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In the Name of God بسم الله
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Black Lives Matter [OFFICIAL]

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Note: This topic is of a sensitive nature dealing with current events, with a range of opinions presented, which some readers might find objectionable. Please refer to credible sources when assessing any factual claims presented. Racist language of any kind will not be tolerated, per ShiaChat guidelines.

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56 minutes ago, Haydar Husayn said:

You know nobody here has a problem accepting that police brutality goes on and gets covered up. If you disagree, then please quote people saying the opposite. If you can't, then just stop pretending that they do.

You've clearly posted that the movement is not an organization, but a loosely affiliated group of organizations and individuals who have united for the common purpose of ending police brutality and racial profiling. Are you saying Muslims should not ally themselves to others who support our values on some issues to fight for those issues, because we disagree with them on other issues? Because if that's what you're saying, it sounds like an argument for maintaining the status quo. 

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9 minutes ago, notme said:

You've clearly posted that the movement is not an organization, but a loosely affiliated group of organizations and individuals who have united for the common purpose of ending police brutality and racial profiling. Are you saying Muslims should not ally themselves to others who support our values on some issues to fight for those issues, because we disagree with them on other issues? Because if that's what you're saying, it sounds like an argument for maintaining the status quo. 

It's a false dichotomy. The same response could be said about the war in Iraq or defeating the Umayyads. Every time the West wants to attack another country they create this false dichotomy between supporting war and supporting the status quo. I can agree with the desirability of deposing a tyrant without agreeing to 'collateral damage'.

Not agreeing to support a bunch of radical social revolutionaries doesn't mean I agree with the status quo, or want to maintain it. But the fact that there are aspect of the status quo that I don't like doesn't mean I will like the new regime any better, or that I want to destroy all aspects of the status quo. You seem to think that these other issues are small trivialities, when those inside the movement clearly see them as central to their message (otherwise why display them so prominently on their websites?). Just look at how the movement has already morphed. It's gone from protesting against police brutality, to protesting against 'White supremacy', to tearing down statues of anyone who's views on race they find objectionable. So they've already strayed quite far from what it was they were supposed to be protesting about.

The reality is this is a radical leftist movement, made up of several radical leftist organisations, that are using the issue of police brutality to push a far more wide-ranging agenda that is completely antithetical to Islamic values (even if, just like with most political movements, there are some areas of agreement) and hence destructive to the well-being of society. Their policies in the long run would make things worse, not better, because they would replace one evil with a greater one. If someone puts forward sensible proposals to reduce racism in society, then I will support those, but that doesn't commit me to supporting every measure that claims to reduce racism.

Anyway, I don't expect you to agree with me. What I would like is that you take my arguments in good faith, and stop acting like I'm an apologist for racism or racists. It's perfectly possible to disagree on matters like this without making it personal. As it happens, I think this movement will end up being very dangerous for Muslims in the West, but despite that I don't attack those who oppose me as being somehow morally deficient. It's just a matter of judgement, and everyone is entitled to make their own.

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8 hours ago, LeftCoastMom said:

Some of the native front-liners guarding the neighborhoods have run off white supremacist groups bent on destruction.

Sad.

What we do not need are groups street fighting each other and having this degenerate into gunfights.

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^ It didn't degenerate into a gunfight.

The Mini-Klan left when they saw the AIM warriors. 

I was was wondering if the tall and silent Anishinaabe  woman ,dressed all in black with a huge black bow and midnight -colored arrows ( apparently she preferred dealing with potential problems old-school), got to ventilate anyone,but probably not. Lol.

 

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I quoted the racist statements of a BLM activist earlier in the thread, which contained comments such as:

Quote

“Whiteness is not humxness,” reads the statement. “in fact, white skin is sub-humxn.”

