims today live in pluralistic and multicultural societies in which non-Muslims express their good wishes towards Muslims during the two Eid celebrations. The rule, in this case, is to reciprocate this kindness by sending good wishes to them during their celebrations.”

Note, this is not the fatwa of any scholar but the personal opinion of the author of the article. It is a weak argument and not a Shari evidence.

As for this argument: “The Prophet, peace and blessings be upon him, was given gifts by Khosrau and he accepted them, and kings would give him gifts and he would accept them.”

It has nothing to do with pagan festivals, but simply the permissibility of accepting gifts from non-Muslims generally. No one is disputing the permissibility of that.

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14 minutes ago, Cherub786 said:

Let’s read some of the statements:

As for offering congratulations for rituals of unbelief specific to another religion, then it is forbidden by agreement, such as congratulating them for their holidays and their fasting”

Now the author of the article makes this comment: “Many Muslims today live in pluralistic and multicultural societies in which non-Muslims express their good wishes towards Muslims during the two Eid celebrations. The rule, in this case, is to reciprocate this kindness by sending good wishes to them during their celebrations.”

Note, this is not the fatwa of any scholar but the personal opinion of the author of the article. It is a weak argument and not a Shari evidence.

As for this argument: “The Prophet, peace and blessings be upon him, was given gifts by Khosrau and he accepted them, and kings would give him gifts and he would accept them.”

It has nothing to do with pagan festivals, but simply the permissibility of accepting gifts from non-Muslims generally. No one is disputing the permissibility of that.

Not really true, you missed some of the other narrations regarding non-muslim festivals:

Abu Qabus reported: A woman asked Aisha, “We have a nurse among the Magians and they give us gifts on their festivals.” Aisha said:

أَمَّا مَا ذُبِحَ لِذَلِكَ الْيَوْمِ فَلا تَأْكُلُوا وَلَكِنْ كُلُوا مِنْ أَشْجَارِهِمْ

As for the meat they have slaughtered, then do not eat it. Rather, you may eat from the fruit of their trees.

Source: Muṣannaf Ibn Abī Shaybah 31986

Abu Barza reported: He had neighbors among the Magians who would give him gifts during their new year celebration and festivals. Abu Barza would say:

مَا كَانَ مِنْ فَاكِهَةٍ فَكُلُوهُ وَمَا كَانَ مِنْ غَيْرِ ذَلِكَ فَرُدُّوهُ

Whatever they give you of fruits, then eat it. Whatever they give you besides that, then return it.

Source: Muṣannaf Ibn Abī Shaybah 23773

Ibn Taymiyyah comments on these traditions, saying:

فهذا كله يدل على أنه لا تأثير للعيد في المنع من قبول هديتهم بل حكمها في العيد وغيره سواء لأنه ليس في ذلك إعانة لهم على شعائر كفرهم

These narrations demonstrate that non-Muslim festivals do not prevent Muslims from accepting their gifts. Rather, the rule during the festival is the same as other times since it does not involve support for their rituals of unbelief.

Source: Iqtiḍāʼ al-Ṣirāṭ al-Mustaqīm 250

The point is that it is not unconditionally haram, rather if you feel that you are agreeing to their disbelief by just greeting them etc, then don't do it. But to say that it is completely haram or blame other Muslims for doing it, that's not right.

 

May Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) guide us all to the correct path

Edited by The Straight Path
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35 minutes ago, The Straight Path said:

So as long as you don't promote things that are against Islam, then there is no issue. I don't think anyone will say that a Muslim these days saying 'Merry Christmas' or exchanging gifts believes Jesus (عليه السلام) to be son of God. It's just a matter of being kind. Specially considering that Christmas is more of a secular holiday rather than religous in many parts of the world.

In our Madhhab we make a distinction between giving gifts to a non-Muslim on their religious festival and receiving a gift from them. The first instance is haram while the second is generally approved.

