Jump to content
Guests can now reply in ALL forum topics (No registration required!) ×
Guests can now reply in ALL forum topics (No registration required!)
In the Name of God بسم الله

Recommended Posts

  • Veteran Member

As this 2007 article l found is more medical than an evolution subject; and not finding a thread or a post to attach it to, l am putting it in a new thread.

https://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/6724369.stm

The Wellcome Trust analysed the genes of 17,000 people to find genetic differences finding genetic variations associated with diseases.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Advanced Member
6 hours ago, hasanhh said:

As this 2007 article l found is more medical than an evolution subject; and not finding a thread or a post to attach it to, l am putting it in a new thread.

https://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/6724369.stm

The Wellcome Trust analysed the genes of 17,000 people to find genetic differences finding genetic variations associated with diseases.

Step one of designer babies is complete.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Veteran Member
9 hours ago, iCenozoic said:

designer babies

l read years ago that many genetic diseases are vanishing in the West because to CRISPR cut-out and substitution.

Example, l read that it takes 3 or more genes to result in breast cancer. So by cutting out 2 or more of the 4(+?) genes tied to breast cancer the probability of a girl later developing this cancer is virtually eliminated.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Advanced Member
8 minutes ago, hasanhh said:

l read years ago that many genetic diseases are vanishing in the West because to CRISPR cut-out and substitution.

Example, l read that it takes 3 or more genes to result in breast cancer. So by cutting out 2 or more of the 4(+?) genes tied to breast cancer the probability of a girl later developing this cancer is virtually eliminated.

Oh yea. Well that's exactly it. There are a few diseases that, within the next 5-10 years or so are anticipated to be more or less eliminated through removal of those genes, or rather replacement with genes that aren't compromised.

I think MS is one of them as well. And I imagine as time goes on, the list will only grow.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Advanced Member
Posted (edited)
5 minutes ago, Sirius_Bright said:

Cutting out couple of gene helps in eliminating a potential disease. Does manipulating genes at such micro level introduce some other risks or deficiency? 

Well, typically, from my understanding it isn't just the removal of a gene. If genes were simply removed, it would likely cause issues. But I believe part of the procedure is to also replace those removed genes with genes of say...a healthy individual that doesn't suffer from the complication. Kind of like in-vitro related practices.

And...I don't get the impression that it is particularly dangerous either. In most cases it would be conducted, I believe at the stage of an embryo, before that gene replicates n such. And it's done using proteins, I believe that grab on and manipulate specific segments of DNA. 

Scientists apparently have been doing these experiments for decades now on animals.

It truly was only a matter of time before it came to people. And even further, I think this is just the beginning. Once we become comfortable ridding the world of diseases, then people are going to open up about how their military commandos are actually superhuman and have been for decades before anyone knew.

Edited by iCenozoic
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Advanced Member
Posted (edited)

And it's actually really interesting stuff. We can make flies grow legs out of their heads, we can make mice with fused tail vertebrae and make their ribs grow from their tail bones. It's pretty wild stuff but the manipulation of DNA I think is...it's becoming more and more "public". The ability to take genes out, move them around the genome, stick them back in, replace them etc.

We now have genetically engineered fish that glow in the dark. Has anyone else been to the local pet store and seen these? I have.

And if we can have glow in the dark fish, we can certainly cure some genetic diseases. It's just a matter of time. 

The human body really is like a model and it's DNA is like an instruction sheet. And we can now copy and paste those instructions in different orders, we can replace them, rewrite them etc. Theoretically, we could probably make 6 armed humans now, granted such a human may not be viable, but the possibilities are really...we can only really imagine what their fullest extents are.

The only true limitations are discussions related to morality and government policy.

Edited by iCenozoic
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Veteran Member
41 minutes ago, iCenozoic said:

then people are going to open up about how their military commandos are actually superhuman and have been for decades before anyone knew.

1] commandos --- "superhuman" --> :hahaha:   They are still a 1 Watt lightbulb in the infrared, equipment detectable by ground-control (airport) radar and other bands.  So which do you think these superhuman-commandos will prefer: airstrike, artillery strike or heavy-weapon sniper fire?

2] "superhuman" in general: well how performance enhanced do they have to be before they can outrun a short-legged dog?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Advanced Member
Posted (edited)

Isn’t cloning and/or gene editing referred to in the Qur’ān? (That is, the cutting or splitting of cattle’s ears for genetic manipulation...à la Dolly the sheep...)

Edited by Northwest
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
  • Forum Administrators

Cancer is the biggest problem. There is good news on tumor shrinkage. The fasting-mimicking diet (FMD) used in a breast cancer study was a plant-based, low amino-acid substitution diet, consisting of soups, broths, liquids and tea. It was found that not only FMD reduced the size of tumors before chemotherapy was started but FMD protected the healthy cells of the body from the chemotherapy. 

Fasting-Mimicking Diet Shown to Be ‘Safe and Effective Supplement’ to Chemotherapy in Breast Cancer Patients

Quote

Fasting and cancer

Cancer cells thrive on carbohydrates—and meat, particularly red meat, is rich in amino acids that increase the expression of insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1), one of the body’s primary growth-hormone signals for muscle and tissue growth.

An individual with cancerous or precancerous cells who eats a diet containing a large amount of meat without incorporating an exercise regimen involving sufficient hormetic stress (i.e. the breakdown of muscle fibers) is theoretically at risk of providing IGF-1 to precancerous cells, allowing them to live past normal cell-cycle checkpoints and possibly become malignant.

https://www.goodnewsnetwork.org/fasting-mimicking-diet-effective-supplement-to-chemotherapy/

Fasting mimicking diet as an adjunct to neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer in the multicentre randomized phase 2 DIRECT trial

Quote

Short-term fasting protects tumor-bearing mice against the toxic effects of chemotherapy while enhancing therapeutic efficacy.

We randomized 131 patients with HER2-negative stage II/III breast cancer, without diabetes and a BMI over 18 kg m−2, to receive either a fasting mimicking diet (FMD) or their regular diet for 3 days prior to and during neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Here we show that there was no difference in toxicity between both groups, despite the fact that dexamethasone was omitted in the FMD group. A radiologically complete or partial response occurs more often in patients using the FMD (OR 3.168, P = 0.039). Moreover, per-protocol analysis reveals that the Miller&Payne 4/5 pathological response, indicating 90–100% tumor-cell loss, is more likely to occur in patients using the FMD (OR 4.109, P = 0.016). Also, the FMD significantly curtails chemotherapy-induced DNA damage in T-lymphocytes. These positive findings encourage further exploration of the benefits of fasting/FMD in cancer therapy. Trial number: NCT02126449.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-020-16138-3

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02126449

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...
  • 1 month later...

Join the conversation

You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...