“White ppl are recessive genetic defects. this is factual,” the post later says. “white ppl need white supremacy as a mechanism to protect their survival as a people because all they can do is produce themselves. black ppl simply through their dominant genes can literally wipe out the white race if we had the power to.”

https://thepostmillennial.com/blm-toronto-leader-believes-white-people-are-sub-human-calls-them-genetic-defects

And now I've just seen this:

 

Apparently this racist lunacy is actually some kind of 'theory' called melanin theory:

Quote

Melanin theory is a claim in Afrocentrism that a higher level of melanin, the primary determinant of skin color in humans, is the cause of an intellectual and physical superiority of dark-skinned people and provides them with superior abilities or even mystical/supernatural ones. It is a racist, pseudoscientific theory.[1][2][3][4][5]

According to Bernard Ortiz De Montellano of Wayne State University, "The alleged properties of melanin, mostly unsupported, irrelevant, or distortions of the scientific literature, are (...) used to justify Afrocentric assertions. One of the most common is that humans evolved as blacks in Africa, and that whites are mutants (albinos, or melanin recessives)".[6][7] The melanin hypothesis was supported by Leonard Jeffries, who according to Time magazine, believes that "melanin, the dark skin pigment, gives blacks intellectual and physical superiority over whites".[8]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melanin_theory

 

I'm glad to see that wikipedia still know what racism is, but this kind of stuff should make people wonder whether defining racism in such a way so as to exclude the possibility of it applying to certain groups of people is such a good idea.

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23 minutes ago, Haydar Husayn said:

I'm glad to see that wikipedia still know what racism is, but this kind of stuff should make people wonder whether defining racism in such a way so as to exclude the possibility of it applying to certain groups of people is such a good idea.

Aren’t the people you’re showing here as redefining racism rather fringe hyper ideological voices? What evidence do you have that these concepts are mainstream or widely accepted in any way? Most people haven’t heard of these individuals, how much influence do they really have?

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22 minutes ago, Reza said:

Aren’t the people you’re showing here as redefining racism rather fringe hyper ideological voices? What evidence do you have that these concepts are mainstream or widely accepted in any way? Most people haven’t heard of these individuals, how much influence do they really have?

Nick Cannon is hardly unknown: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nick_Cannon

But even if he was, do we have to wait for something to become completely mainstream before calling it out? Sometimes it's worth trying to spot emerging trends. As of yet, we haven't seen the kind of consequences for these individuals as we would have if people had been making blatantly white racial supremacist statements.

 

EDIT: I typed Nick Cannon into twitter to see what people thought about this, and most of the comments seemed to be in support of him. What might end up getting into trouble is that there were also some anti-Semetic comments made. So if he does get 'cancelled' it will be for that.

Edited by Haydar Husayn

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16 minutes ago, Haydar Husayn said:

Nick Cannon is hardly unknown: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nick_Cannon

But even if he was, do we have to wait for something to become completely mainstream before calling it out? Sometimes it's worth trying to spot emerging trends.

Seems like you’re giving them more attention than is warranted. Most people don’t follow these individuals or use their theories to guide their social or political views. What proof do you have that these are “emerging trends”?

Quote

As of yet, we haven't seen the kind of consequences for these individuals as we would have if people had been making blatantly white racial supremacist statements.

Because white supremacist sentiments have a loaded historical past that led to mass enslavement and disenfranchisement, so the consequences and reactions are more severe. The alternative sentiments you are being alarmist about have not had the same impact, and likely never will.

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22 minutes ago, Reza said:

Seems like you’re giving them more attention than is warranted. Most people don’t follow these individuals or use their theories to guide their social or political views. What proof do you have that these are “emerging trends”?

There isn't a single person on earth that 'most people' follow, so that's not a sensible criteria to decide whether something is worthy of discussion or not. The fact is that he's a famous person making racist comments, and his following is not insignificant.

 

22 minutes ago, Reza said:

Because white supremacist sentiments have a loaded historical past that led to mass enslavement and disenfranchisement, so the consequences and reactions are more severe. The alternative sentiments you are being alarmist about have not had the same impact, and likely never will.

So unless some bad will have the kind of extreme consequences that white supremacist statements had, then they aren't worth discussing? Making white supremacist statements in the modern age is not going to bring back mass enslavement either, but we still strongly criticise it.

