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In the Name of God بسم الله

China's ethnic cleansing of Muslim Uyghers

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17 hours ago, Diaz said:

Update, I’m sure some of you heard about the deadly virus that occurred in China. Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) is punishing them.

Really?

The corona-virus has already spread outside China with cases now known in Hong Kong, Thailand, Australia, Taiwan, Malaysia, Japan, France, Singapore, the United States, Macao, Vietnam, South Korea and Nepal. With its long incubation period and high communicability there is leaked footage of doctors in China estimating non-quarantined victims are infecting an average of 14 others before either dying or recovering (see BestGore.com). Without a doubt this virus will spread further and the countries most likely to have the greatest loss of life will be those that are the poorest and most backward, with the weakest central governments and the most primitive healthcare systems (I.e. Africa, South America and entire non-oil rich Muslim world).

Is Allah punishing China's treatment of its Muslim population by releasing a virus that could kill millions of people around the world that will most likely especially kill Muslims and poor people, or will the coming deaths just be the unfortunate "collateral damage" of Allah's righteous wrath towards Beijing?

You should really think before you type.

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@hasanhh it's ironic that DW cares about muslims maybe because it sees China a more great treat than Muslims but in other hand DW introduces Hizbullah as terrorist organization & shows Yemenis specially  Houthies in negative light because they are shia & have support of Iran but cries corodile tears for Uighurs althought  knew a group  of uighurs affected by wahabism of KSA & Turkification of Turkey which still many European countries see religious activities  of Turkey in Europe as a trouble  but they prefer any wahabi & new ottoman organization in Europe than presence  of any Shia organization.

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On 11/27/2019 at 12:45 AM, Sumerian said:

America oppresses more" so? Since when was it that Shi'as cared about who "oppresses more" when it comes to calling out and rejecting the dhalimeen? May Allah curse all oppressors. 

"America" isn't oppressing anyone, it's the permanent govt of the United States that's oppressing people. They are not America, I and others like me are the spirit of America-- the hope that eventually there will be peace in the world and we will beat our nukes into plowshares rather than continue to be controlled by absolute monsters who seek nothing but an increase of their power for its own sake.

People like me have absolutely no power or ability to resist these people because they'll just throw you into prison if you make too much noise and get too close to the truth about it; so don't blame "America" or "Americans"... blame the unelected, unaccountable people who have been in govt since the 1970s for oppression of Muslims around the world at the behest of :ranting: like Henry Kissinger and the corporate money that owns them. They nominate the presidential candidates and legislators from the "Two Main Parties©" and we get to "choose" between them but the big cruel joke is that THEY ARE ALL THE SAME. We saw a glimmer of hope in Donald Trump's takeover of the Republican party and thought that he might be able to bring our troops home from the stupid imperial wars that Dick Cheney has had going for about 20 years (and that every hand-wringing liberal's hero, Barack O-bomb-a(kid) has increased), but the situation looks more and more grim by the day.

We don't have any influence over these people or what they do across the globe. We protest them and they ignore it and continue on, and I'll keep stating that everyday working Americans aren't to blame every time this gets brought up because it needs to be said. We're sick of funding it out of every paycheck and every purchase. We don't want our neighbors, friends or family over in the Middle East.

We don't want them anywhere besides back home, defending the borders of this country from invading military forces like a proper military should be.

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Reported today, John Bolton's book, The Room Where lt Happened, says Trump supports the internment of Uighurs.

Example:  https://www.axios.com/trump-uighur-muslim-bolton-73ebf1e2-9d34-4aaf-a9ba-17340d2847e4.html

However, Trump signed the Uighur Human Rights Policy Act yesterday.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/andrewsolender/2020/06/17/trump-signs-bill-condemning-chinas-uighur-camps-shortly-after-bolton-book-claims-he-encouraged-them/#6b2d6c1931ed

Comment: the New York Times and the Washington Post both had editorial policies supporting the Act.

