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In the Name of God بسم الله
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Haji 2003

Ummayyad Coin

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I can't make out the border but the writing in the centre of first one says: Allahu ahad, Allah us-Samad, lum Yalid wa lum yulad ..?.. Amir ul momimeen ....??

Second one : La illaha ilillah hu wahdahu la shareeka la hu

Edited by starlight

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Second  coin/flip side:

La Ilaha illa Allah wahdahu la shareeka lahu.

Outer circle I got : Muhammad Rasul Allah arsalahu bil hudaa wa din al haqq liyudh-hirahu alladdeeni kullahu

Edited by habib e najjaar

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Off topic: They inscribed the name of RasulAllah (صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم) on their coins and still committed unimaginable atrocities against his grandsons.

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30 minutes ago, habib e najjaar said:

Second  coin/flip side:

La Ilaha illa Allah wahdahu la shareeka lahu.

Outer circle I got : Muhammad Rasul Allah arsalahu bil hudaa wa din al haqq liyudh-hirahu alladdeeni kullahu

Thanks, I'll dig up a link to a documentary that I posted a while back. It made claims about Ummayyad references (or lack thereof) to the Prophet ((صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم))

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1 minute ago, Haji 2003 said:

Thanks, I'll dig up a link to a documentary that I posted a while back. It made claims about Ummayyad references (or lack thereof) to the Prophet ((صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم))

Hmm.. that would be quite unlikely I'd think. Remember, they were relying very heavily on their blood links to the Prophet s.a w to gain/claim legitimacy. For some parts of the wider ummah, it came as a shock that the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) were that much closer in blood to the Prophet (صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم). 

All along, they were blowing the "family of the Prophet" trumpet and actually keeping the real and close family of the Prophet from being known.

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Salams,

I don't have much experience with hijazi texts -- or really any texts without dots. You need a lot more experience than I have with Arabic to be able to do it well. I also have little experience with numismatics that I would've picked up formulas and generic texts to help understand this one, it's a pity there's no reference for this to an existing database of Islamic coins, there might've been more information then on the text. Nevertheless, a first attempt at reading the coin:

On 10/13/2019 at 2:57 PM, Haji 2003 said:

19650776-0-image-a-20_1570960371079.jpg

Just the middle portion:

الله أحد الله الصمد لم يلد ولم يولد معدن أمير المومنين بالحجاز

God is one, God is self-sufficient, neither siring or sired. The metal of the Amir al-Muminin in al-Hijaz.

I will try to get to the text going around the perimeter afterwards, all I could currently make out was بسم الله and immediately prior to it منه

[correction of another mistaken reading, initially أبد instead of أحد, the latter would be more tenuous as I'm not aware of such language being used for God in the Umayyad period compounded with the paraphrase of Surah Ikhlas as another member pointed out, أحد is the correct reading as well since there is a dip below the baseline meaning the letter isn't a ب but a ح]

On 10/13/2019 at 2:57 PM, Haji 2003 said:

19650778-0-image-a-19_1570960366445.jpg

The middle portion:

لا إله إلا الله وحده لا شريك له

There is no God but God, alone and with no partners to him.

Around the perimeter:

محمد رسول الله أرسله بالهدى ودين الحق ليظهره على الدين كله

Muhammad is the Messenger of God, he sent him with guidance and true religion that he may make it victorious over all religions.

Edited by Ibn Al-Ja'abi

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17 minutes ago, Ibn Al-Ja'abi said:

The top coin outer circle says: 

بِسْم الله ضرب هذا الدينار سنة

Bismillah this dinar was pressed year .... 

I can't make out the year! 

It should read:

بسم الله ضرب هذا الدين(ا)ر سنة خمس ومئه

In the name of God, this Dinar was struck in the year one-hundred-and-five.

 

2 hours ago, Haji 2003 said:

Thanks, I'll dig up a link to a documentary that I posted a while back. It made claims about Ummayyad references (or lack thereof) to the Prophet ((صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم))

If you are referring to the revisionist hypothesis put forth by Crone et al. then you'd need to find earlier coins or inscriptions. They posit that the change was around AD 690, this coin would fit in with their narrative.

Edited by Ibn Al-Ja'abi

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29 minutes ago, Ibn Al-Ja'abi said:

 

It should read:

بسم الله ضرب هذا الدين(ا)ر سنة خمس ومئه

In the name of God, this Dinar was struck in the year one-hundred-and-five.

Indeed. 

 

'بالحجاز' Is a good one. I would have not guessed it.

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6 hours ago, Ibn Al-Ja'abi said:

If you are referring to the revisionist hypothesis put forth by Crone et al. then you'd need to find earlier coins or inscriptions. They posit that the change was around AD 690, this coin would fit in with their narrative.

Ah yes, that was it, thanks.

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https://britishmuseum.withgoogle.com/object/gold-coin-of-abd-al-malik

Quote

This is the first issue of coins struck by the Umayyad caliph ‘Abd al-Malik (reigned AD 685–706) as part of his revolutionary reform of the Islamic coinage in AD 696–7.

‘Abd al-Malik’s reform introduced a purely epigraphic coinage which created a complete break with the past. Images were replaced by Quranic verses and the profession of faith, the shahada, in Kufic script. The central inscription on one side reads ‘There is no God but Allah alone. He has no partner’. Along the margin appears Sura 9.33 from the Qur'an. The central inscription on the other side states that ‘God is one, God is eternal, He was not born nor does He give birth’. Here, the marginal inscription gives the date of the gold dinar as Hijri year 77/AD 696–7.

The inscriptions, which do not include the name of the caliph, state the essence of the profession of faith, the shahada. From this time Quranic inscriptions predominate on Islamic coins, but figural do not disappear completely.

Along with the new design came a new weight standard. The Byzantine standard of 4.38 g for the gold solidus was now adjusted to 4.25 g for the gold dinar.

 

Guess they're kind of similar... 

Edited by Ali~J

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