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In the Name of God بسم الله
Mohammed-Mehdi

Austria bans Muslim girls from wearing headscarf

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6 hours ago, starlight said:

.I don't know why people get upset at developments like these. You choose to live in a country then you have to follow the laws. 

Are you talking about developments as in the article above?

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5 hours ago, Ali~J said:

I can't even imagine how things will be in several years time when I'm trying to raise my kids.... 

Expectation and realization
We know from our hadith etc that 'Dhulm' or oppression will increase till the return of the Imam (AJTF). At the same time opposition to this oppression, and a longing for goodness will also increase all over the world. It is not that the Imam AJTF will return, and then start spreading the idea of goodness instead of evil.
So this is what we can expect and believe. We can also see this development. 

We
We have to look at ourselves carefully, each individual, and research what are our responsibilities, priorities and (highest) goals.
I find this letter to be a great 'start'. If one can achieve this fully I believe we are doing very well, AlHamdullilaah: 

Advice from His Eminence,Sayyid Ali al-Sistani (may the Almighty prolong his life) to the Believing Youth

Also in a (or more) hadith, we find that one should not worry about death if that person: fulfilled his obligations to Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى), refrains from sin and has a good moral trait. (not sure about wording and sequence). If not, then that person should worry about death (and work towards these goals).
 

Great book IMO: https://www.al-Islam.org/secrets-success-ayatullah-mirza-jafar-subhani Secrets of Success

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6 hours ago, Guest Jaal said:

ell, as Shias, we have nothing against trans people

This is not true.

Some Jurists/ We make a distinction between those that say they always have felt the opposite gender etc and those that are perverse/ just a type of evil (which a lot of those transgenders are).

Also, I don't agree completely with your perspective on LBGT (or so). It is clearly one of the agenda's that are being pushed by the Zionists/Globalists/ or label them as you like. It has been pushed in the mainstream for decades now. In children books etc. This is of the work of Satan and it is one of the enemies of humanity.

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16 minutes ago, Mohammed-Mehdi said:

Are you talking about developments as in the article above?

I meant the news about Hijab ban in Austria. 

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4 hours ago, Ali~J said:

I've never really understood why Iran does fund those operations

The Jurists who have this idea didn't just come up with it themselves. But very important is to make a distinction with those let's say ill and those perverse/Fasiqun/... 

Then, if we look at it with the right perspective I think it makes total sense. In a society, of 80+ million people, for example, you will have these people, and if Islam not nesecerally forbids these changes for some of these people, then why should we oppose it?
 

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14 minutes ago, starlight said:

I meant the news about Hijab ban in Austria. 

Ok, so I see that as a yes.

 

I do agree, things will get worse, that is a reality and we should seek the truth.
But I don't agree with: "  I don't know why people get upset at developments like these. You choose to live in a country then you have to follow the laws.".

Upset

adjective
  1. 1.
    unhappy, disappointed, or worried.

    Why should we not be unhappy because of this sin and injustice? Disappointed with a sense of realization of the blessings and what humanity could have been, is not wrong. With an unrealistic expectation, yes I agree that would not be appropriate. 
    Worried, in one way I understand if we just do what we have to do and do our best and are of that high leveled people, I can see why you would not be worried after that (in regards to some aspects). But is that the case with us individually or as communities? Not at all, most of us by far. 


    Follow the laws; of course. But this is oppression, racist (as per a definition in this Western country I live in), injustice,. We can follow the law but that doesn't mean we can't fight back. In fact, we have to do our responsibly, in this development as well. And there are opportunities we should utilize.  
     
    This is one of the Satanic actions against Islam, Muslims, and humanity. We should care. And especially in this part of the world where they claim to be the champions of human rights, very developed (while others are not), and just and sophisticated.
Edited by Mohammed-Mehdi

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13 hours ago, Reza said:

Anyone know about Austrian (or EU) law?

Courts have proven to not always do what they have to do and sometimes like in Nigeria the ruling of the top-court is being ignored. So even after a good conclusion, it didn't have the impact it should have.

As far as I know, in the EU, this law would have a great chance to be rejected (or so) normally speaking. But I don't believe all these judges are sincere and not corrupt and outside those, we also can see that certain courts/judges can be greatly influenced if the " elite " or someone focuses on a certain outcome.
I would expect Austria to have similar laws or ideas about these matters compared to other Western countries.

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Iran has a compulsory hijab law, KSA also has a dress code for females,in Malaysia there is a law that you cannot enter some government buildings if you are not properly covered up(females). All women, whether local or foreigners are expected to obey these laws. 

