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In the Name of God بسم الله

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1 minute ago, Guest SomeRandomMuzzy said:

it still wouldn't compare to what the Aga Khan has done for the Ummah.

Can you share a few examples?

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Guest SomeRandomMuzzy

Of course, and I ask your forgiveness for not providing evidence of my statement before. Please keep in mind this is only a quick list does not take into account the time when the Aga Khan helped his people flee the Ugandan genocide or the countless other things he has done or helped create.

Please find a quick list below,

AKA     Aga Khan Academies
-The Aga Khan Academies network is constructing 18 residential campuses in Africa, the Middle East and Asia that will feature a rigorous and locally relevant curriculum based on the International Baccalaureate.

-Over 2 million students benefit from AKDN education programmes annually.


AKAH     Aga Khan Agency for Habitat
-AKDN has planted 100 million trees in Pakistan through programmes that address deforestation, transform degraded environments into productive green spaces, and mitigate the effects of climate change

-Each year, 1.3 million people living in some of the poorest rural and urban areas of the developing world have better access to safe drinking water, sanitation and sewage facilities provided by the AKDN

-Over a 20-year period, the AKDN Water and Sanitation Extension Programme has provided WHO-quality water installations for more than 100,000 households in the northern Pakistan

AKAM     Aga Khan Agency for Microfinance
-Over the last decade the Aga Khan Agency for Microfinance has disbursed $2 billion worth of loans in an effort to make lasting improvements in the quality of life of the poor

-There are 13 branches of AKDN’s microfinance bank (Premiere Agence de Microfinance) in the Sofia region of Madagascar, which on average disburses 10,000+ loans per year.

-90% of clients served by the First Micro Credit Company in the Kyrgyz Republic are from peri-urban and rural areas

AKES     Aga Khan Education Services
-Over 2 million students benefit from AKDN education programmes annually. Programmes range from early childhood development to primary and secondary schools, from vocational studies to university degrees

-The Aga Khan Education Services operates more than 200 schools and advanced educational programmes ranging from pre-kindergarten to Grade 12 in Africa, Asia and the Middle East

AKFED     Aga Khan Fund for Economic Development
-AKFED has helped address bandwidth problems in Africa through investments in SEACOM, the first company to connect South and East Africa to Europe and South Asia with 17,000 km of undersea fibre optic cables.

-Each year, in collaboration with its partners, the AKDN generates electricity for 10 million people who were previously without reliable energy supplies

-In Uganda, the Bujagali Hydropower Project provides clean and reliable power that supplies nearly half (49%) of the electricity in the country, helping to drive economic growth.
 
AKHS     Aga Khan Health Services
-In Tanzania, the expansion of AKDN’s East Africa Integrated Health System includes an investment of $83 million, to establish a network of 35 outreach health centres and an expansion of the Aga Khan Hospital.

-Each year, in collaboration with its partners, the AKDN provides 5 million people with quality health care, through outpatient visits and community health programmes

-In Uganda, the expansion of AKDN’s East Africa Integrated Health System includes a $100 million investment in a new hospital in Kampala

AKTC     Aga Khan Trust for Culture
-Many projects of the Aga Khan Trust for Culture have received heritage restoration awards, including 13 UNESCO awards for excellence in the rehabilitation of heritage.

-The Aga Khan garden in Edmonton, Alberta, contains more than 25,000 trees, shrubs, perennials, annuals and wetland plants.

-Over 9,000 building projects have been documented and are now available on archnet.org.  They range from rural schools to urban water towers, from state-of-the-art skyscrapers to modest mud-brick structures

AKU     Aga Khan University
-The Aga Khan University is building a new major campus in Arusha, Tanzania. This investment of over $1.5 billion in tertiary education is the largest in the East African region’s history.

-91.9 Million is The amount secured by the Aga Khan University for campus expansions and new buildings in 2013–2014 (USD)

-The AKDN operates one of the largest non-profit, private healthcare systems in the developing world. It consists of 200+ health centres (basic and comprehensive) and hospitals, including 14 ISO-certified and/or JCI-accredited hospitals.

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What? Is this what you were going to bring as an argument? ^^ Other than a couple of projects all of them are businesses started for the purpose of generating profit. How does that fit under the biggest service of Ummah?? 

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10 hours ago, Guest SomeRandomMuzzy said:

I further ask for forgiveness for my tone. It is frustrating to see Muslims tear each other down and i reacted poorly.

No,it's okay. Personally, I don't have anything against Aga Khan but I don't see him doing a great service to the Ummah. 

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15 minutes ago, starlight said:

What? Is this what you were going to bring as an argument? ^^ Other than a couple of projects all of them are businesses started for the purpose of generating profit. How does that fit under the biggest service of Ummah?? 

