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In the Name of God بسم الله

Honour killings

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Salam everyone,

This could be useful for my assignment, which mainly circulates around the murder of Qandeel Baloch. I want to know  other peoples' perspective here about honour killings, and what does Islam itself say about it?

This is my view

Honour killings refer to killing a family member due to shame or bringing dishonour. I strongly disagree, and even though I was raised in a conservative household, my parents condemned such beliefs. No matter how inappropriate or shameful a girl is viewed by the society, regaining one’s family’s honour by murder is unjust and immoral. A woman can be the target to her family for a myriad of reasons; committing adultery, wearing inappropriate clothing, engaging in homosexual activity, being the victim of rape and assault , renouncing their faith etc. Many cultures that view this crime as “honourable” is misleading; the act of killing your own daughter or sibling does not define the word “honour”. It still happens in a few countries, where violence is still used to prevent a woman from having a freedom of choice or to go against the conservative society’s norms.

 In Qandeel’s case, her rise to fame began when she uploaded social media posts that were deemed outrageous by the conservative Pakistani community.

It became worse after the incident with Mufti Abdul Qawi where she was accused of being flirtatious with him. However, her purpose of meeting the cleric was to show her followers that the society’s perception of some religious scholars contradicts as to who they really are. When Baloch’s posts with him became viral, she began receiving death threats and when she publicly confronted the media, along with Abdul Qawi, they refused to believe her. Qandeel no longer felt safe, so she returned to her family and was killed the next day by her tyrant brother, who still has no regrets in killing her. She literally ran away from danger to reunite with her family and then facing murder the following day.

Now I know that some people here in particular (not going to mention any names) will probs start to come at me. First off, I don’t fully support the actions of Qandeel, especially when it came to exposure of her body and other acts. But I do support her in the sense that she advocated women's rights in a conservative country where they're treated like some kind of object and not an actual human being. I support her for going against their norms.  She gave them a voice and that motivation to stand up for themselves. What upset me off was that if they wanted to kill Qandeel then they should've sent death threats to the mufti because he was also being a fool and a b*****d.  Yeah I know he got suspended from his place but thats nothing. Like in public he'd be very strict about his views on women, like "they can't leave without a man" or "they can't leave without their consent, they can't have jobs apparently, they must stay home etc..,". Yet he allows an attractive woman who tends to show her figure to enter his hotel while he is alone, he should have just refused. 

fee amanillah

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I completely agree with your stance on honour killings, and no matter the sin committed, only Allah has the right to take away life. 

You mentioned her advocating for womens rights. When I searched her up all I could find were provocative selfies which were why she was so controversial. Did she do anything in particular in the cause of womens rights in oppressive communities?

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1 hour ago, habib e najjaar said:

While it may be noble of you to try and expose honour killings for being an unislamic, barbaric and despicable system, I don't think giving qandeel baloch any more publicity than she already got is doing the topic any justice. Talk about innocent women who have been subjected to honour killings after being victims of rape or abuse. No matter how relevant a topic is, having a wrong subject as the face of the topic will only draw (predictable) backlash against the entire topic.

The topic that I am doing is of relevance to qandeel, that is the question of the assignment. wdym wrong subject, could you please elaborate?

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1 hour ago, 2Timeless said:

no matter the sin committed, only Allah has the right to take away life.

I'm not sure If I understood what you said correctly, but there are sins which according to sharia means death penalty as far as I know or did you mean that no human has the right to kill another human regardless? Because that is not what Islam says.

 

 

As far as the subject goes: I would personally not be able to kill my own child and there are very few scenarios in which I can think of a justification, such as a child thats an enemy of Islam and kills innocent Muslims.

But in the less extreme cases, such as the child becoming a murtad, I would personally break all contact with such a child and disown him or her.

