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In the Name of God بسم الله
Hassu93

50+ Killed and Over 20 seriously injured after 2 mosques were attacked in Christchurch

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On 3/21/2019 at 4:06 AM, Shiawarrior313 said:

It's gotta make you wonder why it's not making all the headlines.........:cryhappy:

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A lot of rose-tinted glasses with this incident. Certainly a good example of Ordo Ab Chao in motion. NZ holding a gun conference the day before the shooting and then passing legislation the day after the incident, hmm...almost as if the shooting was a demonstration to rationalize to the public their new legislation? 

A lot of censorship I see around this issue, a lot of stronger antimuslim ("Islamophobic") sentiment from certain camps, a lot of long-drawn-out national interest in this single event when Muslims are killed frequently by certain sides favored by the Media, now suddenly everyone else is trying to virtue-signal by pretending they care about Islam to get attention. 

The murders were horrific and it is indeed a tragedy but as a Westerner, I will continue to take the mainstream Media's stance with less than a grain of salt. 

This whole thing, a good fortnight later doesn't show any signs of adding up on my "Logic scale". 

Edited by HakimPtsid

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On 3/22/2019 at 1:42 PM, Ashvazdanghe said:

She isn't  a good leader but she reacted as a normal human in his position but people surprised by a normal behavior  from her in comparison to other Christian leaders but her history before attack is like as other normal leaders 

Its great leadership.   Treating citizens of your country who don't share you're religion, as though they're your own people.   That's part of great leadership.

She didn't react as what you call a normal human being.  When Christians or Jews (Or anyone non Muslim) were massacred,  how many normal people or leaders did what she did who were Muslim in our times ?  The answer is not many, in fact much of the time unfortunately those such "Muslim" leaders  were part of the problem.  

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Under the radar : Unmasking the christchurch shooter | Trailaer coming soon

 

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Guest Concerned Citizen

Time has passed and I’m still in shock about this news. The Muslim ummah needs to come together and support each other.

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Live from Al Noor Mosque in christchurch (2 days ago after attack)

 

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Part 1 christchurch in New Zealand Terror .Christian is terrorist (for deaf )

 Part 2

Christchurch Mosque reopens forprYer after terror attack | Mewshub

Manchester man stands outside local mosque in display of unity

Haka for hope memorial in christchurch

Famous E’gg Boy’ speaks out 

 

Edited by Ashvazdanghe

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Eye witnesses interviews live from Linwood mosque , christchurch part 1 of 2

Part 2 of 2

 

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Why? Why did an Australian man travel to New Zealand and attack and murder innocent Muslims? 

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1 hour ago, Hameedeh said:

Why? Why did an Australian man travel to New Zealand and attack and murder innocent Muslims? 

I think because Australian Muslim community dominated by Wahhabist & they would attack him in response but New Zealand Muslims are just peaceful refugees from countries like as Palestine & Australians consider Newzealand as their backyard that they can do anything there without facing trouble or punishment probably he expected that New Zealand police can’t respond immediately & he could leave country there before their reaction & goes to other country like as Turkey to fulfill his mission there .

Edited by Ashvazdanghe

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16 hours ago, Hameedeh said:

Why? Why did an Australian man travel to New Zealand and attack and murder innocent Muslims? 

 

15 hours ago, Ashvazdanghe said:

I think because Australian Muslim community dominated by Wahhabist & they would attack him in response but New Zealand Muslims are just peaceful refugees from countries like as Palestine & Australians consider Newzealand as their backyard that they can do anything there without facing trouble or punishment probably he expected that New Zealand police can’t respond immediately & he could leave country there before their reaction & goes to other country like as Turkey to fulfill his mission there .

I think also because of one more very important detail, Australia has a TOTAL GUN BAN for almost 20 years, no one can purchase any there. New Zealand unfortunately was (until now) very laid back in their gun laws, so most probably that's why he traveled there and did this horrible massacre there as it was right next door to him. 

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11 hours ago, Kirmani said:

think also because of one more very important detail, Australia has a TOTAL GUN BAN for almost 20 years, no one can purchase any there. New Zealand unfortunately was (until now) very laid back in their gun laws, so most probably that's why he traveled there and did this horrible massacre there as it was right next door to him. 

Salam ,it can be one of reasons but also New Zealand Muslim community are from peaceful Muslims that run away from war & extremism & islamophobia but in other hand Muslim community in Australia is under affection of Wahabi /Salafis that are supporting by KSA & Shia community misrepresenting by people like as Mr.. Tawhidi that islamophobs in Australia are backing him 

Australian Sheikh: everyone would be safe under Sharia’s because people would fear Allah’s punishment 

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12 hours ago, Kirmani said:

Australia has a TOTAL GUN BAN for almost 20 years, no one can purchase any there. New Zealand unfortunately was (until now) very laid back in their gun laws, so most probably that's why he traveled there and did this horrible massacre there as it was right next door to him. 

You might be right. I hope we find out when and where this terrorist bought the gun. If he bought it in Australia then maybe someone could be prosecuted for selling it to him.

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On 4/2/2019 at 1:22 PM, Hameedeh said:

Why? Why did an Australian man travel to New Zealand and attack and murder innocent Muslims? 

I believe he did it because there is evil in the world. This is why there are unwinnable wars. Satan is the enemy of mankind and he knows his time as ruler of this world is very short. Jesus said...

As he sat on the Mount of Olives, the disciples came to him privately, saying, "Tell us, when will these things be, and what will be the sign of your coming and of the end of the age?" And Jesus answered them, "See that no one leads you astray. For many will come in my name, saying, 'I am the Christ,' and they will lead many astray. And you will hear of wars and rumors of wars. See that you are not alarmed, for this must take place, but the end is not yet. For nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom, and there will be famines and earthquakes in various places. All these are but the beginning of the birth pains. "Then they will deliver you up to tribulation and put you to death, and you will be hated by all nations for my name's sake. And then many will fall away and betray one another and hate one another. And many false Prophets will arise and lead many astray. And because lawlessness will be increased, the love of many will grow cold. But the one who endures to the end will be saved. And this gospel of the kingdom will be proclaimed throughout the whole world as a testimony to all nations, and then the end will come. - Matthew 24:3-14

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5 minutes ago, MartyS said:

