Jump to content
Guests can now reply in ALL forum topics (No registration required!) ×
Guests can now reply in ALL forum topics (No registration required!)
In the Name of God بسم الله
Sign in to follow this  
notme

Ten most dangerous places to be a woman

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

Highlights:

More than half of ten worst list is Sunni majority countries.

United States is the only "Western" "first world" country on the list.

Several of the list are currently or recently engaged in war.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-women-dangerous-poll-factbox/factbox-which-are-the-worlds-10-most-dangerous-countries-for-women-idUSKBN1JM01Z

 

Any insights from people who have lived in these places? Would you say this list is generally accurate? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The list is inconsistent, it confuses rights with danger. Saudi women are generally safe from crime and assault, and are usually tied in the house to their rich husband. They are usually housewives, and I doubt they want to change that.

If your husband is rich and pays for everything, then I'm sure you're happy, and that's what I have heard from my interactions with Saudis. However, there are poor Saudis - especially Shi'a ones - so maybe there is some truth to that article.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I have lived in Pakistan and few women live like queens and they have so much power, but for majority of women, it's very dangerous place. I don't even want to go visit, because I am scared I will be forced to marry someone. I hope that my parents don't spend their old age in Pakistan, otherwise I will need to make very tough choices: my safety or my duties towards my parents. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Sumerian said:

Saudi women are generally safe from crime and assault, and are usually tied in the house to their rich husband.

Surely everyone in the country can't be rich, nor even half of everyone! I'm guessing the study included everyone who lives there, not just citizens. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, notme said:

Surely everyone in the country can't be rich, nor even half of everyone! I'm guessing the study included everyone who lives there, not just citizens. 

Oh, there are countries where all the citzens are practically rich, like Qatar.

But of course the migrant workers from third world nations who make up a sizable if not a majority of the population are treated like slaves, which is sad.

Edited by Sumerian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, notme said:

Any insights from people who have lived in these places? Would you say this list is generally accurate? 

There have been lot of unpleasant incidents happened against women in the past, which shames every Indian which should be outright condemned. However, these has happened mostly in rural areas or less developed states. Urbanization is taking place faster than before which in a way decreases the crimes against women. India can be in top ten but bagging a top position in this category doesn't give bragging rights. The report seems inconsistent with facts.

Quote

The Thomson Reuters Foundation survey of about 550 experts on women’s issues ranked war-torn Afghanistan and Syria in second and third place, with Somalia and Saudi Arabia next.

550 peoples opinion will decide or the actual facts and figures would. Take another batch of 550 and you may get different results.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Shi3i_jadeed said:

Its mustahab that women don't leave the house expect for necessities. Its sad that women are forced in many places to work nowadays.

But staying inside and alone is miserable for many people. I'll agree that it's sad that women are often forced to work, but they shouldn't fear going out to work or volunteer in their communities if that's what they choose to do.

 

4 minutes ago, Shi3i_jadeed said:

I think the shari' punishment should be applied to rapists which is death. 

I'll agree with this wholeheartedly and unreservedly. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, notme said:

Highlights:

More than half of ten worst list is Sunni majority countries.

United States is the only "Western" "first world" country on the list.

Several of the list are currently or recently engaged in war.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-women-dangerous-poll-factbox/factbox-which-are-the-worlds-10-most-dangerous-countries-for-women-idUSKBN1JM01Z

Every country is a dangerous place for women, according to news reports and crime statistics, but those 10 countries are definitely the worst ones. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, notme said:

Any insights from people who have lived in these places? Would you say this list is generally accurate? 

Hard to say if its accurate. For example, a woman could easily get harassed in public all over India while in their private spheres they are secure; in Afghanistan public harassment is very rare for women who adhere to social conventions but the violence and abuse we hear about mostly occur in private spheres...40 years of war is bound to wear people down psychologically.  So a woman can be insecure in public all over India, violence and abuse against women does not occur all over Afghanistan. 

In case of Afghanistan a big majority of violence occur in Sunni communities. Shia women are far more educated, aware, involved in public life, independent, and intellectually more secure. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, notme said:

But staying inside and alone is miserable for many people. I'll agree that it's sad that women are often forced to work, but they shouldn't fear going out to work or volunteer in their communities if that's what they choose to do.

Whether they personally like it or not doesn't change that it is mustahab. Its not wajib, you are free to not do something mustahab. Obviously women shouldn't be in fear if they go out. I just dont like that many modern women don't have a choice in the matter especially when it leads to her primary duty of motherhood being neglected. 

4 hours ago, shiasoldier786 said:

According to who? 

Ayatollahs Khomeini, Khoie, Araki, Muhsin al hakim, muhammad shirazi, muhammad saeed al hakeem and others. There are ahadith about it in wasail ashia and al kafi. By the chapter heading obviously shaykh hurr al amili believed it too. 