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We have to acknowledge, that although occurring in other cultural communities (such as the internationally famous murder of Du’a Khalil Aswad of the Yazidi community), these too-often—community-sanctioned murders, sanitized with the term "honour killings”, are most prevalent in the Muslim community.  This could be because in Islam you can forgive the murderer of your family member.  This has been used de facto to exonerate male member(s) of the family of the murdered girl.  They murder, are arrested, then “forgiven” (as planned) and then released and completely free.  In some areas, these men are often lauded and garner more of a star status reputation within their community. The entire institution of “honour killing” is sick one from beginning to end.

I don’t think there can be a “wrong” example of these murders.  A human is a human and a murder is a murder. 

Qandeel Baloch was over the top provocative and so was very high profile. An Islamic role model, she wasn’t, but in spite of whatever sins she committed, she did expose hypocrisy.  Also, because she was high profile, her murder was high profile.  I doubt very much that her brother thought he was going to get any prison time; her brother's proud, almost chest beating, interview after he had killed her gave the impression that he thought he was free and clear with the addition of a few brownie points.

If she had not been high profile, there would have been no investigation and no follow up - the parents would forgive his killing of his sister and life would go on in the community…. Till the next killing.  One thing that does separate her from the other killings of girls who are murdered for no other reason except to fluff someone’s twisted ego, is that it forced the justice system (because of the international light on this) to acknowledge that a murder is a murder and the killer needs to be held accountable. A draft law was recommended, that gave the justice system the right to prosecute and sentence the killer even if the family forgives their actions.  I don’t know if that law has been put into place, but the accountability for “honour killings" would not have pursued if the case did not get international attention.  Hopefully it was not just for show till the hype died down.

Edited by Maryaam
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4 hours ago, 3wliya_maryam said:

 

Now I know that some people here in particular (not going to mention any names) will probs start to come at me. First off, I don’t fully support the actions of Qandeel, especially when it came to exposure of her body and other acts. But I do support her in the sense that she advocated women's rights in a conservative country where they're treated like some kind of object and not an actual human being. I support her for going against their norms.  She gave them a voice and that motivation to stand up for themselves. What upset me off was that if they wanted to kill Qandeel then they should've sent death threats to the mufti because he was also being a fool and a b*****d.  Yeah I know he got suspended from his place but thats nothing. Like in public he'd be very strict about his views on women, like "they can't leave without a man" or "they can't leave without their consent, they can't have jobs apparently, they must stay home etc..,". Yet he allows an attractive woman who tends to show her figure to enter his hotel while he is alone, he should have just refused. 

She did not stand for women's rights. She was not sane at the first place. She often said in interviews that since her family treated her badly and considered her bad so she want to really become a bad. She was a tool for media to get ratings and purposefully said bad things on facebook on instigation of bad names in industry. I always had the feeling that she will get in trouble because of her being an object of seduction. 

Albeit, I think the honor killing should be dealt with strict measures but even in law the end of such people is not good.

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4 hours ago, 2Timeless said:

I completely agree with your stance on honour killings, and no matter the sin committed, only Allah has the right to take away life. 

You mentioned her advocating for womens rights. When I searched her up all I could find were provocative selfies which were why she was so controversial. Did she do anything in particular in the cause of womens rights in oppressive communities?

I had the same thoughts. I certainly don't condone honour killings, it has nothing to do with Islam. 

On the subject of advocating women's rights, I am not aware that she did anything of the kind.

Wallahu a'lam 

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1 hour ago, habib e najjaar said:

I meant she is a wrong example to discuss honour killings about.

I have no prior knowledge of the Qandeel Baloch case and from what I can see from a quick search yes she most probably provoked in a conservative environment. However I don't think it is relevant whether the victim was in any way "guilty" or not. As far as I can see there are two aspects to this. One is the legal aspect and one is the religious aspect. If a person is guilty of an offense, whether secular law or sharia there must be a due process. What ever punishment the court find appropriate must be carried out only by the proper authorities. Not the vigilante justice by a family member or an angry crowd. Such vigilante justice is a crime in it self because it usurps the power of the proper authority.
From the religious point of view I think the people who do these honor-killings need to question them selves if their actions is done for Dunya or the Aakhirah. Honor is about other peoples approval. Not the approval of God. What do these people really think Allah is going to ask them on the day of judgement. Killing someone who only Allah know if is innocent for the approval of people in this world? These people may be conservative, but to me it doesn't look like they they have put much thought in their religion.