"See that no one leads you astray. For many will come in my name, saying, 'I am the Christ,' and they will lead many astray. And you will hear of wars and rumors of wars. See that you are not alarmed, for this must take place, but the end is not yet. For nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom, and there will be famines and earthquakes in various places. All these are but the beginning of the birth pains. "Then they will deliver you up to tribulation and put you to death, and you will be hated by all nations for my name's sake. And then many will fall away and betray one another and hate one another. And many false Prophets will arise and lead many astray. And because lawlessness will be increased, the love of many will grow cold. But the one who endures to the end will be saved. And this gospel of the kingdom will be proclaimed throughout the whole world as a testimony to all nations, and then the end will come. - Matthew 24:3-14

hi it's very similar to waht said about Imam Mahdi (aj) , if you just replace 'I am the Christ' with 'I am the Mahdi' rest of it is similar to Shia Narration about him. " 

"Then they will deliver you up to tribulation and put you to death, and you will be hated by all nations for my name's sake." wahabists & Evangelists hate Shias for we use name of Imam Mahdi (aj) 

 

" And many false Prophets will arise and lead many astray." already many false Mahdi(s) are arising even in Iran we had one previous year that introduced himself as founder of new martial Arts branch in Iranian media & after gaining a little popularity & collecting fans called himself Mahdi that he arrested by security forces 

"then many will fall away and betray one another and hate one another." its very common between Muslims  too

we see Famine & earthquakes & rest of common words are same as common Shia & Sunni narrations about Imam Mahdi (aj)

 

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41 minutes ago, Ashvazdanghe said:

hi it's very similar to waht said about Imam Mahdi (aj) , if you just replace 'I am the Christ' with 'I am the Mahdi' rest of it is similar to Shia Narration about him. " 

"Then they will deliver you up to tribulation and put you to death, and you will be hated by all nations for my name's sake." wahabists & Evangelists hate Shias for we use name of Imam Mahdi (aj) 

 

" And many false Prophets will arise and lead many astray." already many false Mahdi(s) are arising even in Iran we had one previous year that introduced himself as founder of new martial Arts branch in Iranian media & after gaining a little popularity & collecting fans called himself Mahdi that he arrested by security forces 

"then many will fall away and betray one another and hate one another." its very common between Muslims  too

we see Famine & earthquakes & rest of common words are same as common Shia & Sunni narrations about Imam Mahdi (aj)

 

Hi. Thank you. That is very interesting. But perhaps we should not be surprised. We are all children of Abraham. Of course, I am the least entitled to that claim, for I am of gentile descent, grafted into God's Kingdom by grace. And I believe the era of the gentiles is ended. And the end times are come.

Blessings and peace!

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33 minutes ago, MartyS said:

Hi. Thank you. That is very interesting. But perhaps we should not be surprised. We are all children of Abraham. Of course, I am the least entitled to that claim, for I am of gentile descent, grafted into God's Kingdom by grace. And I believe the era of the gentiles is ended. And the end times are come.

Blessings and peace!

hi the major difference between us is that last Saviour in view point Christians & Jews is from descendants  of Prophet Isac (عليه السلام) but we believe that is from descendants of Prophet Ishmael (عليه السلام) that great sacrifice for us as Shias is Imam Hussain (عليه السلام) that his lineage from Prophet Ishmael/Ismail (عليه السلام) joins to lineage of Prophet Isac (عليه السلام) as descendant  of Saint Peter from mother side in Imam Mahdi (aj) but in Sunni view he is just from lineage of Prophet Ishmael/Ismail (عليه السلام) so they can't accept sacrifice of Imam Hussain (عليه السلام) also as Muslims they  believe it's not from lineage of Prophet Isac (عليه السلام)

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21 hours ago, Ashvazdanghe said:

hi the major difference between us is that last Saviour in view point Christians & Jews is from descendants  of Prophet Isac (عليه السلام) but we believe that is from descendants of Prophet Ishmael (عليه السلام) that great sacrifice for us as Shias is Imam Hussain (عليه السلام) that his lineage from Prophet Ishmael/Ismail (عليه السلام) joins to lineage of Prophet Isac (عليه السلام) as descendant  of Saint Peter from mother side in Imam Mahdi (aj) but in Sunni view he is just from lineage of Prophet Ishmael/Ismail (عليه السلام) so they can't accept sacrifice of Imam Hussain (عليه السلام) also as Muslims they  believe it's not from lineage of Prophet Isac (عليه السلام)

Hi. Thank you. That is very interesting to me. I knew that Ishmael and Isaac were brothers, each of them the father of a great nation. I don't exclude any of their descendants--or even Gentiles by faith and fear of God--from God's promise of salvation. Therefore, I believe we are meant to be brothers. I get my understanding from these verses in the Old Testament and the New Testament:

The sons of Abraham: Isaac and Ishmael. - 1 Chronicles 1:28

You are the sons of the Prophets and of the covenant that God made with your fathers, saying to Abraham, 'And in your offspring shall all the families of the Earth be blessed.' - Acts 3:25

"Brothers, sons of the family of Abraham, and those among you who fear God, to us has been sent the message of this salvation." - Acts 13:26

Know then that it is those of faith who are the sons of Abraham. And the Scripture, foreseeing that God would justify the Gentiles by faith, preached the gospel beforehand to Abraham, saying "In you shall all the nations be blessed." So then, those who are of faith are blessed along with Abraham, the man of faith. - Galatians 3:7-9

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Photos: UN Chief visits Christchurch mosque

http://en.abna24.com/news//photos-un-chief-visits-christchurch-mosque_941420.html

May 14, 2019 - 7:51 PM News Code : 941420 Source : ABNA24Link: 

 

United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres aims to draw up a global plan to fight a rising tide of hate speech, he said on Tuesday, during a visit to a New Zealand mosque where dozens of worshippers were killed in a mass shooting in March.

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Edited by Ashvazdanghe

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Who is Hussain 

Auckland hold a vigil to honour victims 

https://youtu.be/RkLzB0uM68w

Auckland and christchurch show 

https://youtu.be/QQixMa3rMWQ

Edited by Ashvazdanghe

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So far here's how I've come to dig up the information when commemorating the victims of the New Zealand Mosque Shooting,

https://www.insider.com/new-zealand-mass-shooting-victims-2019-3

https://www.theguardian.com/world/ng-interactive/2019/mar/21/christchurch-shooting-remembering-the-victims

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/19/world/Asia/new-zealand-shooting-victims-names.html

 

In case the links don't work, here are the names of the victims of the last two websites in quotes. The first link isn't too critical for commemoration, just an explanation for the investigation team of New Zealand for their information about the victims along with the vicinity.

The Guardian (theguardian.com) Link

Quote

Fifty people were killed in the Christchurch mosque shootings on 15 March. The New Zealand prime minister, Jacinda Ardern, has urged the public to speak the names of the victims, but to leave the perpetrator nameless. Below are the names and brief stories of those who have been confirmed dead. The list will be updated as more details are released.
 
