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In the Name of God بسم الله
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Simon the Canaanite

Shīʾah Paintings

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On 6/1/2019 at 10:42 AM, Simon the Canaanite said:

Painting of Twelver Shia Muslim scientist, Nāsīr al-Dīn al-Tūsī by Ḥāssan Roḥolāmīn.

He was a polymath, architect, philosopher, physician, physicist, logician, intellectual, scientist, theologian, astronomer, mathematician, biologist, chemist, poet, geographer, engineer and a translator (he spoke Greek, and translated many of their books, and commented on them).
72589-605647052861595-2047257020-n.jpg

Sheikh-e-Toosi is one of those who showed how much creative a human being become....love you Sheikh-e-Toosi Sahab from a newer century.

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On 6/1/2019 at 6:33 PM, Guest ABT said:

It sometimes is costly to speak out against some practises which have no precedent with the Prophet or his Ahlul Bayt, and which may do more harm than good, irrespective of they are permissible (and many questionable things are permissible). This unfortunately leads some with poor judgement to throw slanders, but I am glad that hasn't happened hear, and the brother has taken our criticism of the pictures in a polite manner. 

Really, we can get along with everyone if we want, we can choose to sit on the fence and allow the pure madhab of ale Muhammed to be tainted with things like this, maintain our popularity and wide-spread appeal, or we can do the right thing. 

Agree with you brother, the pictures of twelve Imams are prohibited even to the Holy Personalities themselves because they could give rise to pre-Arabic idol worshiping about Which Imam Reza (عليه السلام) said: "Idol worshiping started when pious people of their age died and their status were built to remember them so the first ones bowed in respect to them and the coming generations started prostrated before them and then hold them as deities". 

That is the all Mujtahids prohibit depicting pictures of holy personalities. 

@Simon the Canaanite brother, I would also like to say that there is no harm in those pictures depicting oppressions done to Martyers of Karbala but depicting their faces in pictures or any of our Holy Imam is not religiously sanctioned. I hope you would add our concerns just for knowledge.  On the other hand, I really enjoyed portraits of Persian monarchs some of whom I have read in my history books like Shah Tamshap and Qajar Dynasty kings. 

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On 6/2/2019 at 11:31 AM, Simon the Canaanite said:

“Painting of Shah Abbas,” 1628, by Frans II Francken.

800px-Abbas-I-as-a-new-Caesar-being-hono

One of the most notorious kings, I remember from Persian Kings. He really gave difficult time to Moghals of India and conquered Qandahar. Also killed his own son.

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On 6/5/2019 at 10:12 PM, Propaganda_of_the_Deed said:

Some people are not a fan of Orientalism art, but I like how they capture a certain atmosphere. Bearing in mind it was largely how Europeans imagined the exotic, mysterious East, some without having been there.

Jean-Leon Gerome - "The Shrine of Imam Hussein" (عليه السلام)

 

3f1436e2c9a61048fe9e754a28569a89.jpg

 

:salam:

Cairo maybe ?

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39 minutes ago, Simon the Canaanite said:

I’ve been to the one in Cairo, and it looks nothing like this.

Been there too, but don't forget it was during the late 19th century, so would look different.

Not saying Karbala being depicted is completely implausible, but Cairo does feature heavily in Orientalist art as a location, so @realizm could be correct. 

Quote

 

“The Orient”, a descriptor coined in the nineteenth century, was understood as a cultural and geographical concept inextricably linked to Islam and defined by Turkey, the Levant, Egypt and North Africa.

https://www.sothebys.com/en/articles/orientalism-and-its-impact-on-western-artists

Edited by Propaganda_of_the_Deed

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12 hours ago, Propaganda_of_the_Deed said:

Been there too, but don't forget it was during the late 19th century, so would look different.

No, it wouldn’t. This place has been like (this) since its foundation in the Fatimid period. Most of the architects that used bright (floral motifs) in their works, such as: turquoise, blue, sky blue, dark blue and light blue (similar to the one by Jean-Léon Gérôme) were the Safavid and Turkish ones.

Buildings in Egypt (and elsewhere at the Fatimid period) are known to have a “dusty looking” color. Similar to desert sand.

This is definitely either in Iran or Pakistan, not Egypt. My guess is that he mistook this for the holy shrine. I don’t think there’d be any other logical explanation.

Edited by Abu Nur

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1 hour ago, Simon the Canaanite said:

No, it wouldn’t. This place has been like (this) since its foundation in the Fatimid period. Most of the architects that used bright (floral motifs) in their works, such as: blue, sky blue, dark blue and light blue (similar to the one by Jean-Léon Gérôme) were the Safavid and Turkish ones.

Buildings in Egypt are known to have a “dusty looking” color. Similar to desert sand, because, twas that most dynasties used such a color at that time (which they did). Most likely a combination of the two, however.

This is definitely either in Iran or Pakistan, not Egypt. My guess is that he mistook this for the holy shrine. I don’t think there’d be any other logical explanation.

It is a good point regarding the colour scheme, as he is documented as having visited both Istanbul and Cairo.

 

Although visit Cairo he certainly did, as per his more famous, Evening Prayer where you can make out distinctive Fatimid architecture.

007L19100_B2ND9_reshoot.jpg

medieval-cairo-tour-islamic-and-coptic-s

Quote

Gérôme's path to Orientalism began in 1856, when he travelled to Egypt for the first time. In Cairo, he accumulated a virtual library of souvenirs, costumes, and local crafts, as well as photographs, sketches, and drawings, which served as inspiration for his studio works. Subsequent trips to the region made during the 1860s and 1870s expanded his repertoire of subjects, confirming his talents as an ethnographer and his reputation as a privileged witness to all aspects of Middle Eastern life.

In the present work, Gérôme depicts the daily maghrib, or evening prayer, performed on the housetops of Cairo. In the background, the distinctive skyline of the city is visible, with the Mosque of Muhammad Ali and the Medrasa of Sultan Hasan helping to identify the setting as the Qasaba, near the Bayn al-Qasrayn.

 

 

 

 

 
Gérôme visited the Middle East between 1854 and 1872, Constantinople and Cairo being his preferred locations due to the magnificent architecture and intriguing human subjects. These trips inspired many works which are considered among the finest in the Orientalist genre. 

 

Edited by Propaganda_of_the_Deed

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