An evil is an evil, no matter how big or small. In Islam there is no distinction between white on black or black on white `asabiyya. It's all the same before God, and from an Islamic point of view any type of `asabiyya is harmful. There isn't much point only being worried about one particular manifestation of it, while letting the others run rampant.

Muhammad ibn Ya’qub (al-Kulayni), from ‘Ali ibn Ibrahim, from his father, from al-Nawfali, from al-Sakuni, who reports on the authority of Abu ‘Abd Allah (Imam al-Sadiq ) (A) that the Prophet (S) said, “Whosoever possesses in his heart ‘asabiyyah (prejudice in any of its forms such as tribalism, racism, nationalism) even to the extent of a mustard seed, God will raise him on the Day of Resurrection with the (pagan) Bedouins of the Jahiliyyah (the pre-Islamic era).”

https://www.al-islam.org/forty-hadith-an-exposition-second-edition-imam-khomeini/eighth-hadith-prejudice-asabiyyah

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4 minutes ago, Haydar Husayn said:

There isn't a single person on earth that 'most people' follow, so that's not a sensible criteria to decide whether something is worthy of discussion or not. The fact is that he's a famous person making racist comments, and his following is not insignificant.

It’s not about what most people follow, it’s what most people don’t follow, which are the sources you pull, insisting they are emerging trends we should be alarmed about. The burden of relevance is on you, since you keep putting these out.

11 minutes ago, Haydar Husayn said:

So unless some bad will have the kind of extreme consequences that white supremacist statements had, then they aren't worth discussing?

Yes actually, because not everything has equal priority or urgency, especially when it hasn’t been proven its impact is significant or consequential enough. Unless one’s priorities are different.

13 minutes ago, Haydar Husayn said:

Making white supremacist statements in the modern age is not going to bring back mass enslavement either, but we still strongly criticise it.

What about the modern prison population, of which slave labor is a component? Do you disagree that white supremacist sentiments influence the skewed prison demographics?

14 minutes ago, Haydar Husayn said:

An evil is an evil, no matter how big or small. In Islam there is no distinction between white on black or black on white `asabiyya. It's all the same before God, and from an Islamic point of view any type of `asabiyya is harmful. There isn't much point only being worried about one particular manifestation of it, while letting the others run rampant.

A poor person stealing food is seen differently than a wealthy person doing it.

Since white racism against blacks is talked about in the media more than ever, is your pulling every source you can find in the opposite direction an attempt at overcompensation?

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1 hour ago, Haydar Husayn said:

Nick Cannon is hardly unknown

Most Black Americans take a disliking to Nick Cannon. For instance, his rapping is notorious for being garbage. I mean he's genuinely one of the worst. Further, from the little of his show I've seen (it's mostly haram), he gets openly dogged on his own show (Wild'n out). Even on his show he seems to genuinely hate the White rappers (probably because of how badly Eminem has dissed him and Mariah in the past, lol), but it doesn't really matter because the Black rappers sense this, and in response clown on him for not "really" being black, or not being "black enough", and him being corny and mainstream, and they always clown on him by saying he misses his ex-wife Mariah Carey, etc.  :hahaha:

There is seriously something wrong with the dude. How's he going to be racist when he used to host the "Whitest" show ever, i.e. America's Got Talent. :hahaha:

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1 hour ago, Reza said:

It’s not about what most people follow, it’s what most people don’t follow, which are the sources you pull, insisting they are emerging trends we should be alarmed about. The burden of relevance is on you, since you keep putting these out.

I didn’t say anyone should be ‘alarmed’. It’s always best to stay calm in all circumstances. I’m just discussing it, that’s all. Isn’t that what a forum is supposed to be for? If people find it uninteresting then they won’t reply and the discussion will quickly die.

1 hour ago, Reza said:

Yes actually, because not everything has equal priority or urgency, especially when it hasn’t been proven its impact is significant or consequential enough. Unless one’s priorities are different.

I didn’t realise there was now such a high threshold to discuss things on this forum. If that’s the case, no wonder there isn’t much activity.

1 hour ago, Reza said:

What about the modern prison population, of which slave labor is a component? Do you disagree that white supremacist sentiments influence the skewed prison demographics?