Chapter heading in arabic is

ـ باب استحباب حبس المرأة في بيتها أو بيت زوجها فلا تخرج لغير حاجة ولا يدخل عليها أحد من الرجال

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am surprised that Saudi Arabia, US and Pakistan/India are considered worse for women than African countries or Mexican countries. I have read a lot of scary articles about MS-13 gang, and watched documentaries about african countries. I think that Mexican and African countries have more poverty and less education and those two things mean bad news for women. Conditions must be worse for women in those countries, especially compared to US. 

Edited by rkazmi33

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, rkazmi33 said:

Conditions must be worse for women in those countries, especially compared to US

I would expect so too, that's why I posted. But last statistic I heard a while back, 1 in 4 women in the US are sexually assaulted or raped at some time in their lives. I don't know how they get this statistic because the majority are unreported. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, notme said:

I would expect so too, that's why I posted. But last statistic I heard a while back, 1 in 4 women in the US are sexually assaulted or raped at some time in their lives. I don't know how they get this statistic because the majority are unreported. 

They probably get these statistics by anonymous poles and I think women in US are more likely to admit they were assaulted or raped. In other cultures, women are not likely to admit about sexual assaults even in online anonymous polls. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Reza said:

México is one country. You mean Latin America? Some parts are very poor and dangerous, other parts are better, and are considered emerging economies.

Yes I meant Latin America. I had to work with people from that culture at different places and their men look at women in the same way desi men look at women. That's why I find it hard to believe that sexual violence is not a problem there. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, notme said:

I would expect so too, that's why I posted. But last statistic I heard a while back, 1 in 4 women in the US are sexually assaulted or raped at some time in their lives. I don't know how they get this statistic because the majority are unreported. 

Is it reliable?! 1 in 4 is too much!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, notme said:

I would expect so too, that's why I posted. But last statistic I heard a while back, 1 in 4 women in the US are sexually assaulted or raped at some time in their lives. I don't know how they get this statistic because the majority are unreported. 

A Department of Justice report "Rape and Sexual Assault Victimization Among College-Age Females, 1995–2013" mentions the reasons that college age females did not report a rape or sexual assault victimization to the police:

  • police would not or could not do anything to help 
  • reported to a different official 
  • the victimization was not important enough to report 
  • believed the incident was a personal matter 
  • fear of reprisal 

https://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/rsavcaf9513.pdf

Perhaps "personal matter" was feeling shame about what happened and not willing to tell anyone else. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, shadow_of_light said:

Is it reliable?! 1 in 4 is too much!!

1 in 7.5 billion is too much! 

I don't know how they came up with this statistic. People don't really discuss these things openly, so I can't say whether it's reasonable or not. I can say that very nearly 100% of enlisted women in the US military endure sexual harassment, assault, or rape, and it is almost never prosecuted. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why am I not surprised by USA.........this is what oversexualization and objectification and free mixing AND lack of honor (or as the Turks call it, namus) does. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/29/2018 at 2:46 PM, Sirius_Bright said:

 550 peoples opinion will decide or the actual facts and figures would. Take another batch of 550 and you may get different results.

Yes, if you pick and choose which 550 people you interview, you might get a different response. But assuming you randomly choose your 550 people, there's a high likelihood that you've got a diverse group and statistically you're approaching a true average of opinion.  However if, in general, the entire population of experts interviewed have a skewed opinion, then you're always going to have a skewed opinion, but a random selection would still yield the average opinion.

On 6/29/2018 at 4:04 PM, Shi3i_jadeed said:

Its mustahab that women don't leave the house expect for necessities. 

That's dumb.  Why not just call women servants then, or house slaves?

22 hours ago, rkazmi33 said:

I am surprised that Saudi Arabia, US and Pakistan/India are considered worse for women than African countries or Mexican countries. I have read a lot of scary articles about MS-13 gang, and watched documentaries about african countries. I think that Mexican and African countries have more poverty and less education and those two things mean bad news for women. Conditions must be worse for women in those countries, especially compared to US. 

Those articles/documentaries were likely written for the purpose of pushing a dramatic narrative to draw in viewers/readers.  Pockets of gang violence exist everywhere, some neighborhoods are more crime ridden than others, but the majority of places just have people going about their business.  And plus, perspective matters a lot.  In a place like a third world country that's at war, or where there is limited effective government/or a corrupt one, there's a reasonable expectation that things will be less safe.  As you get more developed, the expectation is for less and less crime.  Where as 1 robbery a week might be considered too much in a 3rd world country, 1 a month might be considered too much in a developed country.

21 hours ago, notme said:

I would expect so too, that's why I posted. But last statistic I heard a while back, 1 in 4 women in the US are sexually assaulted or raped at some time in their lives. I don't know how they get this statistic because the majority are unreported. 

Well, the definition of sexual assault is changing right?  Before sexual assault was a less graphic way of saying rape.  Now, sexual assault includes an unwanted kiss, or touching, etc.  Later in life, a randomly sampled group, given a list of what constitutes "sexaul assault" will say ,"oh yeah, that happened to me before."  That's irrespective of whether or not, at the time they thought they were being assaulted.