Mucaad Ibrahim
“He’s been loved by the community here. It’s been tough days. It’s been really tough days.”

Three-year-old Mucad Ibrahim is the youngest known victim of the attacks. He was at Al Noor mosque with his father and older brother Abdi when the attack happened. Everyone began to run, and Abdi thought his father had Mucad. In the rush and crush of people, the three became separated. On Sunday, Abdi said police had confirmed his death. “My mum, she’s been struggling,” Abdi said. “Every time she sees other people crying, emotional, she just collapses.” Ahmed Osman, a close family friend, said of Mucad: “He’s been loved by the community here. It’s been tough days. It’s been really tough days.”

Haji-Daoud Nabi
“He jumped in the firing line to save somebody else’s life and he has passed away.”

Seventy-one-year-old Haji-Daoud Nabi died as he tried to save the lives of fellow worshippers at Al Noor mosque. Nabi came to New Zealand from Afghanistan in 1977 and was a beloved community leader. His son, Yama al-Nabi, was running late for a meeting with his father at the mosque, and escaped the shooting by minutes. He told assembled media on Saturday that his father “jumped in the firing line to save somebody else’s life”. “He has passed away,” Nabi said.

Husna Ahmed
“She thinks of other people first.”

Husna Ahmed, 44, escaped Al Noor mosque when the shooting began, leading the women out. She went back in to look for her husband, Farid, who uses a wheelchair. She was shot at the gate. Farid survived. Her niece, Nusrat Alam, told al-Jazeera: “She thinks of other people first.” Farid said he did not hate the man who killed her. “Probably he wasn’t loved … I don’t hate him at all,” he told Newshub. “She’s brave, and she gave her life saving others.”

Lilik Abdul Hamid
“He was always making friends with anyone.”

Lilik Abdul Hamid, a father of two, was an engineer for Air New Zealand. He had worked in Christchurch for 16 years. His death was confirmed on Sunday in an official statement from Air New Zealand’s chief executive officer Christopher Luxon. “We never felt alone with his personality, he was always making friends with anyone,” his daughter Zhania Anindya said. “He loves fishing and the outdoors, he's an outdoors guy. Christchurch was just perfect for him.”

Sayyad Milne
“I’ve lost my little boy, he’s just turned 14.”

Fourteen-year-old Sayyad Milne was a keen footballer who was shot at Al Noor mosque while attending Friday prayers, as he did every week. The year 10 student at Cashmere high school had dreamed of being an international footballer one day. His father, John Milne, told New Zealand radio his son had died. “I’ve lost my little boy, he’s just turned 14,” he said. “It’s so hard ... to see him just gunned down by someone who didn’t care about anyone or anything.” His mother, Noraini, managed to escape.

Atta Elayyan
“There is huge hole in our hearts.”

Atta Elayyan, 33, was the goalkeeper of New Zealand’s national men’s futsal team. Elayyan, who had just become a father, was confirmed killed by New Zealand’s football association on Sunday. A Palestinian man who was born in Kuwait, Elayyan was also a popular member of the Christchurch tech industry. He leaves behind his wife Farah and young daughter Aya. “There is huge hole in our hearts,” said teammate Josh Margetts.

Amjad Hamid
“He was well liked for his kindness, compassion and sense of humour.”

Amjad Hamid was a heart doctor who lived in Christchurch and travelled to the small town of Hāwera, 10 hours away by car, every three weeks, to work. The 57-year old had lived in Christchurch for 23 years after leaving Palestine. His death was confirmed by a relative, and by Rosemary Clements, the chief executive of the Taranaki District Health Board. “When he returned to Hāwera hospital he often brought fresh baklava from a bakery in Christchurch for everyone,” Clements said. “He was well liked for his kindness, compassion and sense of humour.”

Ansi Alibava
“The life Ansi and I had together, the plans we made, the family we hoped to build here, all vanished in a moment of senseless anti-immigrant rage.”

25-year old Ansi Alibava was studying her masters. Her death was confirmed by the Indian high commission in New Zealand, and her husband, Abdul Nazer Ponnath Hamsa. He told Stuff: “The life Ansi and I had together, the plans we made, the family we hoped to build here, all vanished in a moment of senseless anti-immigrant rage.”

Ali Elmadani
“He considered New Zealand home.”

Retired engineer Ali Almadani came to New Zealand from the United Arab Emirates in 1998. His daughter, Maha Elmadani, is a Christchurch-based graphic designer, and told news site Stuff.co.nz that her father had died on Friday. “He considered New Zealand home and never thought something like this would happen here,” she said.

Naeem Rashid
“My brother was a brave man who died to save others.”

Father and son Naeem Rashid and 21-year-old Talha Naeem were both killed on Friday. Pakistan’s foreign affairs minister tweeted that the pair were confirmed killed. Footage showed Naeem attempting to wrest the gun from the attacker. His brother Khurshid told the Washington Post: "My brother was a brave man who died to save others."

Talha Naeem
“My son and my husband are heroes.”

Father and son Naeem Rashid and 21-year-old Talha Naeem were both killed on Friday. Pakistan’s foreign affairs minister tweeted that the pair were confirmed killed. “My son and my husband are heroes,” his mother Ambreen said

Khaled Mustafa
“They were just looking for a safe place.”

Syrian refugee Khaled Mustafa had survived civil war and atrocities in Syria before he was killed on Friday in the terrorist attack. Ali Akil, a spokesman for the group Syrian Solidarity New Zealand said Mustafa’s wife confirmed he had been killed. “[They] survived atrocities” and “arrived here in a safe haven only to be killed in the most atrocious way,” said Akil. “They were just looking for a safe place.”

Hamza Mustafa
“He was a great student, a compassionate young man.”

Khaled’s son Hamza also died. The 16-year old was in year 10 and had only arrived in New Zealand months ago, with his family. His death was confirmed by his mother, and by the principal of Cashmere high school. “He was a great student, a compassionate young man,” principal Mark Wilson said.

Linda Armstrong
“Linda had a huge heart and was willing to help out anyone who needed it.”

Linda Armstrong, 65, worked with refugees and attended mosque every Friday. Her nephew Kyron Gosse told CNN she was from west Auckland originally, and had moved to Christchurch to be closer to her daughter and granddaughter. “Linda had a huge heart and was willing to help out anyone who needed it,” Armstrong's family said in a statement. “She befriended many travelers, immigrants and refugees. Opening her home, her heart and her kitchen.”