They may or may not. I haven’t studied it in enough depth to be able to make any definitive statements. My gut feeling is that they probably do play some role, yes.

1 hour ago, Reza said:

A poor person stealing food is seen differently than a wealthy person doing it.

That’s some seriously bad qiyas.

1 hour ago, Reza said:

Since white racism against blacks is talked about in the media more than ever, is your pulling every source you can find in the opposite direction an attempt at overcompensation?

No, that’s not what I’m doing at all. My posts on this topic go back years, from before BLM was everyone’s favourite social justice cause. I think the movement contains many problematic aspects for Muslims, and I’m giving some examples of that.

Of course, it’s just my opinion, but I’m a little troubled by how some moderators seem to be defending this movement as if it’s some part of our religion. It’s very unusual in my experience to encounter this level of hostility in a thread in the politics section outside of topics to do with Iran. I fully understand that you support this movement, and don’t like my posts on the subject, but as an admin on the forum it would seem a bit strange to want to shut down discussion and debate. Isn’t that the lifeblood of forums? Or should everyone just agree and talk about how amazing BLM are and the only point of discussion being which statue should next be pulled down?

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On 7/10/2020 at 2:55 PM, LeftCoastMom said:

For what it's worth: SG says most Shia communities have "serious racism problems" and can hardly be expected to understand race issues in the US until the Shia community here "grows up and faces reality ...or the old people die off. "

 

He's being a bit parochial and likely conflating colourism with racism. The former term refers to the preference for fair skin, leptorrhine noses and so on.

 

Quote

 

South Asian anti-black racism: 'We don't marry black people'

Amit is Indian and kept his relationship with Michelle, who’s Ghanaian, secret for years - because he feared his family’s reaction. He says that racist attitudes about black people in his community can be influenced by colourism and the caste system.

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/newsbeat-53395935/south-asian-anti-black-racism-we-don-t-marry-black-people

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11 hours ago, Haji 2003 said:

He's being a bit parochial and likely conflating colourism with racism. The former term refers to the preference for fair skin, leptorrhine noses and so on.

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/newsbeat-53395935/south-asian-anti-black-racism-we-don-t-marry-black-people

What makes you say that? Many Shias, just like many Muslims generally, do have genuinely racist views towards blacks.

https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/outrageous-racism-graced-arab-tv-ramadan-180616134620046.html

Even North African Muslims are pretty racist towards other Africans:

https://www.nytimes.com/2008/12/10/opinion/10iht-edeltahawy.1.18556273.html

 

We could trawl through this website and find plenty of racist attitudes towards black people. To start with, just look at how people react when you tell them that many Imams (عليه السلام) had black mothers.

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On 7/14/2020 at 6:17 PM, Haydar Husayn said:

Apparently this racist lunacy is actually some kind of 'theory' called melanin theory

Since the release of that podcast, Viacom has fired Nick Cannon from his show "Wild'n Out" (which airs on VH1). He was fired due to anti-semitic remarks. Note how he wasn't fired for the anti-white remarks which was the overwhelming majority of the video. Nick Cannon soon after apologized to Jewish people for his anti-semitic remarks. Note that he did not apologize to White People. FOX has decided to not fire him from hosting the "Masked Singer".

Edited by AmirioTheMuzzy

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1 hour ago, AmirioTheMuzzy said:

Since the release of that podcast, Viacom has fired Nick Cannon from his show "Wild'n Out" (which airs on VH1). He was fired due to anti-semitic remarks. Note how he wasn't fired for the anti-white remarks which was the overwhelming majority of the video. Nick Cannon soon after apologized to Jewish people for his anti-semitic remarks. Note that he did not apologize to White People. FOX has decided to not fire him from hosting the "Masked Singer".

Yeah, I think I predicted earlier that if anything was going to get him in trouble, it would be the antisemitism. In the current climate a lot of people seem to think they have license to spew all kinds of nonsense about white people, and some extend that to Jewish people (who obviously look white), which shows a lack of understanding of the rules of the game. Antisemitism is still a big no-no, despite what the Zionist morons say (they apparently think it’s the only kind of racism you can’t get cancelled for, but that’s only because they can’t tell the difference between antisemitism and anti-Zionism).