Quote

Al-Zayla’i said in Tabyeen al-Haqaa’iq (6/228): Giving gifts on the occasion of Nayrooz and Mahrjaan [two non-Islamic Persian festivals] is not permissible, i.e., giving gifts on these two days is haraam, and is in fact kufr. Abu Hafs and Kabeer (may Allaah have mercy on him) said: If a man were to worship Allaah for fifty years, then on the day of Nayrooz he were to give an egg as a gift to one of the mushrikeen, intending thereby to venerate that day, he would have committed kufr and his good deeds would be cancelled out. The author of al-Jaami’ al-Asghar said: If he gives a gift to another Muslim on the day of Nayrooz, not intending thereby to venerate that day, but it is the habit of some people to give gifts on that day, then this is not regarded as kufr. But he should not do it on that particular day; he should do it before or after, so that he will not be imitating those people. The Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “Whoever imitates a people is one of them.” It says in al-Jaami’ al-Asghar: A man bought something on the day of Nayrooz which he did not buy before that. If he intended thereby to venerate that day as the mushrikoon venerate it, then he has committed kufr, but if he wanted to eat or drink or enjoy himself, then he has not committed kufr. End quote. 

It says in al-Taaj wa’l-Ikleel (a Maaliki book – 4/319): Ibn al-Qaasim regarded it as makrooh to give a gift to a Christian on the occasion of his festival, or to give palm leaves to a Jew on his festivals. End quote. 

It says in al-Iqnaa’, which is a Hanbali book: It is haraam to attend the festivals of the Jews and Christians and to sell them things or give them gifts on the occasion of their festivals. 

Moreover it is not permissible for a Muslim to give a gift to another Muslim because of this festival, as stated above when quoting the Hanafi view. Shaykh al-Islam Ibn Taymiyah (may Allaah have mercy on him) said: Whoever gives a gift to the Muslims during these festivals unlike what he usually usually at other times, his gift should not be accepted, especially if the gift is something that helps in imitating them, such as giving candles etc at Christmas, or giving eggs, milk and lambs on Maundy Thursday which comes at the end of their fast (i.e., the end of Lent). Similarly, no gift should be given to a Muslim at the time of these festivals because of the festival, especially if it is something that helps in imitating them, as we have mentioned. End quote from Iqtida’ al-Siraat al-Mustaqeem (1/227). 

As a Hanafi my Madhhab says it is forbidden to give gifts to non-Muslim on the occassion of their religious festival. Saying “merry Christmas” is defnitely haram, because it is congradulating them for a pagan rite.

What’s the harm in remaining silent? Do we regard it as rude if a non-Muslim failed to say “Eid mubarak” if it was our Eid? Of course not, we don’t expect them to greet us on our religious festivals, why should they expect us to greet them on theirs? “For you your religion and for me my Religion” it’s as simple as that.

Now you claim that Christmas has largely become a secular holiday. I beg to differ. Christmas will always be a religious Christian festival. This notion of it being “secularized” is simply to explain the tragic reality that many if not most non-Christians celebrate Christmas too because of Christian European influence over most of the world. It’s an example of religious colonialism. Until and unless the name is changed and the date (December 25) is changed, it can never be transformed into anything other than a religious festival.

I understand that in the West, many Muslims are socially pressured into participating in Christmas or at least wishing their Christian neighbors and co-workers “merry Christmas”. Such Muslims have weak faith and are in danger of being assimilated. Orthodox Jews have more honor than such Muslims because they would never say “merry Christmas” or participate in any event connected to Christmas.

I too excused myself from events organized by my employer and my school in the past which were connected to Christmas. As an orthodox Muslim, that’s the right thing to do.

During the month of December, some mischievous Christians, especially older people, go out of their way to say “merry Christmas” to me, because I am clearly dressed as a Muslim wearing a kufi and thobe. But I never give in to the pressure of acknowledging their greeting, I totally ignore it which sometimes visibly upsets them.

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8 minutes ago, The Straight Path said:

Not really true, you missed some of the other narrations regarding non-muslim festivals:

Abu Qabus reported: A woman asked Aisha, “We have a nurse among the Magians and they give us gifts on their festivals.” Aisha said:

أَمَّا مَا ذُبِحَ لِذَلِكَ الْيَوْمِ فَلا تَأْكُلُوا وَلَكِنْ كُلُوا مِنْ أَشْجَارِهِمْ

As for the meat they have slaughtered, then do not eat it. Rather, you may eat from the fruit of their trees.

