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In the Name of God بسم الله

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Salam Alakum

Back then before Islam was established by Prophet Mohmmed (صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم), the people that were living at the time where they didnt have the Qur'an, why didn't Allah introduce Islam when human civilization first began and how would they be judged or will they be forgiven even though some committed shirk practicing Judaism and Christianity. 

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On a side note. I was reading some history from a Russian scholar who specializes in Middle-Eastern and Byzantine history, and he pointed out that the early Arab conquests in the Levant were not driven by religion, as the commanders of the tribes at that time (in the years immediately after the Prophet), were not even technically Muslim--they knew little of the faith, and had minimal exposure to the confidants and family of the Prophet. The conquests were driven by economic and political factors.

I didn't know this, and I wonder how many people int he west realize it. 

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On 7/22/2019 at 8:12 PM, 313lol said:

Salam Alakum

Back then before Islam was established by Prophet Mohmmed (صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم), the people that were living at the time where they didnt have the Qur'an, why didn't Allah introduce Islam when human civilization first began and how would they be judged or will they be forgiven even though some committed shirk practicing Judaism and Christianity. 

Salam. I agree with the brother who replied before me. 

Civilization did not precede Islam. On the contrary, the Qur'an says that every civilization is judged by the principles of Islam, and that we should think deeply of the nations that came before and about the reasons they perished. 

One example is the nation of Lot who were destroyed because they went so far from what Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) declared lawful. And so the Qur'an calls us to observe their ruins and think.

Another such example is Pharaoh, and the Qur'an talks a lot about him too. 

Also Adam (عليه السلام) was a great Prophet of God, and he lived a looong time ago, so it would be wrong to say that civilization preceded Islam. 

Wassalam

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On 7/23/2019 at 4:42 AM, 313lol said:

Salam Alakum

Back then before Islam was established by Prophet Mohmmed (صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم), the people that were living at the time where they didnt have the Qur'an, why didn't Allah introduce Islam when human civilization first began and how would they be judged or will they be forgiven even though some committed shirk practicing Judaism and Christianity. 

Salam based on Holy Qur'an all religions from beginning were one religion & it was Islam from beginning but it's revelation ended by Prophet Muhammd (pbu) to fix misunderstanding of previous people from the one religion of Islam .

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9 hours ago, Kaya said:

Another such example is Pharaoh, and the Qur'an talks a lot about him too. 

Interestingly the Pharaoh Akhenaten (Tutankhamen's father) tried to promote monotheism, whether it was the religion of Abraham, I don't know, but it has what seem to be some startling similarities. But the Egyptian polytheists did not like the idea and the new religion died out. But it does go to show how even a very powerful person can find it very difficult to promote monotheism.

Quote

 

Initially, Akhenaten presented Aten as a variant of the familiar supreme deity Amun-Re (itself the result of an earlier rise to prominence of the cult of Amun, resulting in Amun's becoming merged with the sun God Ra), in an attempt to put his ideas in a familiar Egyptian religious context. However, by Year 9 of his reign, Akhenaten declared that Aten was not merely the supreme God, but the only worshipable God, and that he, Akhenaten, was the only intermediary between Aten and his people. He ordered the defacing of Amun's temples throughout Egypt and, in a number of instances, inscriptions of the plural 'gods' were also removed.[citation needed]

Siliceous limestone fragment of a statue. There are late Aten cartouches on the draped right shoulder. Reign of Akhenaten. From Amarna, Egypt. The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, London

Aten's name also is written differently after Year 9 to emphasize the radicalism of the new regime, which included a ban on images, with the exception of a rayed solar disc, in which the rays (commonly depicted ending in hands) appear to represent the unseen spirit of Aten, who by then was evidently considered not merely a sun God, but rather a universal deity. Representations of the Aten were always accompanied with a sort of hieroglyphic footnote, stating that the representation of the sun as all-encompassing creator was to be taken as just that: a representation of something that, by its very nature as something transcending creation, cannot be fully or adequately represented by any one part of that creation.[citation needed]

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akhenaten

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