But never mind, I think P Diddy, or whether he’s calling himself these days, wants to offer him a job.

Quote

Following the criticism, Diddy has offered Cannon a place at Revolt, writing: “@NickCannon come home to @REVOLTTV truly BLACK OWNED!!!

“We got your back and love you and what you have done for the culture. We are for our people first!!! For us! By US! Let’s go!!!”

https://www.nme.com/news/music/diddy-offers-nick-cannon-job-at-revolt-following-recent-controversy-2708997

 

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27 minutes ago, Haydar Husayn said:

P Diddy

Lol, another very much hated individual in the black community.

Edit: For example, he had a serious hand in orchestrating the East Coast - West Coast rivalry of the 90s that left Tupac and Biggie dead.

Edited by AmirioTheMuzzy

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George Floyd's family sues Minnesota police

Quote

”This complaint shows what we have said all along, that Mr Floyd died because the weight of the entire Minneapolis Police Department was on his neck,” said Ben Crump, one of the attorneys who filed the lawsuit. “The city of Minneapolis has a history of policies, procedures and deliberate indifference that violates the rights of arrestees, particularly black men, and highlights the need for officer training and discipline.”

The 46-year-old unarmed black man died after a white police officer kept knelt on his neck and pinned him to the ground for nine minutes in Minneapolis, Minnesota on May 25.

“This is an unprecedented case, and with this lawsuit we seek to set a precedent that makes it financially prohibitive for police to wrongfully kill marginalized people – especially black people – in the future,” read the lawsuit.

I’m not that kind of guy,” Floyd says as he struggles against the officers. “I just had Covid, man, I don’t want to go back to that.” An onlooker pleads with Floyd to stop struggling, saying: “You can’t win!” Floyd replies: “I don’t want to win!”

https://en.abna24.com/news//george-floyds-family-sues-minnesota-police_1055496.html

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Supporting  of black community  of Yemen ( Al Mahmashin   المهمشین ) from Ansarullah & it's leader (photos)   

حمایت سیاهپوستان یمن از رهبر و رزمندگان انصارالله  حمایت سیاهپوستان یمن از رهبر و رزمندگان انصارالله  حمایت سیاهپوستان یمن از رهبر و رزمندگان انصارالله 

حمایت سیاهپوستان یمن از رهبر و رزمندگان انصاراللهhttps://fa.abna24.com/news/عکس-و-گزارش-تصويري/حمایت-سیاهپوستان-یمن-از-رهبر-و-رزمندگان-انصارالله_772822.html

 

 

Edited by Ashvazdanghe

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3 hours ago, Silas said:

...

@Silas

While I do not disagree with the substance of your impressions, some historical background and clarification is in order.

First, Herbert Marcuse was not actually much of a Marxist, at least in the traditional sense. Nor was he of working-class, “proletarian” background. He was born into an assimilated, bourgeois, Jewish familial milieu in the German Empire, specifically Berlin, at the end of the nineteenth century. He was a romantic idealist rather than a sober materialist who once worked for the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), the precursor to the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), during World War II. He opposed Stalinism and later even discouraged his students from actually studying and reading Karl Marx’s writings. In the late 1950s, the Soviet Communist press organ Pravda accused Marcuse of emasculating Marxism-Leninism via the postmodernist, Trotskyist-Zionist Frankfurt School, which aimed, unlike Marx and his successors, to dissolve rationalism.

The thing is, virtually all the socialist states inspired by Marxism-Leninism were very traditional and conservative in social, as opposed to economic, matters, including the roles of husband and wife, sexual deviation, dress, patriotism, etc. High culture and secularised religious values were prised. For example, the USSR criminalised homosexuality in the 1930s, and most other Communist-ruled states followed suit. They also restricted abortion to promote a large work force for industry.

