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In the Name of God بسم الله

Chador vs Hijab

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Bismehe Ta3ala,

Assalam Alikum 

When some people are referring to women as chadoori in Iran, why is it taken in a negative light? 

M3 Salamah, FE AMIN Allah

Aug. 26, 2017 | 11:06 AM

Chador in, hijab out: Iran VP's wardrobe draws criticism

Associated Press
 
 

 

TEHRAN: Just a couple of weeks into her appointment, the new Iranian vice president's decision to abandon her fashion style for the all-encompassing black chador is raising questions among women in the Islamic Republic - especially after she said President Hassan Rouhani personally asked her to wear the traditional women's garment.

Although Laaya Joneidi typically used to wear a hijab - the headscarf that is mandated by law in today's Iran - and a long coat with pants, her switch to the more conservative chador serves as a political statement in and of itself in the Islamic Republic.

And coming after Rouhani failed to nominate any women to serve as ministers in his Cabinet, some are questioning the moderate cleric's campaign promise to bring more women into the government.

"Not only could Rouhani not appoint a woman minister, but also he could not appoint a vice president who does not wear the chador either and forced her to wear the chador," tweeted Hamid Mashayekhi Rad, an Islamic seminary student and activist.

The controversy began when a government website posted a photograph of Joneidi, who earned a doctorate from Harvard in comparative law and international commercial arbitration, wearing the long black chador, exposing only her face. Social media exploded with posts referring to her as a "chadori."

The controversy only grew after Joneidi, one of two female vice presidents in Rouhani's new government, gave an interview to the reformist daily newspaper Sharq.

"Mr. Rouhani, because of the protocol of the Cabinet, asked me to wear the chador," she told the newspaper. "I respected his demand."

The criticism then found a target in Rouhani, whose re-election campaign promised women spots in his 18-minister Cabinet. The cleric had no women ministers in his first term, and when he announced appointees for his second term, earlier in August, there were again no women among his picks.

The following day, Rouhani named two women as vice presidents, including Joneidi.

"Mr. Rouhani, based on which law or your protocol forced Laaya Joneidi to wear the chador?" tweeted Amene Shirafkan, a journalist who works at "Zanan-Emrooz" or "Today's Women" magazine.

The chador controversy underscores the unwritten protocol rules for those in public office and government in Iran - rules that also affect men. Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammed Javad Zarif famously wore a goatee before entering Rouhani's government, but later grew the full beard common for those in power.

The chador has a long history in Iranian politics. The sisters of Shah Reza Pahlavi famously tossed theirs away in public in the 1930s, before it was outlawed. In the 1979 Islamic Revolution, women who took to the streets to rally in support of the clerics embraced the chador. After the revolution installed the clerics in power, the hijab became law.

In theory, women not wearing the chador are to wear baggy clothes and coats as to not accentuate their form.

However, in Tehran today, some fashionable young women wear tighter clothes with a scarf loosely covering their head, technically meeting the requirements of the law while drawing the ire of conservatives. Morality police enforce the government-mandated Islamic dress code, while others have protested the requirement on social media.

Women in government find it tougher to resist the demand to wear the chador.

Masoumeh Ebtekar famously gave up her style for a chador when she became a vice president under former President Mohammad Khatami in 1997. In 2000, a lawmaker threatened to beat Elaheh Koulaii, a hijab-wearing lawmaker from Tehran, if she didn't wear a chador. She stood her ground and refused.

Soroush Farhadian, a Tehran-based political analyst who backs reformists, says that not wearing a chador remains a taboo in Iranian politics. By asking Joneidi to wear one, Rouhani was trying to avoid a confrontation with hard-liners, he said.

"The taboo was broken by Koulaii in the parliament, but it is not broken at the government level yet," Farhadian said.

 

http://www.dailystar.com.lb/News/Middle-East/2017/Aug-26/417264-chador-in-hijab-out-iran-vps-wardrobe-draws-criticism.ashx

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Sometimes a chador can exceed a requirement to cover up, which should only expose the face, and hands, and feet, by some woman covering a part of their faces with it, which is not required in Islam.

Furthermore, there is a false notion in Iran that somehow a woman who wears chador is more religious. Islamically, however, there is no difference between a woman who wears chador and someone who wears hijab. 

I think that some woman who wear chador are making Islam harder for themselves by wearing the extra piece of clothing, because unless your hijab is pinned, the hijab to cover your hair will be more likely to move than if you just wore a headscarf properly. 

In the end, my issue with the chador is that it's not from Islam - it is more of a cultural form of dress, especially when woman start half-covering their faces with it.