Source: Muṣannaf Ibn Abī Shaybah 31986

Abu Barza reported: He had neighbors among the Magians who would give him gifts during their new year celebration and festivals. Abu Barza would say:

مَا كَانَ مِنْ فَاكِهَةٍ فَكُلُوهُ وَمَا كَانَ مِنْ غَيْرِ ذَلِكَ فَرُدُّوهُ

Whatever they give you of fruits, then eat it. Whatever they give you besides that, then return it.

Source: Muṣannaf Ibn Abī Shaybah 23773

Ibn Taymiyyah comments on these traditions, saying:

فهذا كله يدل على أنه لا تأثير للعيد في المنع من قبول هديتهم بل حكمها في العيد وغيره سواء لأنه ليس في ذلك إعانة لهم على شعائر كفرهم

These narrations demonstrate that non-Muslim festivals do not prevent Muslims from accepting their gifts. Rather, the rule during the festival is the same as other times since it does not involve support for their rituals of unbelief.

Source: Iqtiḍāʼ al-Ṣirāṭ al-Mustaqīm 250

The point is that it is not unconditionally haram, rather if you feel that you are agreeing to their disbelief by just greeting them etc, then don't do it. But to say that it is completely haram or blame other Muslims for doing it, that's not right.

 

May Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) guide us all to the correct path

Yes, thanks for pointing out these narrations. As I said in my previous post, we make a distinction between receiving and giving gifts on Christmas.

Receiving gifts from them on the occassion of Christmas is allowed but subject to conditions, namely, it shouldn’t be any food that was offered in the name of their religion or god(s). That ruling is general, from the Quran itself which forbids us to eat anything that has been offered in the name of anyone other than Allah. The gift should not be connected to the theme of their celebration, such as a candy cane, the red Santa hat, Christmas candles, and so forth. But if the gift is not connected to the theme of Christmas, like a perfume, a toy or game for children, jewelry, etc., then there’s no problem accepting it. Finally, the intention for accepting the gift should not be to honor or commemorate their religious festival.

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1 hour ago, Guest Gamila said:

So before we look at the shari’a of hadith and scholars we use our brain. What intention do I have? To be with family? To celebrate life? To be cozy? Then let us celebrate. You’re very conservative and I respect that but not everyone can nor should be as you. Just don’t make haram which is halal and be careful with your interpretations.

Pardon me but when it comes to Shari’ah rulings, the first thing we use isn’t our brain but we resort to what is stated in the texts of divine Revelation. We are talking about halal and haram, so the first criterion to determine halal and haram is Revelation and not rationality. Rationality has its place in the masa’il al-ijtihadiyah but not in the masa’il al-mansusah.

According to your logic, a Muslim can go to a church or chapel and participate in their idolatrous worship service if he or she has the intention of being part of the family, being cozy, or celebrating life.

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Well if it's haram according to your madhab then sure, but that doesn't mean it's haram in every madhab or that every scholar agrees with this point.

According to Dar al ifta Egypt, it isn't haram either (as long as you don't promote their disbelief):

https://www.dar-alifta.org/Foreign/ViewFatwa.aspx?ID=6815

 

"Commenting on the gifts that the Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him) offered non-Muslims, Al-Sarkhasi said in Sharh Al-Siyar Al-Kabir (vol. 1, p. 96), "Offering gifts to others is from among good morals as per the words of the Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him), “I was sent to establish good manners.” Scholars therefore deduced from this hadith the recommendation of exchanging gifts between Muslims and non-Muslims.
In Fath Al-'Ali Al-Malik (vol. 2, p. 349), Sheikh 'Ilish was asked whether congratulating non-Muslims is considered apostasy. He replied, "Congratulating non-Muslims by wishing them a long life is not apostasy because it does not imply venerating or admitting disbelief.”

13 minutes ago, Cherub786 said:

I understand that in the West, many Muslims are socially pressured into participating in Christmas or at least wishing their Christian neighbors and co-workers “merry Christmas”. Such Muslims have weak faith and are in danger of being assimilated. Orthodox Jews have more honor than such Muslims because they would never say “merry Christmas” or participate in any event connected to Christmas.

Really sad to read that you feel that way of Muslims simply just wishing them 'Merry Christmas', without considering their other qualities of faith. Specially since it is not generally haram in itself. But you're free to feel that. 