As far as Fidel Castro and Nicolás Maduro are concerned, neither of them has promoted any of the degeneracy that BLM promotes, hence the Islamic Republic of Iran’s longtime, reciprocal support for both Cuba and Venezuela, each a frontline of anti-imperialism. The “activist” and “cop-killer” who fled to Cuba, Angela Davis, was in fact closely tied to the CIA via the Ford Foundation and other major capitalist institutions that were seeking to infiltrate and undermine Marxism-Leninism from within.

The “counterculture” of the ‘50s–‘70s, the youth movement, the feminist movement, eugenics, abortion, etc., including exponents and proponents such as the Beetles, Gloria Steinem, and Margaret Sanger, were closely tied to major capitalist institutions and were considered bourgeois (or even fascist/Zionist) decadence by the Communist states, hence the Eastern Bloc’s ban on such imports as rock music, the drug culture, jeans, etc.

Therefore, just as one should not judge a religion or its followers by caricatures and straw men, so one should not judge an ideology by the work of infiltrators and saboteurs.

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Northwest:

Yes, you are correct in the sense that BLM is not traditionally Marxist-Leninist, even though they claim to be at times (depending who they are talking to)

It is more intersectionalism, post-modernism, irrationalism, and Cultural Marxism that moves them. It is a witch's brew of bad ideas, absurd claims, etc.

And even though they denounce capitalism, they are quick to accept large donations from IT companies, financial firms (Bank of America gave them tens of millions recently), etc. 

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In the context of international circumstances, I think a circumstantial case can be made that the entire “George Floyd affair” was stage-managed, initiated, and choreographed with a specific agenda in mind. As in many other PSYOPs or pseudo-events (to paraphrase Daniel J. Boorstin), including other protests, school shootings, etc., it served a larger agenda and context: a hidden, globalist strategy. The amount of attention it received, the collegial ties between the “victim” and “perpetrator,” the well-financed “anti-racist/anti-cop” campaign, the prepared “talking points” by both the “left” and the “right,” the presence of agents provocateur (“leftist” ANTIFA and “rightist” Boogaloo Boys) at rallies, the peculiar timing of the event in relation to domestic and international politics, i.e. the ongoing COVID-19 spike or “second wave,” the calls for more lockdowns, the machinations of the global immunisation movement vis-à-vis the pharmaceutical-financial cartel, e.g., the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the proliferation of conflicts between the Zionist-dominated West and China, Russia, Iran, et al., the spread of extremist and shady movements from Wahhabism to Hindu fascism to postmodernist identity politics to Pentecostal Zionism, the increasingly kinetic tempo of Western operations against rival powers, ranging from ever-more-punitive sanctions—directed against loyal proxies as well as ardent resistors alike—to withdrawal from multilateral treaties, the reversal of globalisation via tariffs and COVID-19-driven hysteria, increasingly brazen stunts such as the seizure of foreign assets and even the open deployment of biowarfare and/or other unconventional weapons, the threat Eurasian integration under the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) poses to Anglo-Zionist Imperial hegemony: all these things combined tell me that something big and ominous is afoot, the precursor to a major global conflagration, while the masses are largely distracted, disinterested, oppressed, demoralised, and degenerated.

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My timing is apparently good. l found this an hour ago in a box of papers. No other citation than the one shown.

 

"The are a class of colored people who make a business of keeping troubles, the wrongs, and the hardships of the negro race before the public. Some of these people do not want the negro to lose his grievances, because they do not want to lose their jobs. There is a certain class race-problem solvers who don't want the patient to get well."  Booker T. Washington, 1911

 

While typing the end of this, l remember a social-service scandal from the 80s.  Youth counselors were recorded prowling parks and other youth hangouts, engaging isolated children in conversation, and then  encouraging them to do things, such as runaway from home. These social-workers were doing this to inflate their case management porfolios and budget allocations.

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Photos: Anti-racism protests in Portland, USA

https://en.abna24.com/news//photos-anti-racism-protests-in-portland-usa_1057210.html

July 23, 2020 - 10:23 AM News Code : 1057210 Source : ABNA24Link: 

 

AhlulBayt News Agency (ABNA): Anti-racism protests held in Portland, USA. The American people condemned the killing of "George Floyd" by US police.

