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In the Name of God بسم الله

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62:1 Glorifying God is everything in the heavens and everything on Earth; the King, the Most Sacred, the Almighty, the Most Wise.
62:2 He is the One who sent to the gentiles a messenger from among them, to recite to them His revelations, purify them, and teach them the scripture and wisdom. Before this, they had gone far astray.

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14 minutes ago, ChristianVisitor said:

What Bible passage is that from?

Surah al Jumuah of the Qur'an

17 minutes ago, Son of Placid said:

 

62:1 Glorifying God is everything in the heavens and everything on Earth; the King, the Most Sacred, the Almighty, the Most Wise.
62:2 He is the One who sent to the gentiles a messenger from among them, to recite to them His revelations, purify them, and teach them the scripture and wisdom. Before this, they had gone far astray.

Not seen anything about literally "gentiles" in translations.

 

Surah al-Jum’a - Verse 2

هُوَ الَّذِي بَعَثَ فِي الْأُمِّيِّينَ رَسُولًا مِّنْهُمْ يَتْلُو عَلَيْهِمْ آيَاتِهِ وَيُزَكِّيهِمْ وَيُعَلِّمُهُمُ الْكِتَابَ وَالْحِكْمَةَ وَإِن كَانُوا مِن قَبْلُ لَفِي ضَلَالٍ مُّبِينٍ

2. He it is Who sent amongst the unlettered ones a Messenger from amongst themselves to recite unto them His Verses, to foster them and absolve them of polytheism and discord, and teach them the Heavenly Book and Wisdom. And indeed, they had been formerly in manifest error.

This blessed and significant Verse treats of Divine Unity and Attributes as well as the Prophetic Call of the Prophet of the Islamic faith (S) interrelated with Divine Might, Wisdom, and Holiness, saying that He is the One Who appointed a Messenger from amongst the unlettered to recite His Verses unto them and purify them in the light of the recitation of these Verses from any kind of polytheism, error, and corruption and also teach them the Book and Wisdom, though they were formerly in manifest error.

It is worthy of note that the Prophetic Call, whose characteristics may not be interpreted but through inimitability reflect Divine Glory and Existence, saying that God Almighty is the One Who appointed the Messenger (S) and created such masterpiece in the process of Creation.

The Arabic plural noun umiyyin whose singular form is ummi ("unlettered," attributed adjective from the nominal form umm "mother), denoting that the noble Prophet (S) did not receive any schooling but what he learned from his mother.

Some scholars maintain that the word ummi connotes "from Mecca," since Mecca was called "the mother of dwelling places" (umm al-qura). According to a tradition narrated from Imam Sadiq (عليه السلام), the people of Mecca had neither Scriptures nor a Divinely appointed leader, hence the designation ummi was Divinely attributed to them.13

It is noteworthy that the blessed Verse is saying that the Noble Prophet of the Islamic faith (S) is from the same unlettered people such that the significance and greatness of his Prophetic Call be reflected and it may also demonstrate the veracity of his Call, since the Holy Qur’an, a Book with such profound and great contents and an exalted culture like the Islamic culture may not be the fruit of human thought, let alone an unlettered person who had not received any formal education.

The Light shines from the shadows. It is a verdant and luxurious orchard in the heart of the desert. It is a plain miracle and a manifest proof reflecting the veracity of his Call.

The blessed Verse in question summarizes the goal of the Prophetic Call in three sections: one is of the preliminary aspect, namely the recitation of Divine Verses; the two other sections, I.e. purification of the soul and teaching the Book and Wisdom constitute two great final goals.

The Noble Messenger of Allah (S) was appointed to foster and educate people in terms of knowledge, ethics, and practice such that by means of the two wings, they may soar into the sky of happiness and proceed on the path toward Allah and attain to proximity with Him. It is also worthy of note that three out of four Qur’anic Verses give the precedence to self purification and one Verse gives the precedence to teaching over fostering good qualities.