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2 minutes ago, Revert1963 said:

I have no prior knowledge of the Qandeel Baloch case and from what I can see from a quick search yes she most probably provoked in a conservative environment. However I don't think it is relevant whether the victim was in any way "guilty" or not. As far as I can see there are two aspects to this. One is the legal aspect and one is the religious aspect. If a person is guilty of an offense, whether secular law or sharia there must be a due process. What ever punishment the court find appropriate must be carried out only by the proper authorities. Not the vigilante justice by a family member or an angry crowd. Such vigilante justice is a crime in it self because it usurps the power of the proper authority.
From the religious point of view I think the people who do these honor-killings need to question them selves if their actions is done for Dunya or the Aakhirah. Honor is about other peoples approval. Not the approval of God. What do these people really think Allah is going to ask them on the day of judgement. Killing someone who only Allah know if is innocent for the approval of people in this world? These people may be conservative, but to me it doesn't look like they they have put much thought in their religion.

You must understand that in the context of the societies where so called honour killings happen, when you publicize honour killings as being the likes of qandeel baloch being murdered by their families (a woman who indecently and deliberately exposes herself, an online seductress etc) then you are doing nothing for the victims of honour killings except further victimising them. They all get tainted with the same brush.. women who behaved so immorally and "called the wrath" of their "decent" relatives upon themselves. "Honour" killings or any type of murder has no place in Islam. But for all women who get killed in this way to be seen as other qandeel balochs is to slander them post humously as if murdering them was not enough.

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4 hours ago, Soldiers and Saffron said:

I'm not sure If I understood what you said correctly, but there are sins which according to sharia means death penalty as far as I know or did you mean that no human has the right to kill another human regardless? Because that is not what Islam says.

I'm not very well versed in sharia law, but I am certain that sharia law does not dictate that it is permissible for a brother to murder his sister over a few promiscuous photos. There are rules and regulations that need to be followed. If we're talking about sharia, shouldnt she have been tried in a court with witnesses and a judge? 

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Just now, habib e najjaar said:

You must understand that in the context of the societies where so called honour killings happen, when you publicize honour killings as being the likes of qandeel baloch being murdered by their families (a woman who indecently and deliberately exposes herself, an online seductress etc) then you are doing nothing for the victims of honour killings except further victimising them. They all get tainted with the same brush.. women who behaved so immorally and "called the wrath" of their "decent" relatives upon themselves. "Honour" killings or any type of murder has no place in Islam. But for all women who get killed in this way to be seen as other qandeel balochs is to slander them post humously as if murdering them was not enough.

Then the people of those societies has to be taught religion and the rule of law. But of cause this is tricky. I guess that this mostly take place in tribal areas where they don't like the rule of law. And a lot of clerics are probably afraid they will turn away these people by telling them that honour and pride is the splendors of the dunya where as submission an being humble and forgiving will benefit them in the Aakhirah. But they should be told this and preferably by the Imam in their local mosque.

Edited by Revert1963
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1 minute ago, Revert1963 said:

Then the people of those societies has to be taught religion and the rule of law. But of cause this is tricky. I guess that this mostly take place in tribal areas where they don't like the rule of law. And a lot of clerics are probably afraid they will turn these people by telling them that honour and pride is the splendors of the dunya where as submission an being humble and forgiving will benefit them in the Aakhirah. But they should be told this and preferably by the Imam in their local mosque.