9 hours ago, Sinan said:

Why am I not surprised by USA.........this is what oversexualization and objectification and free mixing AND lack of honor (or as the Turks call it, namus) does. 

Really?  You skip over 9 countries, all of which either include a Muslim majority or a large Muslim population, to say that you're not surprised by number 10?  According to that source a woman is just as likely to face sexual threats in Syria as they are in the US.  Why aren't you talking about the oversexualization and objectification in Syria?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, notme said:

I can say that very nearly 100% of enlisted women in the US military endure sexual harassment, assault, or rape, and it is almost never prosecuted. 

The problem with the enlisted population is very similar to the problem you have on college campuses, but worse.  On college campuses, the schools typically still treat the students like children (separate dorms, strict rules about who is allowed in after curfew, etc).  With enlisted folks, they've got the same raging hormones, arguably more access to alcohol, more freedom in the barracks, and the same immature brain.  And then there's the culture among groups within the military (see Marines United) that women aren't really their equals.  It seems, at least on the surface, that the military is getting more serious about prosecution of these things, but again, lot's of the females don't want to pursue justice because they don't want to be shunned as an outsider.  All that does is make the problem worse, because now people think they can get away with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, coldcow said:

Well, the definition of sexual assault is changing right?  Before sexual assault was a less graphic way of saying rape.  Now, sexual assault includes an unwanted kiss, or touching, etc.

When I was in the army, a man came up to me while I was standing in a crowd reading a notice on a board, and grabbed my behind. I turned to confront him, but he was already hurrying away. I told his squad leader, who laughed it off saying "that's just how he is".

On another occasion a uniformed stranger grabbed me and tried to pull me into a vacant tent. I managed to fight him off and ran away. (All women should learn martial arts.) But do you know how difficult it is to describe an attacker when everyone dresses the same and has the same haircut? He was a white guy, probably about 5'10", average military build, light brown or blonde hair. He wasn't wearing his name tape. That describes a lot of people.

On both of those occasions I definitely felt violated, but at the time only the second seemed like assault - it seemed like attempted rape. The first was just a guy being an immature jerk because he thought it would be funny to see my reaction. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, notme said:

When I was in the army, a man came up to me while I was standing in a crowd reading a notice on a board, and grabbed my behind. I turned to confront him, but he was already hurrying away. I told his squad leader, who laughed it off saying "that's just how he is".

On another occasion a uniformed stranger grabbed me and tried to pull me into a vacant tent. I managed to fight him off and ran away. (All women should learn martial arts.) But do you know how difficult it is to describe an attacker when everyone dresses the same and has the same haircut? He was a white guy, probably about 5'10", average military build, light brown or blonde hair. He wasn't wearing his name tape. That describes a lot of people.

 On both of those occasions I definitely felt violated, but at the time only the second seemed like assault - it seemed like attempted rape. The first was just a guy being an immature jerk because he thought it would be funny to see my reaction. 

Always go for the eyes/face.  Should be easy to identify someone with scratches on their face and cornea.

But like you said, the second one felt like the assault.  And if asked at the time about sexual assault, maybe you would've only thought of the second instance.  But if asked now, you might mention both.  Or, if given a survey that lists "unwanted personal touching" or something to that effect, you'd definitely think of the first instance.  

Was that second instance on a deployment?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, coldcow said:

Was that second instance on a deployment?

Both were. The first was someone I knew, and if I remember correctly, we were still stateside at the time. The second took place in a tent city for people processing through at an intermediate staging base during daylight when most people were working. It was my day off and I was returning from visiting a friend who had loaned me a paperback novel. After that I never cut through tent city alone, I always took the road even though it was at least 10 minutes longer walk. 

The greatest danger to women in the US military is men in the US military. My story is mild compared to many I've heard. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, ali_fatheroforphans said:

No woman is forced to work. The world now just presents a lot of opportunities for women to work if they choose to.

No, some women are forced to work by lazy or greedy husbands or by unfortunate circumstances. And also many women choose to work outside home. Regardless of cause, she should be able to feel safe at work and going to and from her workplace. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, coldcow said:

Looks like a chickflick, so no.

Its fictional, but its all about sexual abuse and rape in highschool environments, among other controversial topics such as suicide and societies approach to these topics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, iCambrian said:

Anyone seen the Netflix show 13 reasons?

I haven't seen it. I rarely have the attention span for shows. But I have read warnings for parents to not let teenagers watch it because it deals with mature and difficult themes that many teens are not ready to handle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/1/2018 at 7:10 AM, coldcow said:

That's dumb.  Why not just call women servants then, or house slaves?

وَمَا كَانَ لِمُؤْمِنٍ وَلَا مُؤْمِنَةٍ إِذَا قَضَى اللَّهُ وَرَسُولُهُ أَمْرًا أَن يَكُونَ لَهُمُ الْخِيَرَةُ مِنْ أَمْرِهِمْ ۗ وَمَن يَعْصِ اللَّهَ وَرَسُولَهُ فَقَدْ ضَلَّ ضَلَالًا مُّبِينًا - 33:36

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...