Farhaj Ahsan
“A very nice gentleman.”

The Indian national had moved from Hyderabad 10 years ago and worked as an electrical engineer. “Nobody was imagining in New Zealand – which is a peace-loving country – such [a] situation arises,” his father Sayeeduddin told the BBC. “He was definitely a very nice gentleman,” his uncle, Idris Ansari said. “We are shocked.”

Syed Jahandad Ali
“Our much-loved colleague Syed Ali has lost his life.”

Software developer Syed Ali had been a senior figure at IT company Intergen in Christchurch for the past seven years. His colleagues and Pakistan’s foreign ministry confirmed his death on Sunday. “Our much-loved colleague Syed Ali has lost his life,” Intergen CEO Simon Bright said on Sunday.

Hafiz Musa Patel
“A national icon, a recognisable face.”

Hafiz Musa Patel was the Imam of the Lautoka Jame mosque in Fiji, visiting Christchurch. His death was confirmed by the president of the Fiji Muslim League on Sunday. His son told Stuff his father was “a national icon, a recognisable face”.

Tariq Omar
“It just doesn't feel real.”

Tariq Omar, 24, was a graduate of Cashmere high school, where Hamza Mustafa and Sayyad Milne also attended. His mother Rosemary dropped him off at the mosque, minutes before the attack began. She told CNN she heard gunshots. “We've just been waiting here. It's dreadful really ... It just doesn't feel real,” she said on the day. Cashmere principal Mark Wilson confirmed on Monday that Omar, along with the two other boys, had died on Friday.

Junaid Ismail
“He was just the kindest, gentlest man.”

36-year old Junaid Ismail ran a dairy – a corner store in Kiwi slang – in Christchurch, which his parents started 31 years ago. He and his twin brother, Zahid, came from India when they were five. Junaid was killed at Al Noor mosque, and the flowers have come in a steady stream to the shop. Tim Matthews, a supplier for the dairy, said he had known the brothers since they were 12. “He was just the kindest, gentlest man,” he said.

Hussein Moustafa
“He died at home.”

70-year old Hussein Moustafa moved to Christchurch 20 years ago from Egypt. His daughter Arwa said he prayed at the same corner of the mosque every week. “He considered New Zealand to be his home and he wanted to be buried there,” she told the NZ Herald. “I’m just glad he died at home. I take solace in knowing he died in his favourite place.”

Zeeshan Raza
“People are struggling to come to grips with what has happened.”

Zeeshan Raza was an engineer who moved to Christchurch from Pakistan in December. His mother and his father had come to visit him in Februrary. They were all killed at Linwood mosque. His sister, Maryam Gul, told Pakistan's deputy high commissioner in New Zealand she wanted the three member hers of her family buried there. The high comissioner said: “People are struggling to come to grips with what has happened.”

Ghulam Hussain
“People are struggling to come to grips with what has happened.”

Ghulam Hussain had come to New Zealand in February to visit his son Zeeshan Raza.

Karam Bibi
“People are struggling to come to grips with what has happened.”

Karam Bibi, had come to New Zealand in February to visit her son Zeeshan Raza.

Hussein Al-Umari
“He saved the lives of those around him.”

35-year old Hussein Al-Umari came to Christchurch from the United Arab Emirates in 1997, with his sister Aya. He loved going on walks and made video blogs every time he went on holiday. Aya confirmed to Australian Associated Press on Monday that Hussein had been killed at Al Noor mosque. Aya said Hussein died trying to tackle the shooter. His mother, Janna Ezat, wrote that he was “one of the first to take a bullet and save the lives of those around him, and helped them to escape”.

Kamel Darwish
“It’s the best place that you can raise your child in.”

38-year old Kamel Darwish, a father of three, had come to New Zealand six months ago from Jordan. He was working on a dairy farm and waiting for his wife and children to come join him. His brother Zuhair and the Palestinian foreign ministry confirmed he had been killed. Zuhair had lived in New Zealand since 2007, and had told Kamel to come. “It’s very hard to live in Jordan and I told him, come here, it’s the best place that you can raise your child in,” he said.

Suhail Shahid
“His daughters were his life.”

Suhail Shahid was an engineer who moved to Christchurch with his wife, Asma, and two daughters, aged two and five. Asma told Stuff “his daughters were his life”.

Abdelfattah Qasem
“An elder for the community.”

Abdelfattah Qasem moved to New Zealand in the 1990s after the first Gulf War, and had just moved to Christchurch. He was due to be a grandfather next month. His relatives and the Palestinian foreign ministry confirmed his death. The brother-in-law of Qasem's daughter, Dr.. Mustafa Al-Asaad, told Stuff he was "an elder for the community”.

Arifbhai Vora
“A very heavy heart.”

Arif Vora, 58, and his son Ramiz, 28, were both killed at Al Noor mosque. Ramiz had just had a daughter a week before the shooting, relatives told Stuff. The Indian high commission in New Zealand said they mourned the death of the father and son “with a very heavy heart”.

Ramiz Vora
“A very heavy heart.”

Ramiz had just had a daughter a week before the shooting, relatives told Stuff.

Haroon Mahmood
“A very, very gentle, good person.”

Dr.. Haroon Mahmood was an academic who tutored and lectured in economics at a range of universities in Christchurch. He is survived by his wife and two children. “He was a very, very gentle, good person,” said his colleague Sueann Wang.

Syed Areeb Ahmed
“He had only started his career.”

27-year old Syed Areeb Ahmed moved to New Zealand from Karachi in Pakistan 18 months ago to work as an accountant at PriceWaterhouseCoopers, and send money back home. “He had only started his career,” his uncle, Muhammad Muzaffar Khan said.

Mohsin Al-Harbi
“A kind and caring Kiwi.”

63-year-old Mohsin Mohammed Al-Harbi had lived in New Zealand for 25 years and was a part-time Imam, sometimes delivering the Friday sermon. He worked in water desalination. His wife, Manal, had a heart attack while searching for him following the shooting and had to go to hospital. He was one of the first five victims whose identity was confirmed by New Zealand police. His employer, Showerwell Home Products, wrote that he was “a real character and a kind and caring Kiwi”.

Ahmed Gamal Eldin Mohammed Abdel Ghany
"A great man with the purest of hearts."

Ahmed Gamal Eldin Mohammed Abdel Ghany, 58, was a dual citizen of Egypt and New Zealand. He was killed at Al Noor mosque. His son said he was "a great man with the purest of hearts". "He was kind, gentle, compassionate, generous and extremely loving to all those around him."

