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In the Name of God بسم الله
hasanhh

Lebanon Protests 2019

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From my reading, over the weekend 1/4th of Lebanon's population protested the gov't and the Chr!stians quit the gov't.

l'm surprise this has not been made a topic before.

What info and opinions do y'all have?

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Salam

Around 2 months ago, an Iraqi figure said that Saudi had a plan to make protests in Iraq, Lebanon and another country I don't remember...and he was so sure that he said people can write down his words and see if this happens after one month or no. And it happened and it did happen exactly as he predicted...he had said that these protests would start by some social media activities first and then some clashes in the streets. Just when Iraq was struggling with protests, Lebanon also had some, but no one paid attention since it wasn't serious then.

Now after a month these protests have gained momentum ...and who knows...maybe foreign players are now having more time since Iraq is a bit settled? or at least the plan is at the motion there and doesn't need further focus. 

The most interesting fact is, that the prime minister of Lebanon himself agrees with protesters ... and I wonder who else is responsible in a country for current affairs other than the Prime minister and his government ... so strange ( in a way, he reminds me of Ruhani, Iranian President) 

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Lebanon's protests started last week in central Beirut and have very quickly spread all over the country. Other than on the first night in Beirut where law enforcement were slightly heavy handed in dispersing the crowds around government buildings, the protests have generally been peaceful. In fact, they've had a party like atmosphere where people on the streets were singing and dancing. A very different feel from Iraq's protests.

An interesting point is that both Lebanon and Iraq share confessional political systems which were a direct result of foreign interference. Both have corrupt and weak governments that are highly influenced by world powers. Other than lack of jobs, opportunities and high levels of corruption; the Lebanese protests have a distinct issue that relates to Lebanon's Banks which hold a lot of power and influence.

The Government realised the danger it faced and offered a number of concessions/changes which did not help quell the frustration.

These protests, albeit highly supported by a majority of the population, do put Lebanon in a more precarious state.

Iraqis will also be going out on the streets again this week 25th Oct after (the Arbaeen pause) and let's pray things can stay peaceful in both Lebanon and Iraq.

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A correction: Christians didn't leave the government, a Christian political party, LF, left the government.

The protesters are calling on taking down the government, but have to solution/visible goal after that like who will lead, how government should be setup, etc.

The protests started out great but now it's essentially just a bunch of parties across the country. The party that left government are trying to make it as if they themselves are with the people, so they're kind of ruining the protests too. Not to mention little to no one in the protests are mentioning Samir Ja3ja3 or Sami Gemayel, but are caught up in mentioning the other parties.

Also thugs carrying Amal flags attacking the protesters. 

Tldr; Protests started out great, and they were calling for the fall of the government, but have turned pro LF and pro Kataeb, which is dangerous. Thugs have also attacked protesters.

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7 hours ago, Moalfas said:

Lebanon's protests started last week in central Beirut and have very quickly spread all over the country. Other than on the first night in Beirut where law enforcement were slightly heavy handed in dispersing the crowds around government buildings, the protests have generally been peaceful. In fact, they've had a party like atmosphere where people on the streets were singing and dancing. A very different feel from Iraq's protests.

An interesting point is that both Lebanon and Iraq share confessional political systems which were a direct result of foreign interference. Both have corrupt and weak governments that are highly influenced by world powers. Other than lack of jobs, opportunities and high levels of corruption; the Lebanese protests have a distinct issue that relates to Lebanon's Banks which hold a lot of power and influence.

The Government realised the danger it faced and offered a number of concessions/changes which did not help quell the frustration.

These protests, albeit highly supported by a majority of the population, do put Lebanon in a more precarious state.

Iraqis will also be going out on the streets again this week 25th Oct after (the Arbaeen pause) and let's pray things can stay peaceful in both Lebanon and Iraq.

Very sad for Lebanon the protests are mainly secular and many cases are “Shias” posting photos of their partners who are Christian or Druze to show their unity 

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People seem to be tired of having their sectarian identities take precedence over anything else. The sectarianism in the ME is tearing the region apart, literally, it is time to embrace leadership that unites nations and is a leader for all people living within those nations. The protests are an indication of how the statusquo is not working. You'll see the same happen in Eastern Saudi Arabia and Bahrain at some point, and possibly even in Syria again eventually, the corruption and sectarian based politics isn't sustainable. 