Won't comment further since I just wanted to highlight the Shi'i view and also show that their might be some different of opinion among your scholars as well (not saying which view is more correct according to your school since I don't have knowledge of that nor have I studied this in depth).

سلام

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Salam, 

Depends which Miraja you follow, 

Ayotullah Khemenei says there is nothing wrong with celebrating Christmas. 

And Ayotullah Sistani says its makrooh to send seasonal greetings such as "merry Christmas " to people. 

I personally don't celebrate Christmas such as putting up a tree, decorating the house, etc... I do like the atmosphere though, everyone seems happy. I do want to put lights outside my home just because I enjoy the nice colours ( also during Ramadan). 

Anyways, I do send seasonal greetings to my colleagues such as "happy holidays", "Merry Christmas", or "enjoy the holidays". My none muslim colleagues always say "eid Mubarak", or "ramadan Mubarak" , and I feel I must return the favour when it's their holidays ( also to be nice/kind). 

If you don't want to say Merry Christmas, just say enjoy the holidays since here in the west we get Christmas, Boxing Day, and New Years off.

WS 

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1 hour ago, Cherub786 said:

The significance of Ashura fasting is legislated and confirmed in our Religion, as per the Ahadith you quoted. That the pagan Arabs fasted on it doesn’t mean it is inherently pagan or of pagan origin. On the contrary, the pagan Arabs used to venerate the Ka’ba, make Tawaf, perform Hajj rites, drink from Zamzam, and so forth. Does that mean these rites are inherently pagan or of pagan origin?

Secondly, the pagan Arabs actually fasted on Ashura in imitation of the Jews. Yom Kippur is not a pagan festival, it is prescribed and legislated in the Torah itself. Comparing it to Christmas is ludicrous.

That's fresh - the kuffar of Mecca who worshipped many gods used to fast on Ashura in imitation of Jews who were monotheistic. Just when I think you can't get any more absurd...hehehe

52 minutes ago, Cherub786 said:

Interestingly, the fatawa you quoted from Sistani don’t mention Christmas at all. The first one is general, regarding giving and receiving gifts from non-Muslim co-workers and neighbors. There’s no mention of it being done to commemorate any festival or holiday. The second fatwa is regarding non-Islamic events, and Sistani specifically mentioned it is haram if it is to promote Christianity, and Christmas is definitively a Christian festival. The question is general when speaking of non-Islamic events, and not speaking of religious festivals of non-Muslims. Nevertheless, I have read other fatawa from Sistani which state that it is permissible to greet the Christians on Christmas. But I disagree with this fatwa.

It depends on the intention. I am not promoting Christianity but I do use it as an opportunity to do 'dawah'. People invariably ask if I celebrate Christmas and I always tell them that I don't celebrate Christmas but do revere Hz. Isa (Jesus) as a prophet of God; believe in the virgin birth,; miracles, etc. I also tell them how close Judaism, Christianity and Islam are and the real coup d'etat is when I tell them that the keys to the Church of Holy Sepulcher (most holy church for Christians) is possessed by a Muslim because the Christian denominations couldn't agree on ownership.

You need to broaden your mind Cherry.

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20 minutes ago, The Straight Path said:

Well if it's haram according to your madhab then sure, but that doesn't mean it's haram in every madhab or that every scholar agrees with this point.

It is apparently haram in the Hanbali madhhab too: “It says in al-Iqnaa’, which is a Hanbali book: It is haraam to attend the festivals of the Jews and Christians and to sell them things or give them gifts on the occasion of their festivals.”

I’m not sure what the ruling of the other two Madhhabs is. Apparently it is only makruh in the Maliki madhhab, but I will have to confirm that. I have no clue on the Shafi’i ruling. Ibn Taymiyah likewise regarded it as haram to give gifts to non-Muslims on the occasion of their religious festivals.

24 minutes ago, The Straight Path said:

According to Dar al ifta Egypt, it isn't haram either (as long as you don't promote their disbelief):

https://www.dar-alifta.org/Foreign/ViewFatwa.aspx?ID=6815

"Commenting on the gifts that the Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him) offered non-Muslims, Al-Sarkhasi said in Sharh Al-Siyar Al-Kabir (vol. 1, p. 96), "Offering gifts to others is from among good morals as per the words of the Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him), “I was sent to establish good manners.” Scholars therefore deduced from this hadith the recommendation of exchanging gifts between Muslims and non-Muslims.
In Fath Al-'Ali Al-Malik (vol. 2, p. 349), Sheikh 'Ilish was asked whether congratulating non-Muslims is considered apostasy. He replied, "Congratulating non-Muslims by wishing them a long life is not apostasy because it does not imply venerating or admitting disbelief.”