This practise is extremely widespread amongst Hindus (but less publicity on it). The danger of discussing honor killings with qandeel baloch as the poster child is that it will get distorted. Talk about it for what it is: irreligious tyranny, and not "a moozlim reaction to bad moozlims"

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Just now, habib e najjaar said:

This practise is extremely widespread amongst Hindus (but less publicity on it). The danger of discussing honor killings with qandeel baloch as the poster child is that it will get distorted. Talk about it for what it is: irreligious tyranny, and not "a moozlim reaction to bad moozlims"

I guess the same argument could be made within Hinduism. It is bad Karma. However I don't know how religious the Hindus who do this stuff are where as the Muslims who do it portraying themselves as upholders of religious piety. 

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Just now, Revert1963 said:

I guess the same argument could be made within Hinduism. It is bad Karma. However I don't know how religious the Hindus who do this stuff are where as the Muslims who do it portraying themselves as upholders of religious piety. 

Well.. I don't think we should even be going down that line of thought because it is extremely obvious to any unbiased observer that a lot of cultural bad behavior is justified by saying: my religion allows this. Does this make it a religious debate? No. Acknowledging a non religious problem (none of these religions can show you a stable source of such decisions to murder) as a religion based problem which is why it occurs in various religions. I know a girl at campus - Christian - whose mouth was split into a joker like smile because she jokingly told her father she would marry a Muslim man. Her father was a pastor.

This is a matter of communities with crazy justice systems and imbalanced gender roles.. they occur across religions. Some areas have a higher occurence rate because generally, the rule of law does not exist or is not upheld in these areas. I.e impunity in lawlessness has magnified problems which have become controlled in other (geographical) areas which have a firmer arm of law.

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I don't know if it counts as honour killings or not but some Shi'a jurists in the past said that if a man comes into the house and sees a man on the same bed with his wife doing haram, he can end both of them.

Al-Khoei says:

Quote

It is well known that if a man sees another man committing adultery with his wife, and has no fear of sustaining harm, he can kill both of them. However, it appears difficult that this order should be valid. However his wife does not become unlawful for him.

So there is disagreement about this ruling.

Edited by Sumerian
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4 hours ago, Sumerian said:

I don't know if it counts as honour killings or not but some Shi'a jurists in the past said that if a man comes into the house and sees a man on the same bed with his wife doing haram, he can end both of them.

Al-Khoei says:

So there is disagreement about this ruling.

This isn't honour killings, its "revenge" and we would be talking manslaughter as opposed to murder (given the blatant provocation). Don't see a situation where one would not sustain (legal) harm in killing them both under current legal systems.

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1 hour ago, habib e najjaar said:

This isn't honour killings, its "revenge" and we would be talking manslaughter as opposed to murder (given the blatant provocation). Don't see a situation where one would not sustain (legal) harm in killing them both under current legal systems.

Yes, under current legal systems, of course it is different. I'm talking about what Islamic Law says.

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4 minutes ago, Sumerian said:

Yes, under current legal systems, of course it is different. I'm talking about what Islamic Law says.

Islamic law makes an exception for the requirement of witnesses in the situation a man finds his wife in such a situation. Again, the topic under discussion here are these so called "honour" killings which normally do not involve wives but daughters and sisters. There is no such concept in Islam. E.g a man finding his daughter committing zinaa cannot murder her. It goes through the normal islami justice system.

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#اسراء_غريب 

Trending on Twitter

Her relatives even attacked this poor woman in hospital after sustaining injuries and escaping from their first attempt. All because she took a snap with her fiance and his sister, plus her immediate family were aware of the meeting.
 