It's amazing to see many of these people have the courage to be protesting despite a high risk of being killed or injured (especially in Iraq). There seems to be anger that is not just in the ME, but also in South America, there have been massive protests in Chile and Ecuador as well. People want leaders that will serve them not themselves. We don't have that, if we do in some places like the Scandinavian countries, Switzerland etc. they are few and far between. In my own home country, the government intimidates people into not protesting and charges people with charges like sedition or sowing discord if they expose something about them they don't like. The audacity of these leaders to think they have any authority over you just because they hold a certain post is remarkable. People should rule their leaders, after all they pay their salaries not the other way around.

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On 10/23/2019 at 5:59 PM, Enlightened Follower said:

Very sad for Lebanon the protests are mainly secular and many cases are “Shias” posting photos of their partners who are Christian or Druze to show their unity 

There's actually a minorty of Shia also protesting, however the majority of them are holding back. 

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4 hours ago, Diaz said:

Why Sayyid Hassan ordered people not to protest? Do anyone know why?

In his very recent address, a few hours ago, he said that brining down the government was not acceptable and that the protests lacked clear leadership and he's worried about outside influence to destabilise Lebanon and turn it back to civil war. 

He is calling on his followers to stay away from the protests because of that. 

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49 minutes ago, Mohamed1993 said:

People seem to be tired of having their sectarian identities take precedence over anything else. The sectarianism in the ME is tearing the region apart, literally, it is time to embrace leadership that unites nations and is a leader for all people living within those nations. The protests are an indication of how the statusquo is not working. You'll see the same happen in Eastern Saudi Arabia and Bahrain at some point, and possibly even in Syria again eventually, the corruption and sectarian based politics isn't sustainable. 

It's amazing to see many of these people have the courage to be protesting despite a high risk of being killed or injured (especially in Iraq). There seems to be anger that is not just in the ME, but also in South America, there have been massive protests in Chile and Ecuador as well. People want leaders that will serve them not themselves. We don't have that, if we do in some places like the Scandinavian countries, Switzerland etc. they are few and far between. In my own home country, the government intimidates people into not protesting and charges people with charges like sedition or sowing discord if they expose something about them they don't like. The audacity of these leaders to think they have any authority over you just because they hold a certain post is remarkable. People should rule their leaders, after all they pay their salaries not the other way around.

Lebanon and Iraq's confessional political systems enshrine sectarianism and have no doubt been applied in those jurisdictions for that specific goal. The situation in both counties is dangerously worrying. 

There's already reports of new fatalities in Iraq's protests that started today and Lebanon could very easily slip into such chaos. 

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Also Lebanese people are very sectarian if an Iraqi, Kurdish or Persian talks about their politics they’ll go insane. I’ve tried discussing with several Lebanese political commentators and they blocked me, the chickens are coming home to roost and the Christians are turning on the Shias and Hezbollah.

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2 hours ago, Diaz said:

Inshallah nothing happens, but I feel there will be civil war. :(

Maybe in a partial sense, maybe not the same as in the 1970s. l anticipate that the major difference is when France lands more people and move across the chr!stioan northern area into Syria.

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8 hours ago, hasanhh said:

Maybe in a partial sense, maybe not the same as in the 1970s. l anticipate that the major difference is when France lands more people and move across the chr!stioan northern area into Syria.

In Martyr’s Square in front of a mosque there belly dancers!

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18 hours ago, Diaz said:

Why Sayyid Hassan ordered people not to protest? Do anyone know why?

Salam he knows that triangle of Israel-America & KSA are behind this to make it as war between Lebanese & Iraq against Iran but he said if demonstrators reach to good achievement he & Hizbullah will support them also same procedure is happening in in Pakistan & India & Bangladesh that behind of all them I see Facebook with it's services beside BBC are spreading this demonstration to make a total war between Shias - Sunnis & Muslims -Hindus . 

 

Edited by Ashvazdanghe

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12 hours ago, 2Timeless said:

The difference between Iraqi and Lebanese protests is honestly shocking.  One contains DJs and belly dancers and people complaining over botox and the other has people dying.

As different as they currently are, they are both prone to devastating consequences. Iraq has had several dozen fatalities and thousands of injuries in a single day. Part of the reason is, it's Shia protesters vs 'Shia' Law enforcement and militias. 

Lebanon on the other hand would be different denominations pitted against one another and would therefore cause much more of a spark in an already charged climate. 

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3 hours ago, Ashvazdanghe said:

Salam he knows that triangle of Israel-America & KSA are behind this to make it as war between Lebanese & Iraq against Iran

It's easy to brush everything with the conspiracy brush. The fact remains that had there not been this level of corruption and despair, people wouldn't feel the need to protest or (party)

There's no doubt that several powers have and will jump on the bandwagon to turn the frustration into conflict and that's expected in nations that are controlled and highly influenced by foreign powers I.e. Lebanon and Iraq. 