Firstly, Dar al-Ifta and al-Azhar in Egypt have absolutely no credibility. Not only are they institutions associated with the modernist school of thought, which is widely divergent from orthodox Sunni Islam, they are under the custody and supervision of the Egyptian State. These days only a fatwa issued by an independent and qualified Sunni legalist or scholar possesses credibility. The fatwa issued by a state institution has absolutely no credibility.

Thirdly, examine the proofs which Dar al-Ifta al-Misriyyah presented in its fatwa. They are simply those general proofs regarded giving and receiving gifts from non-Muslims with no mention of it being connected to their religious festival.

They did not present any specific evidence that it is permissible to congratulate non-Muslims on the occasion of their religious festivals, or to give them a gift to commemorate that religious festival.

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9 minutes ago, ShiaMan14 said:

It depends on the intention. I am not promoting Christianity but I do use it as an opportunity to do 'dawah'. People invariably ask if I celebrate Christmas and I always tell them that I don't celebrate Christmas but do revere Hz. Isa (Jesus) as a prophet of God; believe in the virgin birth,; miracles, etc. I also tell them how close Judaism, Christianity and Islam are and the real coup d'etat is when I tell them that the keys to the Church of Holy Sepulcher (most holy church for Christians) is possessed by a Muslim because the Christian denominations couldn't agree on ownership.

You need to broaden your mind Cherry.

What kind of da’wah is it to wish Christians “merry Christmas” and participate in their ritual of gift exchange at your workplace?

Real da’wah would be not to do these things. A curious Christian might ask you that everyone is celebrating and participating in Christmas so why not you. That is your opportunity to give Da’wah and explain something about Islam.

Participating in their religious festival only serves to validate it in their minds. It also demonstrates to them how unprincipled Muslims are.

From my experience, non-Muslims respect Muslims more if they are principled and stick firmly to their fundamental religious teachings, and they don’t really respect those Muslims who have no sense of honor and are all to eager to assimilate by watering down real differences.

During my school years, I was often asked by teachers and other students if I was going to participate in "Silent Night" or the Christmas party, etc. Why did they ask me specifically? Because they knew I was Muslim and they were unsure if a Muslim would participate in such things. Everyone else's participation was taken for granted. This proves that even non-Muslims are generally aware that Muslims aren't supposed to celebrate Christmas or participate in Christmas related events. The real surprise for them is a Muslim who does celebrate and participate in Christmas, since it goes against common sense. I suggest these non-Muslims have more common sense than many Muslims sadly.

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3 minutes ago, Cherub786 said:

What kind of da’wah is it to wish Christians “merry Christmas” and participate in their ritual of gift exchange at your workplace?

Real da’wah would be not to do these things. A curious Christian might ask you that everyone is celebrating and participating in Christmas so why not you. That is your opportunity to give Da’wah and explain something about Islam.

Participating in their religious festival only serves to validate it in their minds. It also demonstrates to them how unprincipled Muslims are.

Me not participating in their festival is not going to invalidate it in their mind. There you go with crazy talk again.

Its the kind of Dawah where Muslims don't become outcasts in the society we've chosen to live.

Its the kind of Dawah where people don't feel threatened by Muslims.

It's the kind of dawah where people become more interested in Islam.

It's the kind of dawah where us Muslims have to make up for the Sunni --> Wahabi --> Salafi --> Kharijee actions around the world.

I could go on and on.

8 minutes ago, Cherub786 said:

From my experience, non-Muslims respect Muslims more if they are principled and stick firmly to their fundamental religious teachings, and they don’t really respect those Muslims who have no sense of honor and are all to eager to assimilate by watering down real differences.

You need to get out more then. More than anything, people respect people of other faiths giving respect to their festivities. It generates brotherhood. It has nothing to do with watering down one's faith and everything to do with being a good citizen of the world.

I guess you are of the mindset that we shouldn't congratulate non-Muslims on the birth of a child or getting married, etc. 