 

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1 hour ago, Ashvazdanghe said:

l have trouble with ABNA. Here is an alternative report:

 

https://www.theblaze.com/news/uyghur-chinese-muslim-concentration-camps-hair

 

 

Edited by hasanhh
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Xinhua news coming out with feel good stories about Xinjiang. Odd thing about this one is that there are lots of scenes of Xinjiang, but no mosques ...

 

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Anyone seen the PBS documentary on Muslim detention?

https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/china-undercover/

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Another one from Xinhua. This time a happy clappy one about a mosque ... but there are no worshippers ... at least the Imam is speaking his own language rather than Chinese.

 

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This is what complicates matters:

 

According to the FT.

1. Saudi does not want Pakistan to antagonise India, because it is scared of India

2. Because of the PK stance on Kashmir, Saudi is recalling its billion $ loans

3. China is stepping and and giving Pakistan the necessary cash.

https://www.ft.com/content/49d24c4b-345e-492b-8a8f-c1a550173ee1

 

Conundrum.

How much do you protest about the  12 million Uighurs when there are 100m Pakistanis and 70m Iranians dependent on China?

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On 8/14/2020 at 12:19 AM, Haji 2003 said:

Conundrum.

How much do you protest about the  12 million Uighurs when there are 100m Pakistanis and 70m Iranians dependent on China?

Ironically condemning China for "ethnic-cleansing-of-muslim-uyghers " has been vanished since outbreak of Coronavirus which Ukrain(Americ0-Russia war news has been last nail to it's coffin .

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'If China Is Anti-Islam, Why Are These Muslims Enjoying A Faith Revival' (Time Magazine) 

https://time.com/3099950/china-muslim-hui-xinjiang-uighur-islam/

The road to Linxia, in China’s vast, sere northwest, is known locally as the Quran Belt, with a profusion of newly built mosques and Sufi shrines lining the motorway. Some are built in a traditional Chinese style, with pagoda-like eaves; others, with their green tiled domes, echo Middle Eastern architecture.

With violent unrest affecting northwestern Xinjiang, a spotlight has been cast on that area’s Muslim Uighurs, who have long chafed at rule from Beijing. But the Uighurs, some of whom yearn for autonomy from the People’s Republic, are not the biggest Muslim population in China, which has more adherents to Islam than the European Union. That distinction belongs to the Hui, a 10.5 million-strong group that is also the second largest of China’s 55 officially recognized ethnic minorities. One of the Hui centers of Islamic learning is the Wild West town of Linxia, in Gansu province, where Sufi traditions remain vibrant.

With the bloodshed in Xinjiang escalating — the most recent clash late last month, which the Chinese government labeled a “violent terrorist attack,” saw nearly 100 people killed, according to an official count — authorities have intensified a crackdown on spiritual expression by Uighurs. (Tibetans face religious repression too as their disenchantment with Chinese rule grows.) But this does not mean that Beijing is curtailing Islam nationwide. Indeed, members of the Muslim Hui community are enjoying a flowering of faith in what is, officially, still an atheist communist nation.

Linxia’s Islamic places of worship are just one symbol of this religious boom. Ismail, a Hui who works for a state-owned enterprise in the Ningxia autonomous region, says he openly practices his faith. “Of course, I fast during Ramadan,” he says. “All my Hui friends do it, too. It’s our obligation as Muslims.” But a Uighur college student says he and his classmates were not allowed to do the same. “[Han university authorities] make sure we eat at the cafeteria. They say they don’t want us to be tired, but I don’t believe them. It is because we are Uighur.”

Hui participation in the hajj pilgrimage to Mecca has increased over the past several years, say scholars. Another sign of renewed religious commitment: Ismail says he has noticed more Hui women in his hometown wearing veils in recent years. “As more Hui women receive education, they learn more about their own identities,” he says. “As a result, they realize the protection brought by Islam and are starting to wear veils more.”