تظاهرات ضد نژادپرستی در \ تظاهرات ضد نژادپرستی در \ تظاهرات ضد نژادپرستی در \

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On 7/20/2020 at 5:20 PM, Silas said:

The BLM people had their guard down because they thought they were in friendly territory. I saw the Imam was clearly troubled by their rhetoric and behavior, and many members quietly left the building. At one point, the women who gave the speech was trying to make some case about how Islam can be joined with Marxism to overthrow the ruling class and destroy "whiteness". The Muslim man talking to her clearly disagreed. I was one of the only white guys there save for a couple women. The BLM people looked at me like they wanted to kill me, and later followed me to my car in the parking lot.

First, why would this BLM movement follow Karl Marx' teachings? From their point of view Marx was a white guy. And no matter how good his arguments would sound, they are arguments of a white German.

Second, people tend to become something, like Marxist, fascist etc. As soon as they see the teachings of an ideology, they follow it blindly, without having ever read the pro and con arguments about it. They also don’t see the historical context. Even if all of arguments of Karl Marx were valid and true, which in fact they aren't, they were only true in his time and era, as he was no prophet or anything similar. That's why he didn't write about environment, AI etc., as he couldn't anticipate those developments. His main arguments were about the exploitation of humans following the Industrial Revolution. Marx created his assumptions mainly around the Industrial Revolution and its consequences.

In 1992 German philosopher Helmut Fleischer wrote in his essay about Marxists: "Marxists have changed their Marx so much so that it has become necessary to interpret him differently: rather in an historic context than as a doctrinaire-eccentric figure."

Other than that one can only say to those BLM members who are Muslim, that Islamic teachings suffice to be against racism.

Third, why didn't the BLM movement show any kind of solidarity with people who are not black and discriminated against? How about Mexican children who were separated from their parents in the USA. Okay, you can argument that people fight only for their own kind. So if there are Muslims in the BLM, why didn’t those people showed solidarity when Muslims from certain other countries were banned from entering the USA only because they were Muslim?

Even if Malcolm X has lived more than 50 years ago, he was way ahead of these wannabe activists today. At least he included "black, brown, red and yellow" people in his fight against racism. Unfortunately, nowadays people are self-centred and only show activism when their own kind is mistreated.

Edited by lover

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Academics blame black social problems on white oppression. By that logic, the problems should have been worst prior to the civil rights reforms in the 1960s. But in fact the opposite occurred. The collapse of the black family occurred mostly after civil rights rather than before. Most blacks came from a highly collective society in Africa, then lived under slavery and Jim Crow in the South. Those structures kept disorder at a low level. In that era, black levels of crime and female-headedness were not much higher than among whites. But blacks lost that structure after many migrated to the Northern cities in the last century, and especially after Jim Crow was abolished in the 1960s. So black social problems escalated even as opportunities broadened.Footnote 13

Full paper here:

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12115-020-00496-1

Author is Lawrence Mead.

 

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On 7/22/2020 at 2:22 AM, hasanhh said:

"The are a class of colored people who make a business of keeping troubles, the wrongs, and the hardships of the negro race before the public. Some of these people do not want the negro to lose his grievances, because they do not want to lose their jobs. There is a certain class race-problem solvers who don't want the patient to get well."  Booker T. Washington, 1911

This quote could apply to pretty much all professional activists. If the problem went away, so would their jobs, and a good chunk of their identities, so it’s in their interests for the problem to remain forever, and not just that, but for things to always be as bad, if not worse, than they’ve ever been. The patriarchy and white supremacy are apparently as strong as they’ve ever been.

These types of people aren’t interested in compromise or conciliation. They thrive on conflict and unrest.

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"A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed." 

I suppose having one regulated militia does need a certain level of social harmony. 

Otherwise you end up with this.

31195208-8559841-image-a-43_159570904800

 

31189658-8559841-image-a-16_159569553979

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:hahaha: O.M.G.

A local high school is going to change its logo in response to Native-America criticism. Why?

The horror, the horrors

They call themselves Warriors

 

Q: What could possible be 'offensive' about that?

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