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27 minutes ago, ShiaMan14 said:

That's fresh - the kuffar of Mecca who worshipped many gods used to fast on Ashura in imitation of Jews who were monotheistic. Just when I think you can't get any more absurd...hehehe

It depends on the intention. I am not promoting Christianity but I do use it as an opportunity to do 'dawah'. People invariably ask if I celebrate Christmas and I always tell them that I don't celebrate Christmas but do revere Hz. Isa (Jesus) as a prophet of God; believe in the virgin birth,; miracles, etc. I also tell them how close Judaism, Christianity and Islam are and the real coup d'etat is when I tell them that the keys to the Church of Holy Sepulcher (most holy church for Christians) is possessed by a Muslim because the Christian denominations couldn't agree on ownership.

You need to broaden your mind Cherry.

Especially living here in the West, we live in a majority Christian nation. If a Christian says "Merry Christmas " to me, of course I will kindly wish them happy holidays. It's respectful, kind, and considerate. Of course me saying merry Christmas to a Christian does not mean I personal support the occasion. Many Christians have wished me ramadan Mubarak, and eid Mubarak. This is because I have developed positive relationships with other persons of faith, and they themselves love to wish me greetings on my special occasions. And I'm really happy that they have, it shows respect, and an inclusive environment. Also, I am quit grateful that my nation has accepted my faith, enabled me to practice it openly, acknowledged islamic holidays, and has protected it. 

If my nation had a zero tolerance rule of not accepting another persons faith, holidays etc.... then this would be a narrow minded, intolerant, and in-exclusive society. 

Also many people don't celebrate Christmas for the religious factor, but more of the social aspect of it.... getting together with family, giving, spending time with loved ones etc...... most people do not go to church.... 

But this is my own personal opinion..

Also lets not forget about the Prophet seeking protection from a Christian Abyssinian king, and the Ashtiname treaty............ 

 

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51 minutes ago, Cherub786 said:

Pardon me but when it comes to Shari’ah rulings, the first thing we use isn’t our brain but we resort to what is stated in the texts of divine Revelation. We are talking about halal and haram, so the first criterion to determine halal and haram is Revelation and not rationality. Rationality has its place in the masa’il al-ijtihadiyah but not in the masa’il al-mansusah.

According to your logic, a Muslim can go to a church or chapel and participate in their idolatrous worship service if he or she has the intention of being part of the family, being cozy, or celebrating life.

Pardon me you. To the last part yes. It’s still God’s house? Intentions are really everything.

 

We’re not gonna agree on anything I see. 

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2 minutes ago, ShiaMan14 said:

Me not participating in their festival is not going to invalidate it in their mind. There you go with crazy talk again.

If they respect you as a person due to your personal merits you not participating in their Christmas may not exactly invalidate Christmas in their minds, but will at the very least create confusion in their minds regarding Christmas. At the very least they won’t take it for granted that the whole world celebrates Christmas, as many Westerners seem to think. On the other hand, you participating in Christmas will serve to validate it in their minds. Seeing a Muslim celebrating Christmas sends a very wrong message that we are okay with their pagan festival.

Quote

Its the kind of Dawah where Muslims don't become outcasts in the society we've chosen to live.

What does it say about a society that makes people outcasts simply for not celebrating Christmas?

It’s better to be an outcast from such a society anyways. It’s better to have honor and follow Islam than seek validation from society. That’s the essential message of the Quran in a nutshell by the way.

And to a certain degree, I argue that Muslims should be detached from mainstream society, for the purpose of protecting our separate identity and to avoid assimilation.

Quote

Its the kind of Dawah where people don't feel threatened by Muslims.

And how is not participating in Christmas “threatening” in any way? Ironic that you accuse me of crazy talk.

If you want to talk about irrational fear of Muslims (Islamophobia), I think the first example isn’t that Muslims don’t celebrate Christmas, it is other things like hijab/burqa, Halal meat, animal sacrifice on Eid al-Qurban, mega-mosques complete with minarets, infant male circumcision, young Muslim males keeping facial hair, wearing kufis and thobes in public, not shaking hands with the opposite gender, and so forth. Should we abandon all these things too simply because non-Muslims may have an irrational fear or feel threatened by them?