 
Discretion advised, audio from the hospital
 
 
There is no honour in this
 
Edited by Propaganda_of_the_Deed
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5 hours ago, Abu Hadi said:

First, I will say that Honor Killing is wrong. It shouldn't be called 'Honor Killing' as there is no honor in it. It is murder, plain and simple. I had never heard about this 'Kandeel' murder case, I didn't know who she was. I did a little reading on it because of this thread and the OPs thoughts (which I found interesting). Obviously, I don't think she deserved to be murdered, but when you are promoting indecency in a society like Pakistan, where this is not as common, as say where I live, you are taking a huge risk. This is especially common for young women in our society today who put things on the Internet and mistakenly believe that those things will just stay in the online world. Depending on the context and where they live, and what they say, there could be unforeseen consequences for doing this, especially in a place like Pakistan where there are active and powerful terrorist groups who have links to the Government. 

That is why I tell brothers and sisters, especiallly the younger ones, don't put anything online that you wouldn't mind if your grandma saw it. If you want to change society, change it with your thoughts, your writing, your social activism, etc. Don't go with the cheap hacks  to get attention like posting semi naked pictures of yourself, etc. These usually backfire, and especially if you are a young women in society like Pakistan, could actually put your life in danger, as we saw with this case. 

I think about a young lady like Ilhan Omar, who is young and attractive, wearing hijab from a conservative community. She could have easily done the same thing as the lady in the 'Kandeel' case. But instead, she decided to use her words, her thoughts, her ideas, to push forward her message and the ideas she believes in. Now if you think about which one of these ladies is going to have a more lasting impact on the societies where they live, lived, and maybe even the world, I think it is an easy answer. So if that is the goal, to make a positive impact on the society where one lives, then I think the answer is clear which route to take. If the goal is only to get fame and attention, that is not a good or worthy goal, In my humble opinion. 

 

 

 

I find it interesting that this woman's life choices Trump her murder.  Whatever this woman did or didn't do, the much bigger sin is her murder and the fact that it was considered a slam-dunk-freebie sin, if carried out by a family member. When her murder is acknowledged and then quickly followed by a big "BUT", it negates your previous statement.  There is a much longer diatribe focused primarily on this woman's behaviour and how it is much more important to address and it as a lesson to other girls to not follow her ways ... or guess what could happen....  so, "honour killings" could be avoided if girls follow the community rules....  hmm...  Don't think so.  Some young girls have been murdered because they were victims of rape.  The reason for that could be followed by a "but" as well. We could easily form another diatribe around how they were also responsible for their rape... and hence they could bear responsibility for their own murder. 

The murder of these young girls is a huge problem that appears to be, culturally, very uncomfortable to address.  So much so that this cultural practice now (and has for some time but has been kept quiet) also occurs in the same cultural communities, but outside of Eastern countries - for example it is occurring both in the Muslim communities of the United Kingdom and in the Turkish communities in Germany.  There are also numerous example in the US and Canada.  Many women/girls live in terror that they will be caught and turned in by the community for transgressions such as leaving their assigned husband or even talking to boys at school. The consequence of defying the family leads to their all consuming terror while being monitored and stalked and then murdered.  And the community participates with their silence and their excuses and covers it up for a variety of reasons.. 

Deflecting like this does not address the issue of outright murder of women.  This is a big reason as to why it continues.

Edited by Maryaam
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23 hours ago, 2Timeless said:

I completely agree with your stance on honour killings, and no matter the sin committed, only Allah has the right to take away life. 

You mentioned her advocating for womens rights. When I searched her up all I could find were provocative selfies which were why she was so controversial. Did she do anything in particular in the cause of womens rights in oppressive communities?

I am still currently doing research on it; but the assignment itself mentioned that qandeel was an advocate for womens' rights. I feel like her actions especially with her taking provocative selfies, going on public media and all high profile was a means of her trying to show women that they have a voice too and that they don't need to follow society's conservative norms. 