Abdukadir Elmi
"My father survived through civil war."

Abdukadir Elmi, 65, was a father of four from Somalia. He was killed at the Al Noor mosque. His son told the Washington Post: "I never thought this kind of stuff would happen to him in New Zealand ... this is devastating. My father survived through civil war."

Osama Adnan Yousef Abukwaik
"He couldn't stop telling me how hospitable the people are."

Palestinian Osama Adnan Yousef Abukwaik, 37, was born in Gaza and immigrated to New Zealand from Egypt following the Arab Spring. He had a masters degree in engineering. His brother told Stuff.co.nz that he was “genuinely in love” with Christchurch and “couldn’t stop telling me how hospitable the people are”. He leaves behind a wife and three daughters.

Muse Nur Awale
Muse Nur Awale, 77, had been living in Christchurch for about 30 years. He was killed at the Al Noor mosque.

Mounir Guirgis Soliman
"A lovely man."

Mounir Guirgis Soliman, 68, had worked as an engineer and quality manager at a local engineering firm since 1997, Stuff.co.nz reported. His death was confirmed by the company, who said he was a “lovely man".

Muhammad Abdus Samad
"We’ve lost another brother in a terrorist attack."

Dr.. Abdus Samad, 66, came to New Zealand from Bangladesh and was a teacher at Lincoln University and according to Stuff.co.nz frequently led prayers at Masjid Al Noor. His son Toha Mohammed confirmed his death on Saturday. His brother, Habibur Rahman, said the family had already lost a brother in the Bangladesh Liberation War. "Now we’ve lost another brother in a terrorist attack,” he said.

Ashraf Ali
""He will always be with me."

58-year-old Ashraf Ali was from Suva in Fiji. He was killed at Al Noor mosque. His brother Ramzan said he spotted Ashraf's body because of the Fijian rugby jersey he was wearing. "He will always be with me," Ramzan said.

Matiullah Safi
"You could always go to him."

Matiullah Safi, 55, came to New Zealand from Afghanistan via India around 2010 and is survived by his wife and seven children. His nephew, Harry Khan, told Buzzfeed News Safi was a “great man”. “You could always go to him," he said. "He always had a smile on his face, he was always at the mosque earlier than anyone, he was staying there, he was helping out with a lot of charities.”

Ashraf El-Moursy Ragheb
54-year-old Ashraf El-Moursy Ragheb moved to New Zealand from Cairo in the 1990s and maintained a dual citizenship with Egypt. He died at Al Noor mosque.

Mohammed Moosid Mohamedhosen
55-year-old Mohammed Moosid Mohamedhosen came to New Zealand from Mauritius. His death was confirmed by New Zealand police.

Dr.. Mojammel Hoq
"This has left a big hole in our hearts.”

Dr.. Mojammel Hoq, 32, had been working as a medical professional in Christchurch for three years. His cousin Adbul Hai told Stuff.co.nz he planned to return home to Bangladesh in September to marry his girlfriend and start a dental clinic. "He was such a nice human being; he was humble and competent," Hai said, "He always appreciated all kinds of people ... [this has] left a big hole in our hearts.”

Ozair Kadir
"Irreplaceable to friends and family."

Ozair Kadir, 24, was a student pilot at the Aviation Academy of New Zealand and moved to Christchurch about 12 months ago. He was originally from India and killed at Al Noor mosque. The Indian Social and Cultural Club of Christchurch described him as "irreplaceable to [his] friends and family".

Muhammad Haziq Mohd-Tarmizi
"A great young man"

Muhammad Haziq Mohd-Tarmizi turned 17 last month and was studying year 12 at Burnside High School. He moved to Christchurch from Malaysia about 18 months ago and was described by his principal as “a great young man who had the respect of his mates and his teachers.". His father, Mohd Tarmizi Shuib, was injured in the attack while his mother and younger brother escaped.

 

The New York Times (nytimes.com) Link

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One was a dairy farmer. Another aspired to be a pilot. One was an elder known for helping newcomers. Another was a teenager who called his mother when the shooting started. The 50 people slaughtered by a gunman at two Christchurch mosques last week spanned a range of backgrounds. Here is what we know about them.

Atta Elayyan

 
 
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ImageAtta Elayyan
Atta ElayyanCreditNew Zealand Football

Atta Elayyan, 33, was a technology entrepreneur, a goalkeeper and a new father. He played for New Zealand’s national futsal team, according to the New Zealand Football association, which confirmed his death. Futsal is a version of five-a-side soccer played indoors.

“There are no words to sum up how we are all feeling,” one of his teammates, Josh Margetts, said in a statement. “There is a huge hole in our hearts as we come to terms with the loss of a great person and a good mate. He will be sorely missed.”

Mr... Elayyan was born in Kuwait and studied computer science at the University of Canterbury. He was the chief executive and a co-founder of LWA Solutions, a mobile app start-up. He was well known in the futsal world and in Christchurch’s tech community.

He and his wife, Farah, have a young daughter, Aya, whose photos appear in abundance on his Facebook page. In one, she is wearing a bib that says: “My dad rocks.”

[We learned more about Mr... Elayyan from his family as they gathered to remember him and say goodbye.]

Mucad Ibrahim

 
 
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ImageMucad Ibrahim
Mucad IbrahimCreditAbdi Ibrahim

Three-year-old Mucad Ibrahim is the youngest person confirmed to have been killed in the attacks. He was at Al Noor mosque and became separated from his brother and father when the shooting began.

“He was a Muslim-born Kiwi who was full of energy, love and happiness,” his family said in a statement. “He is remembered in our community as a young boy who emanated nothing but the representation of God’s love, peace and mercy.”

“Will miss you dearly brother,” Mucad’s brother Abdi Ibrahim wrote on Facebook.

Mucad was wearing a white thobe and his favorite white hat on Friday, “and so returned to His Lord in a state of pure innocence and spiritual beauty,” the family’s statement said.

The family said they had taken solace from a global outpouring of support. “Knowing that New Zealand and the whole world stands behind our boy reassures us that violence and racism are unwelcome in our world,” they said.

Sayyad Milne

 
 
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ImageSayyad Milne
Sayyad MilneCreditCashmere High School Foundation

“I’ve lost my little boy, he’s just turned 14,” Sayyad Milne’s father, John Milne, told The New Zealand Herald through tears.

Sayyad was one of two Cashmere High School students killed in the attack, according to the school’s principal, Mark Wilson. The boy was an avid soccer player.

