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In the Name of God بسم الله
sidnaq

How do Christians view the ten commandments?

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On 11/29/2017 at 2:41 PM, baqar said:

"And say not of those killed in God's way that they are dead. Indeed, they are living, but you are not aware."

My understanding is that they are living, but not on earth and out of earshot. There is no hint of proxy salvation, nor post mortal aid in the scriptures that I know of thus far. Pity, as I could use all the help I can get. 

 

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hi in shia Islam view because all their Imams (as) +Ahlulbayt(as)were martyred are still alive & the 12th Imam is still alive but they are everywhere and take care of Shia Muslims by  permission of Allah (God).

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1 hour ago, Son of Placid said:

Nazarene wasn't a Christian group. It predated Christianity by centuries. The voluntary vow one took to be a Nazarene was temporary. It was aside from ones religion. It was determined in the Old Testament, Numbers 6.

The vow to become a Nazarene included such things as touching nothing grape, or grape related, although alcohol from other sources were acceptable. Allowing one's hair to grow, and never touching a dead body. It included a ritual immersion in Judaism, and sacrificial offerings. A lamb as a burnt offering, a ewe as a sin offering, and a ram as a peace offering. At the end of their term they would shave their hair and burn it with the peace offering. 

hi its similar to Islamic Rituals as we give the temporary Vow to be Muslim and drinking alcohol from Grape & other external sources is forbidden  but we slaughter lamb & give the meat to poor people & at the end of Hajj pilgrimage we shave our hair with the peace offering.

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4 hours ago, Son of Placid said:

Nazarene wasn't a Christian group. It predated Christianity by centuries. The voluntary vow one took to be a Nazarene was temporary. It was aside from ones religion. It was determined in the Old Testament, Numbers 6.

Wikipedia say:

"The Nazarenes were similar to the Ebionites, in that they considered themselves Jews, maintained an adherence to the Law of Moses, and used only the Aramaic Gospel of the Hebrews, rejecting all the Canonical gospels. However, unlike half of the Ebionites, they accepted the Virgin Birth"

And about the Gospel of Hebrews:

"The Gospel of the Hebrews (Greek: τὸ καθ' Ἑβραίους εὐαγγέλιον), or Gospel according to the Hebrews, was a syncretic Jewish–Christian gospel, the text of which is lost; only fragments of it survive as brief quotations by the early Church Fathers and in apocryphal writings. The fragments contain traditions of Jesus' pre-existence, incarnation, baptism, and probable temptation, along with some of his sayings. Distinctive features include a Christology characterized by the belief that the Holy Spirit is Jesus' Divine Mother and a first resurrection appearance to James, the brother of Jesus, showing a high regard for James as the leader of the Jewish Christian church in Jerusalem. It was probably composed in Greek in the first decades of the 2nd century, and is believed to have been used by Greek-speaking Jewish Christians in Egypt during that century"

Interesting is that Trinity seemingly already was an issue among early Christians, and that there was a sect that Mary somehow was involved. This could explain the Quranic belief that trinity is God, Jesus and Mary.

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hi with respect to your comment the Quran doesnt approve Trinity & it says there is only one God the last paragraph may be edited wrongly in Islamic view Jesus (as) is only Prophet of Allah but his birth is similar to creation of Adam(as) & the sura of Maryam explains his position to other woman. that you can see it on following link

http://tanzil.net/#19:1

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2 hours ago, Ashvazdanghe said:

hi with respect to your comment the Quran doesnt approve Trinity & it says there is only one God the last paragraph may be edited wrongly in Islamic view Jesus (as) is only Prophet of Allah but his birth is similar to creation of Adam(as) & the sura of Maryam explains his position to other woman. that you can see it on following link

http://tanzil.net/#19:1

I know Muslims believe there is only one God. So does Christians, but I can understand that the dogma of trinity gives Muslims an impression of polytheism. I am not a Trinitarian Christian myself. 

Good site, translations into many languages, my own inclusively.

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On 12/2/2017 at 4:49 PM, Son of Placid said:

My understanding is that they are living, but not on earth and out of earshot. 

Hi SoP

According to Shia Muslim belief, you are right about "not on earth" but not right about "out of earshot."

God's special people, which in our belief, includes Prophets, Imams (and may be some other exceptional people) have a very special place in His realm.   

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On 11/21/2017 at 7:18 PM, sidnaq said:

Does it apply to them? Even the first one ,

  1. You shall have no other gods before Me.

How do Christians explain the first one?

Christians pray to God, Jesus is a mediator. Even if they give Jesus divine status, they still pray to God. Some groups believe in praying to saints as well. I guess if Muslims can pray to Imams, then this concept isn't so far off. There are so many denominations with scattered beliefs, it's really hard to pin down one belief across all Christians. 

Christians don't spend a lot of time on the ten commandments because Jesus said, "A new commandment I give unto you that ye love one another as I have loved you." 

Love doesn't allow for killing stealing, adultery, etc. The new commandment pretty much covers the ten commandments, any questions, check with the ten commandments. It's still a basic in Christianity.

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9 hours ago, Son of Placid said:

I guess if Muslims can pray to Imams, then this concept isn't so far off.

Hi we consider them as mediators too but anti shia group propagandize that we worship them instead of God(Allah) 

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13 hours ago, Son of Placid said:

 I guess if Muslims can pray to Imams, then this concept isn't so far off.

True.

However, we don't really pray to our Imams.

The Islamic view is that all of God's top brass are essentially alive.

(Q. 2:154) talks specifically about those who have lost their lives for the sake of God.

But the premise can also be extended to others among God's choicest men and women.

And the Shia view is that we can even ask them for assistance in resolving our problems.

They are alive and have the power and ability to attend to us.

But prayer in the sense of worship - that is only the Lord's prerogative. 

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5 hours ago, IloveImamHussain said:

True.

However, we don't really pray to our Imams.

The Islamic view is that all of God's top brass are essentially alive.

(Q. 2:154) talks specifically about those who have lost their lives for the sake of God.

But the premise can also be extended to others among God's choicest men and women.

And the Shia view is that we can even ask them for assistance in resolving our problems.

They are alive and have the power and ability to attend to us.

But prayer in the sense of worship - that is only the Lord's prerogative. 

I'm not overly sure who does what or who prays to whom in most of the churches. Protestants basically pray to God, then again some groups pray to their dead relatives. I've always had trouble with the chain of command, so I'll continue to pray to God. Jesus said, "If you ask anything in my name...", which is why you will hear Christians close a prayer with "In Jesus name, amen". 

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On 2018-02-05 at 6:00 PM, Son of Placid said:

I'm not overly sure who does what or who prays to whom in most of the churches. Protestants basically pray to God, then again some groups pray to their dead relatives. I've always had trouble with the chain of command, so I'll continue to pray to God. Jesus said, "If you ask anything in my name...", which is why you will hear Christians close a prayer with "In Jesus name, amen". 

Never heard about Christians praying to their dead relatives. Which sect?

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