 

5 hours ago, Abu Hadi said:

First, I will say that Honor Killing is wrong. It shouldn't be called 'Honor Killing' as there is no honor in it. It is murder, plain and simple. I had never heard about this 'Kandeel' murder case, I didn't know who she was. I did a little reading on it because of this thread and the OPs thoughts (which I found interesting). Obviously, I don't think she deserved to be murdered, but when you are promoting indecency in a society like Pakistan, where this is not as common, as say where I live, you are taking a huge risk. This is especially common for young women in our society today who put things on the Internet and mistakenly believe that those things will just stay in the online world. Depending on the context and where they live, and what they say, there could be unforeseen consequences for doing this, especially in a place like Pakistan where there are active and powerful terrorist groups who have links to the Government. 

That is why I tell brothers and sisters, especiallly the younger ones, don't put anything online that you wouldn't mind if your grandma saw it. If you want to change society, change it with your thoughts, your writing, your social activism, etc. Don't go with the cheap hacks  to get attention like posting semi naked pictures of yourself, etc. These usually backfire, and especially if you are a young women in society like Pakistan, could actually put your life in danger, as we saw with this case. 

I think about a young lady like Ilhan Omar, who is young and attractive, wearing hijab from a conservative community. She could have easily done the same thing as the lady in the 'Kandeel' case. But instead, she decided to use her words, her thoughts, her ideas, to push forward her message and the ideas she believes in. Now if you think about which one of these ladies is going to have a more lasting impact on the societies where they live, lived, and maybe even the world, I think it is an easy answer. So if that is the goal, to make a positive impact on the society where one lives, then I think the answer is clear which route to take. If the goal is only to get fame and attention, that is not a good or worthy goal, In my humble opinion. 

 

I agree with some of your points, but my point was about honour killings being a serious crime that has no relevance to Islam because it is pure murder. I don't fully support her; I disagree with some of the things she did, but she wasn't even a practicing Muslim to begin with. I watched a short documentary about some women discussing their views on the case, and one them said that in a country like Pakistan even if she were to wear modest clothes they'd still point fingers at her. Obviously it wouldn't be as worse as Qandeel because she was more provocative, but you can see how quickly women get judged not just in Pakistan but in other countries. The problem with Qandeel was that she wasn't scared to be high profile, that was her own personal decision she decided to make, but that was also a mistake. I saw in the documentary how that instantly backfired. 

 

20 hours ago, Flying_Eagle said:

Albeit, I think the honor killing should be dealt with strict measures but even in law the end of such people is not good.

Albeit I think the honor killing should be abolished, wdym strict measures 

Edited by 3wliya_maryam
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18 hours ago, 2Timeless said:

I'm not very well versed in sharia law, but I am certain that sharia law does not dictate that it is permissible for a brother to murder his sister over a few promiscuous photos. There are rules and regulations that need to be followed. If we're talking about sharia, shouldnt she have been tried in a court with witnesses and a judge? 

I was referring to killings in general as I assumed you were as well in your comment, where you not?

As far as this case in particular goes, I don't know the details of it so I can't really say what's wrong or right about it.

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42 minutes ago, Maryaam said:

 

 

Deflecting like this does not address the issue of outright murder of women.  This is a big reason as to why it continues.

I think you have misinterpreted what the brother was saying. Her murder and honour killings in general have been quite clearly and unconditionally condemned by him and various others in this thread. Nobody is disputing or even discussing this.

However, condemning her murder does not equate to condoning her actions and this is what is being clarified here.

Wallahu a'lam 

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44 minutes ago, 3wliya_maryam said:

I am still currently doing research on it; but the assignment itself mentioned that qandeel was an advocate for womens' rights. I feel like her actions especially with her taking provocative selfies, going on public media and all high profile was a means of her trying to show women that they have a voice too and that they don't need to follow society's conservative norms. 

 

Women have had a prominent role in her country for a long time. They had a female head of state decades ago while some Western countries still haven't had one. Public media is therefore not the issue. 

Wallahu a'lam 

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24 minutes ago, Mahdavist said:

I think you have misinterpreted what the brother was saying. Her murder and honour killings in general have been quite clearly and unconditionally condemned by him and various others in this thread. Nobody is disputing or even discussing this.