“He proved himself to be not only a truly outstanding goalkeeper, but a great friend and colleague, a real team player with a fabulous attitude and a warm and friendly personality,” St. Albans Shirley Football Club said in a statement on Facebook.

“Sayyad was one of our own and we will always remember him.”

Lilik Abdul Hamid

 
 
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ImageLilik Abdul Hamid
Lilik Abdul Hamid

Lilik Abdul Hamid, 57, originally from Indonesia, had been an aircraft maintenance engineer with Air New Zealand for 16 years, the company’s chief executive, Christopher Luxon, said in a statement.

“He first got to know the team even earlier when he worked with our aircraft engineers in a previous role overseas,” Mr... Luxon said. “The friendships he made at that time led him to apply for a role in Air New Zealand and make the move to Christchurch.”

Mr... Hamid is survived by his wife and two children, Mr... Luxon said. On Facebook, one of Mr... Hamid’s friends called him “a man with a gold heart who always opened his heart and home to everyone.”

Areeb Ahmed

 
 
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ImageAreeb Ahmed
Areeb AhmedCreditPricewaterhouseCoopers

Areeb Ahmed, 27, was an employee of PricewaterhouseCoopers, a statement released by the company said. Pakistan’s foreign ministry said he was originally from that country’s largest city, Karachi.

“Areeb was a loved and respected member of our PwC family,” the company wrote on Facebook. “His smile, warmth, dedication, respect and humor will be deeply missed.”

Tariq Omar

 
 
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ImageTariq Omar
Tariq OmarCreditChristchurch United Football Club

New Zealand Football confirmed the death of Tariq Omar, 24, a soccer player who coached for several of Christchurch United Football Club’s junior teams. Colin Williamson, the club’s academy director, called him “a beautiful human being with a tremendous heart and love for coaching.”

“Our coaches and his players are struggling to understand what has happened and we are trying to support our club members as best as we can,” Mr... Williamson said in a statement released by the club. “But of course our main thoughts and concerns go out to Tariq’s family who are in our hearts and prayers.”

Shahid Suhail

 
 
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ImageShahid Suhail
Shahid Suhail

Shahid Suhail, 35, from Pakistan, was an engineer who worked for a resin manufacturer in Christchurch, according to Stuff, a news website. He had a wife and two young daughters. “His daughters were his life,” said his wife, Asma.

Syed Jahandad Ali

 
 
 
ImageSyed Jahandad Ali
Syed Jahandad Ali

Syed Jahandad Ali, 34, originally from Lahore, Pakistan, worked at Intergen, a software company and had a wife and three children, according to a fundraising page created by the company. In a statement, the company called him “a kind and gentle man.”

“Syed Jahandad Ali has deeply touched the lives of his friends, colleagues and wider technology community through his knowledge and skills. We are devastated to have lost a very loved Intergenite” the statement read.

Haroon Mahmood

 
 
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ImageHaroon Mahmoud
Haroon Mahmoud

Haroon Mahmood, 40, had worked in banking in Pakistan before moving to New Zealand, Stuff reported. He taught at a private school for international students and had been a tutor at Lincoln University in Christchurch, according to Radio New Zealand. He had a wife and two children.

Farhaj Ahsan

 
 
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ImageFarhaj Ahsan
Farhaj Ahsan

Farhaj Ahsan, 30, originally from Hyderabad, India, had lived for 10 years in New Zealand, where he worked as an electrical engineer. He left a wife and two children, according to his brother, Kashif Ahsan, who spoke to the BBC.

Maheboob Khokhar

Maheboob Khokhar, a 65-year-old Indian engineer, was on his first trip to New Zealand, visiting his son, who had moved there from India eight years ago.

His wife, Akhtar Khokhar, said they had been in the country for two months. He was at Al Noor mosque the day before they had planned to leave.

Muhammad Haziq Mohd-Tarmizi

 
 
Muhammad-Haziq-Mohd-Tarmizi-articleLarge
ImageMuhammad Haziq Mohd-Tarmizi
Muhammad Haziq Mohd-Tarmizi

Muhammad Haziq Mohd-Tarmizi, a Malaysian 17-year-old, was among those killed at Al Noor Mosque, the police said. His father was wounded in the attack, according to the Malaysian government.

Asif Vora

Asif Vora was among five Indian nationals whose deaths were confirmed by the Indian High Commission in New Zealand. Radio New Zealand said he was 58, and that he and his son had been killed at Al Noor mosque.

Ramiz Vora

Asif Vora’s son, Ramiz Vora, 28, had become a father just days before his death, according to Radio New Zealand.

Ansi Alibava

 
 
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ImageAnsi AliBava
Ansi AliBava

Ansi Alibava, 25, another of the Indian nationals among the victims, had moved to New Zealand with her husband, Abdul Nazer, in 2018, a year after they had married, he told CNN. She had just completed a master's degree in agribusiness management.

Mr... Nazer was near an emergency door at Al Noor mosque when the shooting began and managed to escape. Outside, he saw Ms. Alibava lying facedown and ran to her, but was stopped by a police officer.

“She had so many dreams,” he told CNN.

Ozair Kadir

 
 
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ImageOzair Kadir
Ozair KadirCreditInternational Aviation Academy of New Zealand

Ozair Kadir, 25, dreamed of being a commercial pilot like his older brother. Originally from Hyderabad, India, he had moved to New Zealand in recent years and was set to make that a reality.

Messages of grief and support for Mr... Kadir’s family poured in on the Facebook page of the International Aviation Academy of New Zealand, where he was in pilot training. Fellow students gathered on Monday to lay flowers at a makeshift memorial.

“Ozair's presence will be sadly missed by all staff and students at the Academy,” the institute said in a statement. “Our love, thoughts and prayers are with his family who are now in New Zealand preparing to take Ozair home.”

Haji Daoud al-Nabi

 
 
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ImageHaji Daoud al-Nabi
Haji Daoud al-Nabi

Haji Daoud al-Nabi, 71, arrived in New Zealand from Afghanistan about 30 years ago and was a central figure in Christchurch’s small Afghan community. He was a leader who welcomed everyone, his son Yama al-Nabi said.

His son was running 10 minutes late for Friday Prayers, along with his 8-year-old daughter, when they came upon a police cordon. The younger Mr... Nabi’s hands trembled as he held up his mobile phone to show a picture of his father with his daughter in the mosque on a different day.

“I thought I’d make it to the prayers. When I got there, the police were there. I was running and a guy said there was shooting in the mosque,” Yama al-Nabi said. He knew his father was inside, but news of his death only came hours later.