By contrast, a local paper in the Xinjiang town of Karamay reported last week that residents with long beards, headscarves, veils and clothing with an Islamic crescent moon and star would not be allowed to board public buses while the city played host to a sporting event. In Kashgar, a Silk Road outpost that is a repository of Uighur culture, the local government has promoted a campaign called Project Beauty that urges Uighur women to “show your pretty faces and let your beautiful hair fly in the wind.” Uighurs also have a hard time getting passports to travel abroad, especially to go on the hajj.

“It’s not an issue of freedom of religion,” says Dru Gladney, one of the foremost academics studying Chinese Muslims. “Clearly, there are many avenues of religious expression that are unfettered in China, but when you cross these very often nebulous and shifting boundaries of what the state regards as political, then you’re in dangerous territory. Obviously this is what we see in Xinjiang and in Tibet.”

Unlike Tibetans or Uighurs, who speak a Turkic language and are racially distinct from the Han, the Hui are not agitating for increased autonomy, much less a split from China. One reason may be influenced by geography. While Uighurs are concentrated in Xinjiang, and Tibetans clustered on the high plateau in far western China, the Hui are spread out across the nation. True, Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region is dedicated to them, but Hui communities exist in practically every major Chinese city. A significant population lives in Beijing.

Racially and linguistically, the Hui — whose ancestors include Persian, Central Asian and Arab traders who plied the Silk Road and intermarried with local Chinese — are virtually indistinguishable from China’s Han majority. Often, it is only the presence of a white prayer cap that differentiates a Hui man from his Han counterpart. Partly because of their cultural affinity to the Han and their geographic dispersal, the Hui are far more integrated into mainstream Chinese life than those ethnic minorities living in China’s borderlands.

 

“The way [the government treats] the Uighurs and the Hui is completely different,” says a foreign scholar who studies the Hui, requesting anonymity. “The standard line for the Uighurs is that everything is oppression and violence and conflict, and the standard narrative for the Hui is that they are complicit with state power and that they are not real Muslims. The Hui are considered the good Muslims and the Uighurs the bad Muslims.”

That division has implications for the future of Xinjiang, which was once predominantly Uighur but has played host to waves of government-encouraged internal migration. While many of the recent arrivals who work at military or state-owned farms and mines are Han, other newcomers are Hui. China’s 2010 national census recorded 983,015 Hui in Xinjiang, up from 681,527 in the 1990 count. During the 2009 rioting in Xinjiang’s capital Urumqi that killed around 200 people, one reported refrain from extremist Uighurs spread across social media: “Kill the Han, kill the Hui.”

The Hui’s forebears include a long line of military generals loyal to imperial Chinese governments. (There were, however, Hui rebels who battled the late Qing dynasty from a base in Ningxia.) The Hui also excelled at trading, a talent which spread their numbers across China. Even in Lhasa, the capital of Tibet, many trinket stores and restaurants near the main city square are now owned by Hui merchants. The Hui, along with the Han, were targeted when ethnic violence broke out in Tibetan regions in 2008. Indeed, ancient history in China’s far west is filled with battles between Tibetans, Uighurs, the Hui and the Han, with borders and allegiances shifting like desert sands. Animosities endure. “Post-2008 [violence in Tibet] and 2009 [bloodshed in Xinjiang], it’s like it’s every group for themselves,” says the foreign Hui scholar.

 

External influences are also becoming more important in Chinese Islam. The proliferation of Middle Eastern–style mosques in Linxia mirrors the rise of purist Salafi Islam across the world, from Indonesia to North Africa, in which a unified faith trumps indigenous variations. “In China, the Hui have extraordinarily illustrated this beautiful accommodation between Chinese culture and Islam,” says Gladney, who teaches at Pomona College in California. “But with the rise of social media and an idea of one Islamic world, this historic accommodation is being debated.”

Gladney notes that Hui clerics have studied at Egypt’s al-Azhar University, one of the world’s most important centers of Islamic learning, while around 300 Hui live in the holy Saudi Arabian city of Medina. “For 1,300 years, the Hui have been able to not only survive but thrive,” says Gladney. “But we have to also remember that revolutions in Chinese Islam have tended to come from increased communication and travel abroad, and we’re in a period where the Hui with the right connections are doing just that.”

