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In the Name of God بسم الله

Was Avicenna a Shia?

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9 hours ago, Muslim96 said:

Yes, he was an ismaeli shia.

There is difference of opinion, if you read the reply above you. Just because Avicenna's father was an Ismaili does not mean that he was. Everyone is free to choose their madhab in adulthood. See this:

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He was a genius, who because of his political views and religious tendencies in favour of the Prophet's Ahl al-Bayt, found himself persecuted by Sultan Mahmoud of Ghazna. 

https://www.imamreza.net/eng/imamreza.php?id=10085

Edited by wolverine
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40 minutes ago, wolverine said:

There is difference of opinion, if you read the reply above you. Just because Avicenna's father was an Ismaili does not mean that he was. Everyone is free to choose their madhab in adulthood. See this:

The link you posted doesn't claim he was a Twelver.

It was not just his father, evidence from Ibn Sina's writings shows him to be an Ismaili.

In any case ismailis also loved the Ahlalbayt and were persecuted for it. Sultan Mahmood Ghaznavi also persecuted many Ismaili Shias in the Indians plains during his numerous raids.

Ismailis were the mainstream Shias at the time, fom Egypt ( where they had the government) to Persia through to the Indian plains. In contrast, Twelvers were a small and quietist and minority.

 

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1 hour ago, wolverine said:

Just because Avicenna's father was an Ismaili does not mean that he was. Everyone is free to choose their madhab in adulthood.

Wikipedia says that Sunnis, Shias and Ismailis claim Ibn Sina (Avicenna) as their own. This is a photo of his tomb;

10716513.jpg

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Early islamic societies experimented religion as a matter of habit and culture, rather than a field of study by itself,as Ibn Khaldun puts it.

Avicenna was not as concerned with denominations as he was with philosophy. He had an aristotelian spirit and his thoughts and beliefs were heavily influenced by it. A simple denomination, especially such a specific one (a sect within Islam) would, in no way, help to describe his thought. To be honest, he even reminds me of Descartes, in the way he is described as a Christian but experimented Christianity in a very different, mathematical approach.

In later Islamic societies, such as the andalusi one, you may find more coherent and precise approaches to reconcile aristotelian philosophy with the islamic school of thought, such as the works of Ibn Rushd.

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