These are the things I bring to the argument and I feel they stand. You say business as if there is another way to create revenue to help the Ummah. Should we wait on the kindness of other Muslims? If so, I am afraid we would all starve and suffer. Like we do today.

Instead of these ridiculous standards everyone has of their perfect of perfects, I think more based in reality thought is needed.

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1 minute ago, Guest SomeRandomMuzzy said:

You say business as if there is another way to create revenue to help the Ummah.

If starting profitable businesses is service to Ummah then Mashallah Warren Buffet and Jeff Bezos are doing even more for the Ummah than Aga Khan. 

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14 minutes ago, starlight said:

No,it's okay. Personally, I don't have anything against Aga Khan but I don't see him doing a great service to the Ummah. 

Thank you for your understanding and I can understand your perspective a bit, but the facts can't be denied, whether a business or not, is there anyone around that is trying to do more? Or should we just continue to tear each other down and create further division?

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10 hours ago, Guest SomeRandomMuzzy said:

These are the things I bring to the argument and I feel they stand. You say business as if there is another way to create revenue to help the Ummah. Should we wait on the kindness of other Muslims? If so, I am afraid we would all starve and suffer. Like we do today.

Instead of these ridiculous standards everyone has of their perfect of perfects, I think more based in reality thought is needed

Well, first, if this was someone other than an Imam I might agree that the standards we are expecting are too high. But this is an Imam (at least as they say). Their conception of Imamah is also willing to drink the Kool-Aid and commit itself to what can be described as a "high Imamology" while this may still be reasonable seen as a debatable issue among the Shias. Photos like that are pretty damning, it's not an instance of Muhammad al-Baqir wearing fine textiles externally but keeping a woolen shirt underneath but we see that his private life is what we'd expect from any other obscenely rich man, not (as they would say) the same soul as the Prophet and Imam Ali (referring to concepts found in the speeches of the third Agha Khan and discussed by Nizari-Agha Khani catechesists like on Ismaili Gnosis). We're getting something on par with Leonardo DiCaprio, not Ali ibn Abi Talib (عليه السلام). The Agha Khan is an obscenely rich man, I imagine in no small part due to the fact that khums money isn't skimmed off of and there aren't institutions like the hawza which are supported by it (which end up becoming, in places like Iraq or Iran, the only opportunity for some people to recieve any education -- this isn't a good thing). I myself can say I've at least benefited in some capacity from his institutions. I've been to his museum before, which has free entry (although I must saw it is thoroughly unremarkable, but then there are no great museums in all of Canada). I've also benefited from books published by his Ismailis Studies Institution. But if, as an obscenely rich man, he has charitable foundations established (like the ones you quoted, or other institutions, like the ones I mentioned), I don't see it as out of character. The aforementioned Leonardo DiCaprio has done a lot to raise awareness of climate change. Middle Eastern monarchs have endowed chairs of Islamic studies at universities. The Zionists in my city have an annual grant of five-hundred dollars given to a student at my university who excels in Jewish studies courses. None of the above is absolved for anything because they act philanthropically as we might except people obscenely rich to. That being said, you've struck a cord of truth, who do we look at otherwise to do these things? If it were truly an instance of, as Sa'adi had mentioned in his Gulistan, of us not meant to judge the dervish out of cynicism perhaps you might be justified in your objection (forgetting that his father was a playboy and that's the reason he wasn't the fourth Agha Khan, and that this Agha Khan claims a title we believe rightly belongs to another) but I don't think Sa'adi imagined his dervish would do all of that which our obscenely rich brown guy has been photographed doing. Go figure.

 

As a side note, of all the branches of Muslims, while I find people like Khalil Andani (behind Ismaili Gnosis) really interesting to read, Agha Khanism has to really be the biggest joke. In the 11th century al-Mu'ayyid fi 'l-Din-e Shirazi had written about how the twelver branch of tashayyu' could never be the divinely guided one, seeing as it has an Imam Gha'ib and an Imam Dhahir is necessary for preserving the shari'ah. A century later their Imam declared a qiyama batini and the supersession of shari'ah and now they beg their followers not to drink wine as a matter of istihbab while the huge number of religious of the twelvers are still observing shari'ah and not needing to beg anyone something like that. God surely has a sense of humor. 

Edited by Ibn Al-Ja'abi
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Assalamu Aleikoum,

Aga Khan IV and Agakhanis in general are former Hashasheen sect, which Hassan II (their 23rd imam and one of the Alamut castle rulers) changed that religion when abandoned prayer. They are not Muslims and even not Isma'ilis, as there exist Isma'ili sects which are much closer to Islam than this sect or cult.

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