However, condemning her murder does not equate to condoning her actions and this is what is being clarified here.

Wallahu a'lam 

I have not read one statement on here condoning her actions. 90% of the thread is doing just the opposite so I don't know how much more it needs to be clarified.  

However, there is a definite tacitly accepted link between her actions and her subsequent murder which very much serves to deflect from the seriousness of her being murdered by a family member.

This is similar to the murders of other girls, in that they are shamed and vilified pre and post murder, to justify the actions taken against them.  

The point I was addressing is that these women are not responsible for their murders, their murderers are.  Baloch can be criticized for a lot - and so can those who cavorted with her - but because of her high profile status, her murder was caught on international media.  

So instead of addressing the internationally raised issue of in-house murders of sisters and daughters, it is much much easier to condemn her actions rather than focus on her murder.  It is much more comfortable than addressing the elephant in the room.

 The only reason there was talk of changing the law was because of the international media coverage of an "honour killing".  I don't really care what this particular victim did or with whom, if coverage of her murder prevents even one young girl  from being shunned, stalked, terrorized, possibly tortured and murdered and with the added insult of her murderer being hailed a hero.  

Edited by Maryaam
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22 minutes ago, Maryaam said:

I have not read one statement on here condoning her actions. 90% of the thread is doing just the opposite so I don't know how much more it needs to be clarified.  

However, there is a definite tacitly accepted link between her actions and her subsequent murder which very much serves to deflect from the seriousness of her being murdered by a family member.

This is similar to the murders of other girls, in that they are shamed and vilified pre and post murder, to justify the actions taken against them.  

The point I was addressing is that these women are not responsible for their murders, their murderers are.  Baloch can be criticized for a lot - and so can those who cavorted with her - but because of her high profile status, her murder was caught on international media.  

So instead of addressing the internationally raised issue of in-house murders of sisters and daughters, it is much much easier to condemn her actions rather than focus on her murder.  It is much more comfortable than addressing the elephant in the room.

 The only reason there was talk of changing the law was because of the international media coverage of an "honour killing".  I don't really care what this particular victim did or with whom, if coverage of her murder prevents even one young girl  from being shunned, stalked, terrorized, possibly tortured and murdered and with the added insult of her murderer being hailed a hero.  

I assume you are referring to discussions outside of this forum because I certainly haven't seen anyone here suggest that she was responsible for her murder. 

Wallahu a'lam 

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1 hour ago, Mahdavist said:

I assume you are referring to discussions outside of this forum because I certainly haven't seen anyone here suggest that she was responsible for her murder. 

Wallahu a'lam 

 

Maybe read a little more carefully… just some of the comments:

She was “Wrong example.. for honour killings”. 

She would “Taint the perception... of honour killings” 

We "should talk about innocent women”  - not her…. because she is guilty?

She would (and did) ……. Get in trouble as an object of seduction….  

"Her killing was wrong, BUT…. […..followed by lengthy ongoing repeat of former condemnations of her…..]

Claiming she is not worthy of victim status due to her indecent behaviour.

I agree with what was stated by a poster above:  "I don't think it is relevant whether the victim was in any way "guilty" or not.”

The issue is much much greater than one specific dead person who is very easy (so easy it is almost a cop out) to condemn as her actions were very in your face blatant.  

 

But - my main point is that condemnation of the victims is commonplace (and for some you would have to dig very deep to find something wrong with them on any level) within their community and is accepted with very little meaningful censure from the outside community.   Seems that it is absolutely mentally and emotionally necessary to justify their murder, at least on some level, so people can feel comfortable about going about their day. 

  

 

Edited by Maryaam
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1 hour ago, Maryaam said:

 Seems that it is absolutely mentally and emotionally necessary to justify their murder, at least on some level, so people can feel comfortable about going about their day. 

  

 

Not sure where you saw a justification. We probably aren't reading the same thing.

Wallahu a'lam 

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