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1 hour ago, Islandsandmirrors said:

Sometimes a chador can exceed a requirement to cover up, which should only expose the face, and hands, and feet, by some woman covering a part of their faces with it, which is not required in Islam.

Furthermore, there is a false notion in Iran that somehow a woman who wears chador is more religious. Islamically, however, there is no difference between a woman who wears chador and someone who wears hijab. 

I think that some woman who wear chador are making Islam harder for themselves by wearing the extra piece of clothing, because unless your hijab is pinned, the hijab to cover your hair will be more likely to move than if you just wore a headscarf properly. 

In the end, my issue with the chador is that it's not from Islam - it is more of a cultural form of dress, especially when woman start half-covering their faces with it.

Sayyidat Al-Zahra (as) is Allah's representative on Earth, she is truth, what she does IS Islam. The reality is that she donned clothing more conversative and concealing than the modern chador you find in Iran. 

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On 8/26/2017 at 3:20 AM, Laayla said:

Bismehe Ta3ala,

Assalam Alikum 

When some people are referring to women as chadoori in Iran, why is it taken in a negative light? 

M3 Salamah, FE AMIN Allah

Aug. 26, 2017 | 11:06 AM

Chador in, hijab out: Iran VP's wardrobe draws criticism

Associated Press
 
 

 

TEHRAN: Just a couple of weeks into her appointment, the new Iranian vice president's decision to abandon her fashion style for the all-encompassing black chador is raising questions among women in the Islamic Republic - especially after she said President Hassan Rouhani personally asked her to wear the traditional women's garment.

Although Laaya Joneidi typically used to wear a hijab - the headscarf that is mandated by law in today's Iran - and a long coat with pants, her switch to the more conservative chador serves as a political statement in and of itself in the Islamic Republic.

And coming after Rouhani failed to nominate any women to serve as ministers in his Cabinet, some are questioning the moderate cleric's campaign promise to bring more women into the government.

"Not only could Rouhani not appoint a woman minister, but also he could not appoint a vice president who does not wear the chador either and forced her to wear the chador," tweeted Hamid Mashayekhi Rad, an Islamic seminary student and activist.

The controversy began when a government website posted a photograph of Joneidi, who earned a doctorate from Harvard in comparative law and international commercial arbitration, wearing the long black chador, exposing only her face. Social media exploded with posts referring to her as a "chadori."

The controversy only grew after Joneidi, one of two female vice presidents in Rouhani's new government, gave an interview to the reformist daily newspaper Sharq.

"Mr. Rouhani, because of the protocol of the Cabinet, asked me to wear the chador," she told the newspaper. "I respected his demand."

The criticism then found a target in Rouhani, whose re-election campaign promised women spots in his 18-minister Cabinet. The cleric had no women ministers in his first term, and when he announced appointees for his second term, earlier in August, there were again no women among his picks.

The following day, Rouhani named two women as vice presidents, including Joneidi.

"Mr. Rouhani, based on which law or your protocol forced Laaya Joneidi to wear the chador?" tweeted Amene Shirafkan, a journalist who works at "Zanan-Emrooz" or "Today's Women" magazine.

The chador controversy underscores the unwritten protocol rules for those in public office and government in Iran - rules that also affect men. Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammed Javad Zarif famously wore a goatee before entering Rouhani's government, but later grew the full beard common for those in power.

The chador has a long history in Iranian politics. The sisters of Shah Reza Pahlavi famously tossed theirs away in public in the 1930s, before it was outlawed. In the 1979 Islamic Revolution, women who took to the streets to rally in support of the clerics embraced the chador. After the revolution installed the clerics in power, the hijab became law.

In theory, women not wearing the chador are to wear baggy clothes and coats as to not accentuate their form.

However, in Tehran today, some fashionable young women wear tighter clothes with a scarf loosely covering their head, technically meeting the requirements of the law while drawing the ire of conservatives. Morality police enforce the government-mandated Islamic dress code, while others have protested the requirement on social media.

Women in government find it tougher to resist the demand to wear the chador.

Masoumeh Ebtekar famously gave up her style for a chador when she became a vice president under former President Mohammad Khatami in 1997. In 2000, a lawmaker threatened to beat Elaheh Koulaii, a hijab-wearing lawmaker from Tehran, if she didn't wear a chador. She stood her ground and refused.

Soroush Farhadian, a Tehran-based political analyst who backs reformists, says that not wearing a chador remains a taboo in Iranian politics. By asking Joneidi to wear one, Rouhani was trying to avoid a confrontation with hard-liners, he said.