Iranian vs anti-Iranian influence. 

 

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8 minutes ago, Ibn Al-Shahid said:

I’ve received many videos from family members; the revolution is partying hard everyday

I pray that it stays a party. 

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long live happy protests! 

 

 

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:salam:

Families now divided about the Revolution, quite funny. 

Scary at the same time. 

People do not realize what awaits them, they have been witnessing the Sayed's truthfulness for years but now, for some reason they feel his words have no meaning nor importance.

 

 

 

 

 

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7 hours ago, Moalfas said:

Long live happy protests! 

l had to youtube it. The lyrics are not too difficult to remember.  :grin:

I think the key are the two lines:

"Let's go hunt" 

and

"Run away"

Directed towards the gov't.

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l was reading a 2007 paper this A.M.

To wit: the 1989 Taif Accord modified the 1943 Nat'l Pact and gave more power to the Primeirship (Sunni reserved) than the Speakership (Shi'a reserved) and diminsihed the Presidency (Christian reserved.)in a country with 18 'recognized' religions. This and the then influx of Syrian laborers essentially weaken the Lebanonese state although it did bring a more peaceful situation.

Now, as forecasted in this paper, anti-corruption has become a political force.

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8 hours ago, realizm said:

 

Scary at the same time. 

 

It's certainly scary times. It's in fact more worrying than the days when Daesh ran amok. Back then, everyone was united against a known threat. Now, people have reached such levels of despair that they're willing to ignore the threats all around for the sake of their voices being heard. And the ones already connected and benefitting will do everything they can to keep the status quo. 

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2 minutes ago, Mohammadi_follower said:

In Iraq maybe because I see many people dying but in Lebanon I don’t think so to be honnest dear brother.

True, but some people are doing fitnah, that’s why I was little bit worried.

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8 minutes ago, Diaz said:

True, but some people are doing fitnah, that’s why I was little bit worried.

I know there are many problems in Lebanon and to be honnest I understand perfectly that there are protests for asking better life. However by seeing some people in social media it looks like some people go protest just "for fun" or "for following the crowd". Of course not most of them but I had this feeling by watching some people in social medias.

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1 hour ago, Mohammadi_follower said:

I know there are many problems in Lebanon and to be honnest I understand perfectly that there are protests for asking better life. However by seeing some people in social media it looks like some people go protest just "for fun" or "for following the crowd". Of course not most of them but I had this feeling by watching some people in social medias.

True, astaghfirullah, I’ve seen some videos and pictures as well, some people are doing something disgusting on the streets.

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Hariri's resignation today puts Lebanon in more precarious situation. There's also suggestion that should the situation continue, it could lead to the collapse of the Lebanese economy. 

Hizbullah would be the biggest political loser should the government come down as they had the biggest wins in the last elections. 

Supporters of the protests call it a 'revolution'

The ones against it call the protestors 'a bunch of thugs blocking the roads' 

Things are not looking good..

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3 hours ago, Mohammadi_follower said:

Yeah, I saw this one. Someone insulted Sayid Hassan and Nabih Berri, majority of followers kept quite, but then someone insulted Imam Hussein (عليه السلام), Hezbollah and Amal movement supporters got angry and then they attacked most of the protestors. 
 

I am 100% sure the protestors want Sayid Hassan to quit from politicians, these people are becoming more crazier than before. If Hezbollah is not in Lebanon, there is noting called called. 
 

4 hours ago, Mohammadi_follower said:

Is it possible that the actual form of government we have in Lebanon (confessional government) could collapsed for becoming a secular state ?

Maybe? I’m not sure, what do you think?

 

4 hours ago, Moalfas said:

Hariri's resignation today puts Lebanon in more precarious situation. There's also suggestion that should the situation continue, it could lead to the collapse of the Lebanese economy. 

Hizbullah would be the biggest political loser should the government come down as they had the biggest wins in the last elections. 

Supporters of the protests call it a 'revolution'

The ones against it call the protestors 'a bunch of thugs blocking the roads' 

Things are not looking good..

Ofc he will resign, I got angry when people start saying he is the best because he cares about the protestors. They already forgot he payed $16 million for his girlfriend who is a bikini model xD 

 

yeah, I’m scared and worry as well. I hope nothing happens to the people who are against the protestors.

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