Ali Elmadani

Ali Elmadani, 65, immigrated to New Zealand from the United Arab Emirates with his family in 1998, his family confirmed to the Stuff news site. His daughter, Maha Elmadani, said her father had always told the family to be strong, so that was what she was trying to do.

“He considered New Zealand home and never thought something like this would happen here,” she told Stuff.

Husna Ahmad

 
 
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ImageHusna Ahmed
Husna AhmedCreditEdgar Su/Reuters

Husna Ahmad, 47, led a number of women and children to safety after the shooting at Al Noor mosque began, said Farid Ahmad, her husband. Mr... Ahmad, who is in a wheelchair, said she was killed when she returned to the mosque to check on him.

“She was busy with saving lives, forgetting about herself,” said Mr... Ahmad, 59.

Mr... Ahmad said he had forgiven the gunman and believed that good would eventually come from the killing. “This is what Islam taught me,” he said.

“What he did was a wrong thing, but I would tell him that inside him, he has great potential to be a generous person, to be a kind person, to be a person who would save people, save humanity rather than destroying them,” Mr... Ahmad said. “I hope and I pray for him that he would be a great savior one day. I don’t have any grudge.”

Naeem Rashid

 
 
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ImageNaeem Rashid
Naeem Rashid

In the gunman’s self-made video of the killings he had posted to Facebook, a man can be seen trying to tackle him as he began firing in Al Noor mosque. That man was Naeem Rashid, according to witnesses.

His family described him as an intelligent, ambitious and devout father of three. His eldest son, Talha Naeem, was also killed.

Mr... Rashid was in his 40s, according to Stuff and Radio New Zealand. His brothers, interviewed in Pakistan, said he had left a senior position at Citibank in the city of Lahore in 2010 to pursue a doctorate in Christchurch and raise his children in a peaceful country. Starting over proved more difficult than he had expected.

“Like everybody who leaves this country, he left Pakistan because of lack of opportunities here,” said Dr... Khurshid Alam, one of Mr... Rashid’s brothers. “He went there to do his Ph.D. Because of the financial situation, he couldn’t complete it, so he was teaching part-time.”

He became much more devout during his time in New Zealand, according to his brothers. They said he talked about wanting to die a martyr, which he felt was the most honorable way for a Muslim to die.

Talha Naeem

Talha Naeem, 21, had just graduated from college and entered the work force. He was the eldest of Naeem Rashid’s three children — the second is 18, the youngest is 5 — and his father was especially proud of him, according to his family.

The family had planned to return to Pakistan in May to help Talha find a wife.

Amjad Hamid

Amjad Hamid, 57, was a cardiologist who had spent the last few years working with rural communities in the mountainous area of Taranaki, on New Zealand’s North Island, though he continued to live in Christchurch with his wife and family. At Hawera Hospital in Taranaki, he often brought colleagues fresh baklava from a Christchurch bakery.

“He was well liked for his kindness, compassion and sense of humor,” the Taranaki District Health Board said in a statement.“He was a hard-working doctor, deeply committed to caring for his patients, and a thoughtful team member who was supportive of all staff.”

Hi wife, Hanan al-Adem, told Radio New Zealand she still could not believe he was gone.

“He was the perfect man, it’s a big loss,” she said.

Kamel Darwish

Kamel Darwish, 38, arrived early at his brother’s home in Christchurch on the eve of the attack. He had traveled from the countryside, where he worked at a dairy farm, because “he didn’t want to miss Friday prayers,” said his brother, Zuhair Darwish.

New Zealand had been his home for just six months. He had moved from Jordan because his brother had convinced him there was no safer, better place to raise a family. His wife and children were set to arrive in a month.

“He was caring, he was honest, he was a loving person,” his brother said.

Linda Armstrong

 
 
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ImageLinda Armstrong
Linda Armstrong

Linda Armstrong, 64, was a third-generation New Zealander who grew up in Auckland and converted to Islam in her 50s, her nephew Kyron Gosse said.

“Linda had a huge heart and what little she had, she was more than happy to share with her family and Muslim community,” Mr... Gosse wrote in a tribute to his aunt on Facebook. “She would tell me stories about Ramadan when all the families would come together at the mosque sharing homemade meals and having a feast, laughing and chatting.”

Lateef Alabi, a leader at the Linwood mosque, told The New York Times that Ms. Armstrong had been among the victims there. Her younger brother, Tony Gosse, remembered her as a peaceful woman with a “a stubborn ideology of this world.”

“We didn't always see eye to eye but she lived a very humble lifestyle and was always unselfishly helping others. She volunteered at refugee centers and was an advocate for women's rights,” he said. “She always had an open ear and a shoulder to lean on.”

Mohammed Imran Khan

Mohammed Imran Khan, 47, also known as Imran Bhai, was originally from India and was killed at the Linwood mosque, Stuff reported. He owned a restaurant, the Indian Grill, and two other Christchurch businesses. A post on the restaurant’s Facebook page the day after the attacks said it would be closed indefinitely.

Mohammed Moosid Mohamedhosen

Mohammed Moosid Mohamedhosen, 54, a citizen of Mauritius, was killed at the Linwood mosque, the police said.

Hamza Mustafa

 
 
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ImageHamza Mustafa
Hamza MustafaCreditCashmere High School Foundation

Hamza Mustafa, 16, called his mother when the shooting began at Al Noor mosque, she told Stuff.

“He said ‘Mum, there’s someone come into the mosque and he’s shooting us,’” Salwa Mustafa said. “I called ‘Hamza, Hamza,’ and I can hear his little voice and after that it was quiet.”

Hamza Mustafa attended Cashmere High School, as did Sayyad Milne, another teenager killed in the attack.

Khaled Mustafa

 
 
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ImageKhaled Mustafa
Khaled Mustafa

Khaled Mustafa, 44, Hamza Mustafa’s father, was also killed at Al Noor mosque.

Radio New Zealand said the Mustafas were originally from war-ravaged Syria, and that they had moved to New Zealand from Jordan last year. Hamza’s 13-year-old brother Zaed was wounded.

“Our lives have completely changed,” Ms. Mustafa told Stuff.

Junaid Ismail

 
 
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ImageJunaid Ismail
Junaid Ismail

Junaid Ismail, 36, was a Christchurch native who worked at the family business, a dairy, according to Radio New Zealand. He had a wife and three children. His twin brother, Zahid, survived the shooting.