Public displays of affection which are a norm in the west are not acceptable in most Muslim countries.A female cannot walk in public in Pakistan wearing a mini skirt or shorts even though it's perfectly okay for her to wear these in a European country.

We expect foreigners living in our country to follow our rules but when we go and live in their for 'better healthcare, education and economy' we start protesting against their laws. 

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If a law is unjust we should all oppose it, no matter where or what law.

So this is the key question here. Is it (un)ethical to have this law or not? Is it just or not? Is it logical? 


If you claim to be champion of human rights, advanced, etc. but then have this law, for what reason again? Why should these Muslim girls not be allowed to weir their scarfs? And even worse; the other religious girls who do show part of the hair are allowed! 
Can anyone come up with a good reason why? 
Just because they don't like the looks of it, is not a valid reason. 


The Burqa as part of an all face-hiding ban, could perhaps be accepted, in my opinion, for these countries. But see my questions and comments above in regards to this specific
and such bans. 


Furthermore, the reason why some of us are living in these places has nothing to do with it.

 

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1 minute ago, Mohammed-Mehdi said:

If a law is unjust we should all oppose it, no matter where or what law.

What's the criteria for justice here?

1 minute ago, Mohammed-Mehdi said:

Is it (un)ethical to have this law or not? Is it just or not? Is it logical?

There are people from among the Muslims say Hijab makes no sense.You expect non Muslims to find a logic? 

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40 minutes ago, starlight said:

We expect foreigners living in our country to follow our rules but when we go and live in their for 'better healthcare, education and economy' we start protesting against their laws. 

Are you implying Muslim = foreigner in the European context? There a lot of born Muslims in these countries too (and reverts). Obviously they have a right to protest laws in their own country that target them, just like any other domestic interest group does?

Or should they flee to another country and learn a new language? Which is more practical?

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42 minutes ago, Reza said:

implying Muslim = foreigner in the European context? 

Foreigners = minority religious groups

43 minutes ago, Reza said:

There a lot of born Muslims in these countries too (and reverts). 

As there are born Christians,Hindus and zoroastrians and atheists in Muslim countries but how accepting would we be if they start protesting against for example same sex marriage laws or laws enforcing hijab? 

I get what you are saying and I don't entirely disagree with it. I am just trying to show the other side of the picture.Islamophobia will continue to rise and it would be naive to think the non Muslim countries will stop making these laws because of us protesting. 

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My position is not politically correct but at the end of the day even if we don't like it this is after all the choice of Austrians. But after that I would not accept hypocrisy of people complaining that some Muslim countries have a dress code asking people to respect Islamic norms. 

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Austrian lawmaker wears headscarf in protest at hijab ban (+Video)

http://en.abna24.com/news//austrian-lawmaker-wears-headscarf-in-protest-at-hijab-ban-video_942335.html

May 18, 2019 - 6:31 PM News Code : 942335 Source : Press TVLink: 
 

An Austrian lawmaker has worn a headscarf during her address against a controversial bill that prohibits primary school girls across the country from wearing hijab — Muslim women’s modest clothing. 

Martha Bissmann, an independent MP, covered her hair during a general assembly speech on Friday to protest the measure, saying, "Let's not allow a wedge to be driven between us." 

The ban was approved after lawmakers from Chancellor Sebastian Kurz's ruling conservative People's Party (ÖVP) and the anti-migration Freedom Party (FPÖ) -- who have formed a majority government together -- voted in its favor. Under the new legislation, it would be illegal for Muslim girls under the age of 10 to wear hijab at all primary schools, including private schools. 

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Austrian lawmaker wears headscarf in protest at hijab ban (+Video)

http://en.abna24.com/news//austrian-lawmaker-wears-headscarf-in-protest-at-hijab-ban-video_942335.html

May 18, 2019 - 6:31 PM News Code : 942335 Source : Press TVLink: 
 

An Austrian lawmaker has worn a headscarf during her address against a controversial bill that prohibits primary school girls across the country from wearing hijab — Muslim women’s modest clothing. 

Martha Bissmann, an independent MP, covered her hair during a general assembly speech on Friday to protest the measure, saying, "Let's not allow a wedge to be driven between us." 

The ban was approved after lawmakers from Chancellor Sebastian Kurz's ruling conservative People's Party (ÖVP) and the anti-migration Freedom Party (FPÖ) -- who have formed a majority government together -- voted in its favor. Under the new legislation, it would be illegal for Muslim girls under the age of 10 to wear hijab at all primary schools, including private schools. 

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