The point reflects that the two affect each other. Ethics is gendered by knowledge in the same manner that knowledge is gendered by ethics. The point refers to the originality of fostering good qualities. It is noteworthy, however, that rue sciences are hereby intended rather than those in the attire of sciences.14

The difference between the Book and Wisdom may be in that the former implies the Holy Qur’an and the latter alludes to the sayings and teachings of the Noble Prophet (S) termed as sunna ("tradition"). The word Book may also connote Islamic Injunctions and Wisdom may make a reference to its philosophy and secrets.

The phrase

"manifest error"

tersely alludes to the Arabs in pre-Islamic times and the error that had cast its shadow on their societies. They were in plain error since they fashioned idols out of stone and wood and resorted to such inanimate objects in time of need. They interred their daughters alive and even took pride in such villainy saying that thus they did not let aliens lay their hands on them.

Their worshipping rituals included clapping and whistling around the House of Ka‘ba which was even circumambulated by stark naked women. All kinds of superstitions prevailed over their thought.

They took pride in waging war and shedding blood and plunder and regarded women as worthless merchandise on whom they gambled. Women were deprived of the most basic human rights. Hatred and enmity passed from fathers to their children as a consequence of which shedding blood and slaughter were quite common.

The Noble Prophet (S) came unto them and delivered them out of the shadows of error through the Book and Wisdom. Educating such people and saving them from error and leading them unto the Straight Path is one of the glories of the Islamic faith and one of the manifest miracles of our eminent Prophet (S).

https://www.al-Islam.org/enlightening-commentary-light-holy-Qur'an-vol-18/surah-al-juma-chapter-62

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1 hour ago, Propaganda_of_the_Deed said:

Not seen anything about literally "gentiles" in translations.

I'm not sure which version you are using. I think it's safe to call it a version rather than a translation.

Khalifa says gentiles, Pickthall, Sherali, and Yusufali use the word unlettered. Shakir mentions Mecca. but none of these go into expanded detail.

Some say to teach them, "the book", the others say "scriptures", yours' is the only time I've seen "Heavenly book" which, of course, would imply the revelation of the Qur'an, which was not yet available, so what scriptures?. Not a lot of love for Jews in this Surah. I'm not aware of any time Muhammad took the time to teach Jews anything. There are a few mentions of contact, or confront, but no mention of anything more than a fleeting conversation.

It's also the only version I've seen where "polytheism" is used. I don't see that in direct translation from the Arabic into English either. The word is simply not there. It begs the question, Why is it there in this version?

The sermon on the mount is an example of a messenger teaching the Jews. I'm not aware of anyone else trying. Whatever/whomever...it didn't work.

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Goy (/ɡɔɪ/, Hebrew: גוי, regular plural goyim /ˈɡɔɪ.ɪm/, גוים or גויים) is the standard Hebrew biblical term for a nation.[1] The word nation has been the common translation of the Hebrew goy or ethnos in the Septuagint, from the earliest English language bibles such as the 1611 King James Version[2] and the 1530 Tyndale Bible,[3] following the Latin Vulgate which used both gentile (and cognates) and nationes. The term nation did not have the same political connotations it entails today.[4][5] The word "gentile" is a synonym for the Hebrew word Nokri (Hebrew: נָכְרִי) which signifies "stranger" or "non-Jew".

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Guest kman

I'm just a layman, but it comes off to me as referring to all the Prophets and their respective Holy Books.

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14 hours ago, Son of Placid said:

Khalifa says gentiles, Pickthall, Sherali, and Yusufali use the word unlettered. Shakir mentions Mecca. but none of these go into expanded detail.

Scholars are not really agreed on the meaning of the word "Ummi," which is used here in the plural.

Sunni scholars generally thought it meant "unlettered."

Shia scholars, I think, thought it referred to the Prophet being from the city.

Translators wrote whatever they thought met with their understanding.

I think Muslims had not bothered to ask the Prophet the meanings of many verses and so when they were left to figure it out on their own, they were confounded,

As you are aware, there was a problem with the leadership after the Prophet's death, so some may have avoided asking too many questions of Imam Ali, the most knowledgeable of them all, until he became caliph, which was some 35 years later. 

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