Abdelfattah Qasem

 
 
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ImageAbdelfattah Qasem
Abdelfattah Qasem

Abdelfattah Qasem, a 60-year-old Palestinian, worked in Kuwait for much of his life, Stuff reported. He moved to New Zealand with his family in the early 1990s, after the first Gulf War. A relative told Stuff that Mr... Qasem was “like an elder for the community,” known for helping newcomers to Christchurch. He had three daughters and was about to become a grandfather.

Ashraf Ali

Originally from Fiji, Ashraf Ali, 61, had lived in Christchurch for 17 years, Stuff reported.

Ashraf Ali Razat

Ashraf Ali Razat, 58, was visiting New Zealand from Fiji when he was killed, according to Radio New Zealand.

Mathullah Safi

Mathullah Safi, 55, killed at Al Noor mosque, came to New Zealand from Afghanistan through India about nine years ago, Stuff reported. He was married with seven children.

Hussein Al-Umari

 
 
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ImageHussein Al-Umari
Hussein Al-UmariCreditAya Al-Umari

Hussein Al-Umari, 35, killed at Al Noor mosque, worked in the travel industry but had recently lost his job, his parents told Stuff. The family moved to New Zealand from the United Arab Emirates 22 years ago, according to the news site.

Musa Vali Suleman Patel

Musa Vali Suleman Patel, 60, an Imam in Fiji for about 25 years, had traveled to Australia and then New Zealand to spend time with children and friends, the Fiji Muslim League said in a statement.He “served selflessly as an Imam, teacher, mentor, and was much sought after as a powerful orator and speaker,” the organization said in a statement. He is survived by his wife and five children.

Ashraf al-Masri

Ashraf al-Masri had two young children and worked in a shop, according to Stuff. Police said he was 54 years old and a dual citizen of Egypt and New Zealand.

Hussein Moustafa

Hussein Moustafa, 70, was originally from Egypt, according to Stuff. “He loved the mosque, he loved tidying it, he loved nourishing it and he was always a welcoming face there,” his daughter-in-law, Nada Tawfeek, told the news site.

Mounir Soliman

Mounir Soliman, 68, had been a design engineer and quality manager at Scotts Engineering in Christchurch since 1997, according to Stuff. He was a “lovely man,” said a spokeswoman for the company, Glenda Hillstead. He was married and had no children.

Zeeshan Raza

Zeeshan Raza, 38, a mechanical engineer, moved to New Zealand last year from Karachi, Pakistan, Stuff reported. He and his parents were killed at the Linwood mosque.

Ghulam Hussain

Mr... Raza’s father, Ghulam Hussain, was 66 years old. He and his wife, Karam Bibi, came to New Zealand last month to visit their son, Stuff reported.

Karam Bibi

Ms. Bibi was 63, the police said. She and Mr... Hussain are survived by a daughter, according to Stuff.

Abdukadir Elmi

 
 
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ImageAbdukadir Elmi
Abdukadir Elmi

Abdukadir Elmi, 78, came to New Zealand with his family about 10 years ago, Stuff reported. In a Facebook post, his son, Said Abdukadir, said he was “a giant among his community,” generally known as Sheikh Abdukadir. “Kids would run to grab his chair when they hear the noise of his cane hitting against ground upon his entrance,” he wrote. He is survived by five sons, four daughters and his wife of nearly 50 years, according to Stuff.

Mohsin Al Harbi

Mohsin Al Harbi, 63, had lived for 25 years in New Zealand, where he worked in water desalination. After the shooting, his wife, Manal, was hospitalized with a heart attack while searching for him, Stuff reported.

Osama Adnan Youssef Kwaik

 
 
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ImageOsama Youssef Kwaik
Osama Youssef KwaikCreditYoussef Adnan Kwaik

Osama Adnan Youssef Kwaik, 37, was born in Gaza and raised in Egypt, according to Stuff. A civil engineer, he moved to Christchurch in 2017 and was in the process of applying for New Zealand citizenship. He had a wife and three children, one of whom was born in Christchurch.

His older brother, Youssef Adnan Abu Kwaik, penned a tribute to Osama on Facebook, detailing how he thought Osama had found the safety and security he had desired in New Zealand.

“From the first week, you sounded happy. Those Kiwi guys took you by surprise, didn’t they? I remember when you’d call me to tell me how they smile at you and your family,” he wrote. “It’s been a year and a half since you’ve moved my brother and your calls have started to include names of friends from work, neighbors and the community. You found the home you were looking for.”

Mojammel Hoq

Mojammel Hoq, 30, moved to New Zealand from Bangladesh a few years ago and was studying in Christchurch, according to Radio New Zealand.

Mohammed Omar Faruk

Mohammed Omar Faruk, 36, was a welder who came to New Zealand from Bangladesh about two years ago, a friend told Stuff. His pregnant wife remained in Bangladesh, the friend said.

Muhammed Abdusi Samad

Muhammed Abdusi Samad, 66, from Bangladesh, was a lecturer at Lincoln University who often led prayers at Al Noor mosque, Stuff reported.

Muse Nur Awale

Muse Nur Awale, 77, had been living in Christchurch for about 30 years, Stuff reported. He was married and had no children.

Ahmed Gamaluddin Abdel-Ghany

 
 
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ImageAhmed Gamaluddin Abdel-Ghany
Ahmed Gamaluddin Abdel-Ghany

Ahmed Gamaluddin Abdel-Ghany, 68, emigrated from Egypt with his wife and son in 1996, Stuff reported. His son, Omar, called him “a great man with the purest of hearts” in an Instagram post.

Zakaria Bhuiya

 
 
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ImageZakaria Bhuiya
Zakaria Bhuiya

Zakaria Bhuiya was a welder originally from Bangladesh. He had recently married a woman from his home country and was waiting for a visa so she could join him in New Zealand, according to Reuters. Mr... Bhuiya worked for AMT Mechanical Services, which said in a statement that he had taken the day off to celebrate his 33rd birthday at the mosque.

“Zakaria was a respected member of our team and a dear friend of ours,” the company said in a statement posted on a fund-raising page for Mr... Bhuiya’s wife.

Jamie Tarabay, Damien Cave, Jon Hurdle and Charlotte Graham-McLay contributed reporting from Christchurch, New Zealand. Meher Ahmad contributed reporting from Lahore, Pakistan.

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Correction: March 21, 2019

An earlier version of this article, relying on information from authorities in New Zealand, erroneously included an individual among the victims who were killed in the attack. That profile has been removed.

Megan Specia is a story editor on the International Desk, specializing in digital storytelling and breaking news. @meganspecia

 

May Allah shed mercy upon them and upon those who not only believe in Him, but have faith in Him.

Edited by ZethaPonderer
Adding furthermore in italics

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