Quote

It's the kind of dawah where people become more interested in Islam.

I fail to see how people will become more interested in Islam if they see Muslims, like pretty much everyone else, celebrating Christmas. Muslims don’t stand out from the crowd by celebrating Christmas. Interest is sparked by being different from the crowd.

Quote

It's the kind of dawah where us Muslims have to make up for the Sunni --> Wahabi --> Salafi --> Kharijee actions around the world.

Perhaps you should also start praying to statues of the Virgin Mary in a chapel with your Christian friends, on Christmas, Easter and other times of the year, to make up for the tarnished image of Islam in their minds due to Kharijite terrorism around the world.

Quote

You need to get out more then. More than anything, people respect people of other faiths giving respect to their festivities. It generates brotherhood. It has nothing to do with watering down one's faith and everything to do with being a good citizen of the world.

It would generate a lot of brotherhood if you visit the chapel from time to time and kneel before a statue of the Virgin Mary and light some candles in her honor, along with burning some incense to the Christian god Jesus?

It seems your concept of Tabarra is only reserved for the Prophet’s Companions and Wives رضى الله عنهم but not for non-Muslims and their false religions. This explains why we Sunni Muslims regard the Shi'ah as, how should I put it, not exactly Muslims of an equal footing.

Quote

I guess you are of the mindset that we shouldn't congratulate non-Muslims on the birth of a child or getting married, etc.

I’m not against it, but like I said, we Muslims should be socially detached and maintain some distance from non-Muslims.

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18 minutes ago, Cherub786 said:

If they respect you as a person due to your personal merits you not participating in their Christmas may not exactly invalidate Christmas in their minds, but will at the very least create confusion in their minds regarding Christmas. At the very least they won’t take it for granted that the whole world celebrates Christmas, as many Westerners seem to think. On the other hand, you participating in Christmas will serve to validate it in their minds. Seeing a Muslim celebrating Christmas sends a very wrong message that we are okay with their pagan festival.

What does it say about a society that makes people outcasts simply for not celebrating Christmas?

It’s better to be an outcast from such a society anyways. It’s better to have honor and follow Islam than seek validation from society. That’s the essential message of the Quran in a nutshell by the way.

And to a certain degree, I argue that Muslims should be detached from mainstream society, for the purpose of protecting our separate identity and to avoid assimilation.

And how is not participating in Christmas “threatening” in any way? Ironic that you accuse me of crazy talk.

If you want to talk about irrational fear of Muslims (Islamophobia), I think the first example isn’t that Muslims don’t celebrate Christmas, it is other things like hijab/burqa, Halal meat, animal sacrifice on Eid al-Qurban, mega-mosques complete with minarets, infant male circumcision, young Muslim males keeping facial hair, wearing kufis and thobes in public, not shaking hands with the opposite gender, and so forth. Should we abandon all these things too simply because non-Muslims may have an irrational fear or feel threatened by them?

I fail to see how people will become more interested in Islam if they see Muslims, like pretty much everyone else, celebrating Christmas. Muslims don’t stand out from the crowd by celebrating Christmas. Interest is sparked by being different from the crowd.

Perhaps you should also start praying to statues of the Virgin Mary in a chapel with your Christian friends, on Christmas, Easter and other times of the year, to make up for the tarnished image of Islam in their minds due to Kharijite terrorism around the world.

It would generate a lot of brotherhood if you visit the chapel from time to time and kneel before a statue of the Virgin Mary and light some candles in her honor, along with burning some incense to the Christian god Jesus?

It seems your concept of Tabarra is only reserved for the Prophet’s Companions and Wives رضى الله عنهم but not for non-Muslims and their false religions. This explains why we Sunni Muslims regard the Shi'ah as, how should I put it, not exactly Muslims of an equal footing.

I’m not against it, but like I said, we Muslims should be socially detached and maintain some distance from non-Muslims.

Salam brother, 

By your logic you must be living in a middle-eastern nation.... but I double checked and saw your location to be in Canada. Based off of your logic, if you're a Canadian citizen that means you have actually agreed to adhere to living in a multicultural society, under a Christian influenced legal system. and to adhere to her majesty ( the Queen). essentially you are supporting the government, and everything that they do.  . this is all very VERY un-islamic and not part of the Shariah..... 

 

 

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