"The taboo was broken by Koulaii in the parliament, but it is not broken at the government level yet," Farhadian said.

 

http://www.dailystar.com.lb/News/Middle-East/2017/Aug-26/417264-chador-in-hijab-out-iran-vps-wardrobe-draws-criticism.ashx

This article makes me upset. I lived in Iran for 23 years, so I know exactly what is going on there.

First of all, Chador is not the definition of Hijab. Definition of Hijab is covering every portion of the body (for women) except face and hands up to the wrist. As long as you satisfy this limitations, it is correct Islamically. If a woman wears Chador, it is not related to other people. Other people can not pretend that there is a force on women or something like that. It only brings sadness and anger to the society. Moreover, this conservation on Hijab is because they don't want women to take Hijab easy. It is RELIGIOUS ORDER to wear Hijab. Why do some people think it's force? I have no idea. Currently, I ran has a lot of economical and marriage problems. I really don't know why some people don't spend enough time on major problems. Giving job to people and providing them with marriage opportunities brings more satisfaction to the government rather than talking about wearing Chador is better or wearing something else? Just satisfy Islamic conditions, and you're good.

Brothers and sisters, you are Shia Muslim. 35 years ago Iraq attacked Iran, and Shia Muslims like you from Iran, defended Islam and Iran. Look at their Vasiyat Nameh (=testament) and read what they wrote about Hijab. We gave blood for Hijab. It is not correct to violate their requests. It's about our religion. I know that some politicians in Iran are trying to deviate Islamic culture of the country (some of them). Be wise. Rasoulullah said: "Mumin never get hurt twice for the same reason". 

Bless be upon those women who wear Hijab in hot summer. I would never forget them in my prays.

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I stayed in iran for ages. If you go to places like tehran all women wear chador- literally half hair all showing and underneath you can wear almost anything, so long as no skin is shown. I remember in tehran we used to wear jeans.

I will never understand why some people complain about chador in iran. It is so simple to wear it and because it is so loose and half of most womens head is showing anyway, how is it "impractical" or oppressing in anyway.

Literally, you are just getting a thin cloth and chucking it over your head (even though this isnt actually proper hijab)

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8 hours ago, notme said:

Is chador the Iranian cultural version of hijab? Perhaps it's the uniform for members of the government as a patriotic statement? 

 

1292df0faa36132ad1a240091cda135a--hijab-tutorial-iranian.jpg.cc4e4946cd01a21d7b5f4463f37a2316.jpg

Just modest dress really, I think some Iraqis wear it too. 

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Hello,

On 8/26/2017 at 4:25 AM, hasanhh said:

l don't consider it a negative. A chador is quite convenient. Just put it on and go about your business without having to "get all dressed up".

I am surprised by this.  How often do you wear the chador?  :hahaha:

All the Best,

David

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  • 1 year later...
On 8/26/2017 at 1:20 AM, Laayla said:

When some people are referring to women as chadoori in Iran, why is it taken in a negative light? 

Calling someone a chadori in Iran is only in reference to typical nosy behavior shown by many chadori women, such as staring and scowling, and generally being disrespectful to others. Many chadoris are from low social-economical status and that influences their behavior more than the chador itself.

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2 hours ago, Islandsandmirrors said:

Calling someone a chadori in Iran is only in reference to typical nosy behavior shown by many chadori women, such as staring and scowling, and generally being disrespectful to others. Many chadoris are from low social-economical status and that influences their behavior more than the chador itself.

this was true in past years but , we see growing wearing chador between women with higher level of life & education instead of it inappropriate & western style fashion that  is spreading more between women that you described more than before &  we  see less these group as modest persons day by day yet it's not ehat media shows but we have women that play in enemy field to request free visa & support from them most of women that post their pictures without Hijab in public in social media immediately after that go to turkey & then they receive their visas .

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12 hours ago, Laayla said:

haha

brother I wonder if you miss @David66

I'm waiting when a big event happens, he usually comes back to share his opinions.

What is your preference? Chador, burqa, hijb or neka ?

Sorry for the pour spelin'.

Edited by hasanhh
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21 minutes ago, hasanhh said:

What is your preference? Chador, burqa, hijb or neka ?

Sorry for the pour spelin'.

I prefer chador and hijab 

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23 hours ago, hasanhh said:

What is your preference? Chador, burqa, hijb or neka ?

Sorry for the pour spelin'.

Assalam Alikum brother Hasan

Joum3 Mubaraqa!