— With reporting by Gu Yongqiang / Beijing

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The first Shia Islamic school in China

July 28, 2020 | 3:50 PM
China is the most populous country in the world, covering a large area of Central and East Asia, with a population of around 1.4 billion. Islam was first brought to China in 651 and then spread by thousands of Arabs and Iranians in this country. Muslims now make up one percent of China’s population that most of them are Sunni and Hanafi, but a number of Shia Muslims also live in the country. Following is a short interview with Hujattal-Islam Isa Chini, the Director of the Ahlal-Bayt ((عليه السلام)) Seminary in China’s Hainan Province, about the situation of Shia Muslims in the country.
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Is there any Shia seminary in China?

I started my relations with the seminary of Qom 20 years ago after finishing my studies in the field of religious sciences. These connections led to the establishment of the Ahlal-Bayt (عليه السلام) seminary in Hainan Province as the first Shia seminary to teach Islamic sciences in China. Many students are studying in this seminary that came to this school from different parts of China. Chinese students in the Ahlal-Bayt (عليه السلام) seminary learn the basic lessons for three to four years and, if necessary, go to the seminary to learn more religious sciences.

Where do Chinese Shia Muslims live in this country?

A 300-year-old Shia population lives in northwest China’s Xinjiang province. But we do not have a dense Shia population in other parts of China. Of course, groups of Shia Muslims live scattered in different parts of the country.

https://en.shafaqna.com/156763/the-first-shia-islamic-school-in-china/

Transnational Shi’ism in Southern China and the Party-state’s “Hawza” Diplomacy

A Shi’ite presence can be discerned for example among the foreign merchants and communities that settled in coastal Guangdong, Fujian and even Hainan from as early as the seventh century and all the way to the mid-thirteenth century at the height of the Pax-Mongolica.[2] In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, Sufi tariqas (orders), such as the Qadariyya and Kubrawiyya, succeeded in establishing footholds in Qinghai and Gansu, popularizing a da’wah (message) that was heavily informed by Persianate Shi’i mysticism and metaphysics.[3]

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Beyond these points of natural diffusion, Shi’ite influences — and even communities — were brought wholesale into the boundaries of the Chinese world through colonial expansion. The Qing (1644-1911) eighteenth century conquests of Altishahr and the eastern Pamirs (constituting the area now known as Xinjiang) saw the inclusion of Nizari Isma’ili and Twelver Shi’ite communities into the imperial fold.[6] Within the broader context of the People’s Republic of China’s contemporary Muslim population however, (estimated at around 23-30 million), these Shi’ite confessional communities, annexed centuries ago, do not exceed more than 1% of the total, a drop in an ocean of Maturidi (and Ash’arite) Hanafi Sunni belts found across the northwest, southwest and eastern parts of the country. 

Following its takeover of Hong Kong in 1841-1842, the British empire also drew communities of South Asian Shi’ites, including Dawoodi Bohras, Nizari Isma’ilis and Twelvers into the city and other newly “opened” Qing treaty-ports. Some of these communities, such as the Dawoodi Bohras, due to their long-standing involvement in trade and shipping between Shanghai, Hong Kong and the rest of the British empire, became extremely wealthy, exercising considerable influence — for example, through the Incorporated Trustees of the Islamic Community Fund of Hong Kong — that far outstripped their actual numerical size. In the post-1997 handover, many of these Shi’ite communities, embracing both resident Hong Kongers and foreign visitors, have succeeded in maintaining a vibrant religious and cultural life of their own in predominantly non-Muslim Hong Kong.

