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Annieboo

1 week language challenge

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Salam ya’all

I have been planning to learn ‘a’ language for almost 2 years (hehe) but never had the motivation:einstein:

sooo I thought it would be a good idea to create a one week language challenge.. if you guys are interested? End of every week we can share our experiences.. and comment every few days on how well we’re doing - which would motivate us to learn more :pushup:

i plan to write sentences (in the language I am yet to decide) on a paper and stick them on the fridge walls etc.This will help me practice words and sentences :) 

You can choose any language you want to learn.

or 

I’ll give you guys a language to learn (maybe few words)?

anyone interested?

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22 minutes ago, just a muslim said:

تعلّمْ لسان القرآن فإنها تنفعك جداً في الدنيا وفي الآخرة

learn the language of the quran for indeed, it will benefit you in the dunya as well as the akhirah.

Ofcourse, no one can deny that,we should all learn Arabic, but there are also many other languages that we can learn and can benefit others. We could also learn Farsi, pushto, Swedish etc.. you should learn languages as many as you can, so that you can help the Islamic cause and spread the message in another language.

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26 minutes ago, Haimid said:

Assalam.

i would recommend Persia-Farsi First for a Shia'a especially a revert brother/sister.

Allah knows the Best.

Wassalam.

My list for reverts is

1. Arabic, because it is the language of the Quran and Ahlulbayt (as)

2. Farsi, useful for reading Shia books pertaining to theology, tafsir, irfan and hadith.

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15 minutes ago, Gaius I. Caesar said:

My list for reverts is

1. Arabic, because it is the language of the Quran and Ahlulbayt (as)

2. Farsi, useful for reading Shia books pertaining to theology, tafsir, irfan and hadith.

and thats why you need farsi, because you've no idea how hard it is to learn about quran to mine something new from it, learning arabic after farsi, become to easy:-)

Edited by Haimid

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6 minutes ago, Haimid said:

and thats why you know farsi, because you've no idea how hard it is to learn about quran to mine something new from it, learning arabic after farsi, become to easy:-)

Hmm, good point. I am currently studying German, it has been very interesting and productive since I started taking the class.

Edited by Gaius I. Caesar

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Ok great! So if you have chosen the language you want to learn, then follow these steps (they would help)

- write few sentences on a piece of paper ( in the language you have chosen)

- stick them on the walls (eg: sitting room, kitchen) mostly where you spend your time the most. 

- and keep practicing, keep reading and repeating them all day long 

- end of the day we’ll test ourselves how well we’ve done today

- and then share how much we have learnt on shiachat! :cuddle:

We will carry this on for a week.

So we’re starting today! 

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59 minutes ago, Ibn Al-Ja'abi said:

While learning languages is a great endeavor, you want to make sure you learn in a sustainable and productive way. Simply dedicating a solid week to writing sentences won't be enough. You need to also understand how the individual words in the sentence come together to form the sentence, in other words, learn the grammar of the language, this alongside doing practical learning such as translating, writing sentences, speaking activities, and reading. And you want to actually create a schedule and stick to it, that means studying the language a certain amount of times a week -- preferably daily -- and consistently sticking to it. That means you should also pick a language you're interested in because you'll  need to keep motivation up, especially during the moments you feel like you're not learning anything or it gets boring. One week challenges might be fun and you might learn somethings but if you really want to learn a language well then keep all this in mind.

For those wanting to learn Arabic I'd recommend you check out the reprint of the madeena books (seven books now rather than the original three). I personally liked Wheeler Thackston's grammar of Quranic Arabic, Alan Jone's grammar of Quranic Arabic is also very good and more palatable for people who don't know anything about grammatical terms. Wright's grammar is a good intermediate grammar.

For Farsi I liked Lambton's Persian Grammar, Thackston also has a good book. I've also heard good things about the Easy Persian website.

___________________________________________________

And while we're in the business of recommending languages, I'd recommend Syriac to those interested in early Islamic history and/or want to understand the types of Christianity the Prophet would have encountered. Thackston's grammar of Syriac, Coakley's paradigms, and Noldeke's Compendious Grammar as a reference for syntax would leave you with a pretty good understanding of the language. And maybe Ancient Egyptian just for fun (refer to Alan Gardiner's grammar). 

Alhumdolillah brother. I know I might not be the first one to ask this. And I wish this doesn't sounds rude to you but what is the Philosophy behind your "NAME"?? Abu Bakr??

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W/s

I'm currently learning Japanese and hope to learn Arabic to an intermediate level in the future. 

I can personally vouch for Ibn Al-Ja'abi's advice above, especially on self-motivation (if your self-learning the language this is arguably the most important factor). To add, living in the country of your target language will really help with immersion, as will listening to podcasts and watching movies/TV shows (initially with English subs) if moving abroad for a short time isn't feasible.

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, Ibn Al-Ja'abi said:

While learning languages is a great endeavor, you want to make sure you learn in a sustainable and productive way. Simply dedicating a solid week to writing sentences won't be enough. You need to also understand how the individual words in the sentence come together to form the sentence, in other words, learn the grammar of the language, this alongside doing practical learning such as translating, writing sentences, speaking activities, and reading. And you want to actually create a schedule and stick to it, that means studying the language a certain amount of times a week -- preferably daily -- and consistently sticking to it. That means you should also pick a language you're interested in because you'll  need to keep motivation up, especially during the moments you feel like you're not learning anything or it gets boring. One week challenges might be fun and you might learn somethings but if you really want to learn a language well then keep all this in mind.

For those wanting to learn Arabic I'd recommend you check out the reprint of the madeena books (seven books now rather than the original three). I personally liked Wheeler Thackston's grammar of Quranic Arabic, Alan Jone's grammar of Quranic Arabic is also very good and more palatable for people who don't know anything about grammatical terms. Wright's grammar is a good intermediate grammar.

For Farsi I liked Lambton's Persian Grammar, Thackston also has a good book. I've also heard good things about the Easy Persian website.

___________________________________________________

And while we're in the business of recommending languages, I'd recommend Syriac to those interested in early Islamic history and/or want to understand the types of Christianity the Prophet would have encountered. Thackston's grammar of Syriac, Coakley's paradigms, and Noldeke's Compendious Grammar as a reference for syntax would leave you with a pretty good understanding of the language. And maybe Ancient Egyptian just for fun (refer to Alan Gardiner's grammar). 

I see what you’re saying. But I don’t think everyone has the time or dedication to spend hours working out the grammar or learning the root words. I know this would be a great benefit to me, as grammar is part of learning a language. I will probably consider this in the future.

This ‘really’ was an idea for those who have a busy life style. Giving 2-3 minutes every few hours everyday (just memorising a sentence or a 2) won’t be difficult. So we can also have that ‘feel good’ moment that we have achieved something. See Allah loves those who at least try. 

Oh btw it’s not just for a week we’ll carry on learning more (the same language chosen) everyweek inshallah. 

And you never know may end up taking actual language lessons. (That’s if my little one is in a good mood:accident:)

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