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In the Name of God بسم الله
Qa'im

The Muhammadan Cure: The Modern Science of Prophetic Medicine

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55 minutes ago, abuzahra said:

Looks interesting. Could you kindly share the TOC and/or Bibliography? 

Thanks.

If you go to the Amazon link and click the see inside option, you can see the contents and the introduction.

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4 minutes ago, MuhammadFreeman said:

Salam

Good book, but I'm worried about the word "Muhammadan", as it has been used by crusaders with minimal understanding of Islam, much like the word "Moslem"

Ws, I understand your concern. “Muhammadi” is a term sometimes used in the Islamic context (such as Salman al-Muhammadi), and for the title, I considered “al-Shifa’ al-Muhammadi” to be like a synonym to the standard “Tib al-Nabawi”.

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Masha’Allah

May Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) bless you with wisdom to continue writing books and spreading the message of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام).

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سلام brother @Qa'im

Could you tell us what methodology you used to select narrations for this book? Did you select only narrations with acceptable isnad, or did you include weak isnad, too? 

Thank you!

Edited by SoRoUsH

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4 hours ago, SoRoUsH said:

Could you elaborate, what kinds of bread and rice are recommended? Any indication on whether they should be white or brown? 

The Prophet would eat barley bread; but there are also indications that barley was eaten out of poverty rather than preference. As for rice, bulgur is preferred. White rice is more processed, and usually not as healthy as brown.

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18 hours ago, Qa'im said:

The Prophet would eat barley bread; but there are also indications that barley was eaten out of poverty rather than preference. As for rice, bulgur is preferred. White rice is more processed, and usually not as healthy as brown.

Alright. I just ordered some bulgur from Amazon. going to try to make a Harrisa dish. Any recipes that would resemble the type of Harrisa that the Prophet ((صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم)) would eat?

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I find the following narration very interesting! 

وقال صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم : كل الباذنجان واكثر فانها شجرة رأيتها في الجنة . فمن اكلها على انها داء كانت داءاً ، ومن اكلها على انها دواء كانت دواءاً .  

The Prophet ﷺ said, “Eat eggplant often, for it is a plant that I saw in Paradise. So, one who eats it thinking that it is a malady, then it is a malady; and one who eats it thinking that it is a remedy, then it is a remedy.

This narration implies that our thinking/opinion about some food, changes the effect of the food on us. In other words, the food itself isn't objectively good or bad. It's our thought of it that makes it good or bad for us. 

What this may mean is that our thoughts either change the state of a food or they change the state of our body, which takes in the food. If we're mentally worried about a food, then that would physically change the ingestion and digestion aspects of the food, or the very nature of the food.

I also find the usage of "so" very interesting. The malleability of the food seems to be associated with its presence in paradise. 

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On 4/16/2020 at 9:52 AM, SoRoUsH said:

I find the following narration very interesting! 

وقال صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم : كل الباذنجان واكثر فانها شجرة رأيتها في الجنة . فمن اكلها على انها داء كانت داءاً ، ومن اكلها على انها دواء كانت دواءاً .  

The Prophet ﷺ said, “Eat eggplant often, for it is a plant that I saw in Paradise. So, one who eats it thinking that it is a malady, then it is a malady; and one who eats it thinking that it is a remedy, then it is a remedy.

This narration implies that our thinking/opinion about some food, changes the effect of the food on us. In other words, the food itself isn't objectively good or bad. It's our thought of it that makes it good or bad for us. 

Hmm.. interestingly I know someone who loves eggplant but is severely allergic to them. I also know another sis who absolutely loves and craves honey but is unable to keep it in her body for more than a few seconds and throws up severely. She is particularly interested in eating it because of its healing properties and being among the sunnahs but cannot.

Thoughts?

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According to this report, eggplant is a fruit of Paradise that the Prophet may have seen during his ascension (miʿrāj). If it is paradisal, then it must in essence be good.

The narration appears to iterate the logic of placebo, as one who simply believes that the eggplant is harmful will be harmed, and one who simply believes that the eggplant is beneficial will find benefit. A common theory is that one’s expectation can cause one’s body to produce effects similar to what a medication might have caused, positive or negative.[1] The stronger the expectation, the stronger the effect. This shows the significance of one’s mindset in healing – optimism has a biomedical function. In truth, healing is a very human experience, as humans are the only beings that are known to ingest a substance with the hope, faith, and knowledge that they will recover.

Eggplants are mostly beneficial to one’s health. The fibre, potassium, vitamins, antioxidants, anthocyanins and flavonoids can reduce the risk of heart disease, decrease levels of bad cholesterol, reduce the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, help prevent tumor growth, and help prevent age-related macular degeneration in the eyes.[2]


[2] Megan Ware, “Eggplant health benefits and tasty tips”, Medical News Today, https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/279359

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@Qa'im I’ve got both your books brother. I purchased the first one on kindle and the second one I’ve got on kindle unlimited in the UK. 

I’m making my way through the first one. MashAllah very good so far. 

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On 4/3/2020 at 7:18 PM, Qa'im said:

Thank you brother. Inshallah it will be out on kindle in the next day or two.

salaam brother,

I am trying to quit severe addiction to marijuana, can you help?

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On 4/16/2020 at 1:09 PM, habib e najjaar said:

I also know another sis who absolutely loves and craves honey but is unable to keep it in her body for more than a few seconds and throws up severely. She is particularly interested in eating it because of its healing properties and being among the sunnahs but cannot.

If she is eating it on a piece of bread or by a spoon, it might be her gagging reflex to the thickness of the honey. Has she stirred the honey in  tea or water?

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