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According to the hussaynia’s sheikh Ahmed al-Jadiri in an interview with the (Iraqi) al-Farqadayn TV channel, the space was initially established, through the support of Arab businessmen, as a special-use prayer room.

https://www.mei.edu/publications/transnational-shiism-southern-china-and-party-states-hawza-diplomacy

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Chinese reporter converts to Shia Islam at Imam Ridha holy shrine

Based on his previous interest and after visiting holy city of Mashhad, a Chinese reporter was deeply impacted by the spirituality and divine attraction of the Razavi Illuminated Shrine and converted to Islam.

In the ceremony held by the management of non-Iranian pilgrims' affairs of Astan Quds Razavi, Wang Yun converted to Islam, after reciting his Shahadatein (two formula of faith). Following his conversion, he chose Ali as his name.

https://erfan.ir/english/83670.html

 

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@Haji 2003, wherever and whenever NATO needs destabilization, Salafi jihadists are magically there...as if through osmosis (waves magic wand)

Edited by Eddie Mecca
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Not the Uyghurs this time but another Muslim group in another province

 

My initial reaction to this was that architectural features of places of worship are not really a big deal

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The last major mosque in China to have retained Arabic-style features has lost its domes and had its minarets radically modified, marking what experts say is the completion of a government campaign to sinicise the country’s Muslim places of worship

 

The political dimension. The article deals with Yunnan province in the West of China, whereas Xinjiang, where the Uyghurs live, is in the East.

Quote

 

Hui communities have typically been given more latitude than Uyghurs to practise their faith because the government sees them as being better integrated with the Han majority and does not have concerns about Hui separatism. But clashes have occasionally broken out over plans to modify or destroy mosques.

 

 

But while mosque architecture may not be a big issue, the following is:

Quote

 

In February Beijing tightened its regulations on religious expression to ensure that faiths “adhere to the direction of sinicisation”. Several local authorities already ban under-18s from attending mosques, and in Najiaying, minors are banned from fasting.

 

 

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23 hours ago, Haji 2003 said:

But while mosque architecture may not be a big issue, the following is:

Salam both of Turkey & KSa are trying to change architecture of mosques  in these regions totally into their so called neo-ottoman Turkish or  KSA-Arabic design while for centuries since entering Islam to China all mosques have had mixture of Chinese & Islamic design which changing design of mosques by Turkey & KSa is likewise a type capture the flag game  for them . 

23 hours ago, Haji 2003 said:

In February Beijing tightened its regulations on religious expression to ensure that faiths “adhere to the direction of sinicisation”. Several local authorities already ban under-18s from attending mosques, and in Najiaying, minors are banned from fasting.

They are working on brainwashing of young generations by spreading their new style of worship & costumes & fasting of neo-ottoman style or KSa-Arabic style .

footnote :some user have accused Iran to spreading it's influence in Iraq , Syria & lebanon by spreading it's  style of rebuilding shrines 7 mosques in these regions. :blabla::hahaha::censored:

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22 hours ago, Ashvazdanghe said:

Salam both of Turkey & KSa are trying to change architecture of mosques  in these regions totally into their so called neo-ottoman Turkish or  KSA-Arabic design

Yes, I don't have a big issue with mosque design, because as far as I know (happy to be corrected) our faith has no guidance on this.

A pro-China account on Twitter says that mosques in China historically had a Chinese style but in the 20th century adopted one that was more similar to what we are familiar with. I don't know if this is true or not, but that's what he said.

Ultimately we will see governments have a stance towards Islam that ranges from full-blown hostility to one that is more accommodating and the latter will often involve some sort of state sponsorship/influence.

This will happen with Islam more than with other ideologies simply because Islam can have such a strong influence on its adherents.

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On 11/15/2023 at 2:15 AM, JannahLM said:

I've always wondered why this gets so little attention while Palestine gets so much. Shouldn't we be speaking out against all atrocities?

This gets a huge amount of attention and it gets sponsored heavily by western states, I see a lot of salafi channels and pro western channels posting this stuff. 

The problem with it is a lot of the claims made are highly exaggerated, so much so that even western countries are calling out these lies and saying that it "damages their message". 

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