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8 hours ago, ali_fatheroforphans said:

I can speak Urdu and English. I'm currently learning Farsi and I've made a lot of progress.

How are you learning Farsi? 

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56 minutes ago, Moalfas said:

How are you learning Farsi? 

I'm using multiple resources. I have a Dropbox with all the Farsi books you could ever think of (probs even the ones you'd have to pay for). If you want, I can send you the torrent link? 

I'm also using pimsleur. It's actually such a good way to learn a language, because all you have to do is listen to audios which are 30 minutes long. The course is structured in a very smart way and it's a very active learning process where you repeat what the native speaker says. The problem with traditional textbooks is that we get obsessed about grammar rules etc. And it's very forced. There are different levels for the Pimselur course.

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Far from perfectly:

English, German, Swedish, French, Arabic

I'd like to continue my Chinese studies and also learn Italian because I like the way it sounds ..

My grandfather spoke and could translate between 12 languages, so I'm a loser compared to him.

I also want to learn Farsi 

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On 10/31/2019 at 1:10 PM, AmirioTheMuzzy said:

Yes

Many years ago, I couldn't handle Montreal Québécois so I moved to Toronto lol 

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6 hours ago, ali_fatheroforphans said:

I'm still creating the Dropbox. It's taking time because I have to upload all the pdfs and audios on  dropbox. Will have it done soon inshallah.

May Allah include this in your book of amaal. I’ve been wanting to speak Farsi I can understand a little bit but I want to learn it and master it.

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On 10/31/2019 at 11:28 AM, ali_fatheroforphans said:

I can speak Urdu and English. I'm currently learning Farsi and I've made a lot of progress. You learn so much about different cultures by learning their language. It makes you more accepting and open-minded. Like I respect Persians more since I started learning Farsi and  I find their culture beautiful.

I also plan to learn Arabic in the future inshallah.

How are you learning it? 

Is there a course you’re using?

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3 hours ago, 313 Seeker said:

Well I don't know to be honest. Don't know much about them, except how to say totonka from dances with wolves. Supposedly means buffalo or bison of something.

That would be Lakota, a dialect of the Sioux language, itself belonging to the larger Siouan language family.

https://fr.wiktionary.org/wiki/tȟatȟáŋka

Its entry in Wiktionary.

Unfortunately generally with Native American languages generally materials tend to be scarce outside courses at colleges and materials prepared to teach second language speakers. There's a channel on YouTube that has recordings of quite a few Native American languages among hundreds of other languages, modern and ancient.

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2 hours ago, SeekingHeaven said:

How are you learning it? 

Is there a course you’re using?

I started off by using the "learn Farsi in 100 days"  book by Reza Nazari. It's very good because the lessons are well-structured and they focus on all three aspects of learning - reading, writing and speaking (conversational Persian). The book is accompanied with a series of online lessons by the author. I've finished around 20 lessons but then decided to move on a new course which I'm loving.

Pimselur Persian course is perfect if you want to learn actively. A lot of the books out there are great but you require a lot of patience. The unique thing about this course is that you subconsciously learn all the grammar rules. You practice speaking so much that you start to guess the words and make sense out of the sentences. I can speak from experience that this course is just amazing. It's a series of 30 minute audio recordings and you can listen to them wherever you are. It costs quite a bit but I'll download the audio and send it to you if you're interested? :D 

Also I've watched a lot of Persian dramas. It's very helpful.

Edited by ali_fatheroforphans
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What I've found interesting amongst Shias worldwide is a keen interest to learn Farsi over Arabic.

What would you guys suggest the reasons could be? 

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On 11/2/2019 at 6:39 AM, Moalfas said:

What I've found interesting amongst Shias worldwide is a keen interest to learn Farsi over Arabic.

What would you guys suggest the reasons could be? 

I don’t think it is an interest. The hawzahs most Shias attend/can attend are in Iran/run by/linked to Iran. Whatever is more easily available becomes more popular. In my area, the ONLY Arabic learning institutions are run by wahhabis, and they have produced droves of Arabic speakers who also happen to become wahhabi/wahhabi leaning by the time they are done. I have tried attending some wahhabi madrassahs for tahfeedh and Arabic since no Shia or neutral ones were available but then had to quit.

This also means a majority of the muammams/turbans/alims produced by the iranian hawzas are very basic at Arabic. The saddest part is that in hawzahs, the language of instruction is persian as opposed to Arabic.

Further, a large number of desi Shias are Urdu speaking, which is very similar to Farsi so they automatically are more likely to learn Farsi than Arabic with ease.

3. Farsi has no mudhakkar and muannath rules and thus very easy to learn compared to Arabic.

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16 hours ago, Ibn Al-Ja'abi said:

That would be Lakota, a dialect of the Sioux language, itself belonging to the larger Siouan language family.

https://fr.wiktionary.org/wiki/tȟatȟáŋka

Its entry in Wiktionary.

Unfortunately generally with Native American languages generally materials tend to be scarce outside courses at colleges and materials prepared to teach second language speakers. There's a channel on YouTube that has recordings of quite a few Native American languages among hundreds of other languages, modern and ancient.

Yes I dream of sitting in a teepee with a tribal elder smoking a peace pipe, and practicing my native American this way. Although there are probably so many different tribes and languages that my lungs wouldn't have time to recover from all that peace smoking. I'd also like to go to some totally isolated tribes in the Amazon forest (at least wearing some kilt or something) and learn from them too.

But thanks for the info. Hopefully I meet some real native American soon to get the chance. God bless

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On 10/31/2019 at 11:28 AM, ali_fatheroforphans said:

I can speak Urdu and English. I'm currently learning Farsi and I've made a lot of progress. You learn so much about different cultures by learning their language. It makes you more accepting and open-minded. Like I respect Persians more since I started learning Farsi and  I find their culture beautiful.

I also plan to learn Arabic in the future inshallah.

Salam brother can you share with me the Farsi dropbox you have? I can’t pm you because my account is low ranked.

Thank you and jazak Allah

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On November 1, 2019 at 5:39 PM, 313 Seeker said:

Well I don't know to be honest. Don't know much about them, except how to say totonka from dances with wolves. Supposedly means buffalo or bison of something.

Hayaku, kiyachanyitik.

U'wu' me' apit.

Kaya scolayit.

:bye:

 

And I speak English, some French and Spanish. Forgot a lot of the Hebrew and Greek. Sucked at Latin. Know a few words  in lots of different languages, like most people. Picking up a little Arabic ... I apparently have to these days because my opposite number in grandmahood sometimes forgets to speak English to me.

(Tribal  language currently unclassified. Apparently unique. Chichoya!)

Edited by LeftCoastMom
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