I wear Hijab with 3baya.

When I visit our Imams I don the chador.  

If I visit Yemen, it would be appropriate to wear Nikab.

God bless you.  Since when do you misspell words?  :)

M3 Salamah, FE AMIN Allah

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On 8/26/2017 at 6:18 AM, User4628568309 said:

Sayyidat Al-Zahra (as) is Allah's representative on Earth, she is truth, what she does IS Islam. The reality is that she donned clothing more conversative and concealing than the modern chador you find in Iran. 

Wow beautifully said, I agree 100% agree

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On 8/26/2017 at 6:53 PM, AmirAlmuminin Lover said:

I know that some politicians in Iran are trying to deviate Islamic culture of the country (some of them). Be wise. Rasoulullah said: "Mumin never get hurt twice for the same reason". 

Bless be upon those women who wear Hijab in hot summer. I would never forget them in my prays.

It's sadly true many so called reformist politicians are trying to replace 2030 protocol instead if islamic teaching by disguising it in an islamic cover by doing these action 

Chador is superior hijab not just hijab 

As Dr Ali shariati said as a quote :'forfor destroying a fact don't attack it well , just defend it bad' 

This is what so called reformists politician are doing they defending from Islamic values in bad way .

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17 minutes ago, Ashvazdanghe said:

Chador is superior hijab not just hijab 

Couple of questions :)

1.  If there are levels of hijab, and chador is superior to hijab proscribed in Islam, what is superior to chador?

2.  Are there levels of piety based on expressions of hijab?  Are niqabi's in KSA more pious than Iranian hijabi's - even though they both meet hijab Islamic requirements?

Edited by Maryaam
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34 minutes ago, Maryaam said:

Couple of questions :)

1.  If there are levels of hijab, and chador is superior to hijab proscribed in Islam, what is superior to chador?

2.  Are there levels of piety based on expressions of hijab?  Are niqabi's in KSA more pious than Iranian hijabi's - even though they both meet hijab Islamic requirements?

I just said a famous quote that is propogating ever where but ,level of hijab depends on religion & region some women like as Mrs leila hussain that converted from Judaism to shia islam uses iranian style of chador in Britain but using niqab or Burqa is more  regional costume 

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8 minutes ago, Ashvazdanghe said:

I just said a famous quote that is propogating ever where but ,level of hijab depends on religion & region some women like as Mrs leila hussain that converted from Judaism to shia islam uses iranian style of chador in Britain but using niqab or Burqa is more  regional costume 

So, I think what you are saying is that various expressions of Islamic hijab are cultural, they do not indicate levels of piety?

Edited by Maryaam
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44 minutes ago, Maryaam said:

So, I think what you are saying is that various expressions of Islamic hijab are cultural, they do not indicate levels of piety?

Just wearing hijab doesn't hijab doesn't mran piety but we expect more piety from who wears Chador than other because Chador is a symbol of piety, in current situation women that just use scarf & abaya is a little becomes accepted even by western culture  but who  wears Chador by her choice is more pious than other from what I see in dream of lady Zahra ,she was wearing iranian Chador but her holy face & hands not visible withour niqab or burqa ,she was hiding her face & hands by her Chador too not any niqab or glove .

Edited by Ashvazdanghe
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The Hijab conundrum :why some  are taking it off |Sheikh Muhammad al-hilli 

https://youtu.be/4jwvrp7Sx6c

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How to put on Iranian style chador (Hijab) 

Burqa , Niqab ,chador , Hijab

Irani diamonteaze Chaddar | Hijabeaze by Urooj n 

 

Women’s dress burka , hijab ,chador and leggings 

 

Abaya designs | irani long Cahder beautiful look |trends for Gil’s & work 

Latest Abaya collection | stylish | Chadar |cape | Faraha 2017 

 

Iran-information about Iran -Chador

Iranian womenadd fashion to hijab 

Different Muslim head covering explained 

 

Painless hijab km niqab irani chador

 

Edited by Ashvazdanghe
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  • 3 weeks later...
  • Advanced Member (With Brothers Forum Membership)

Muslim girl wearing Hijab hospitalized after racist assault in school in US / Video

December 18, 2018 - 8:10 PM News Code : 921161 Source : Anadolu, yenisafakLink: 
 

A Syrian teenager was hospitalized after facing a racist attack at her high school last week. 

Seyma, 15, who wears a headscarf, was punched by another student at the toilet of Chartiers Valley High School in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on Friday, said a Turkish national who asked not to be named. 

She fainted following the assault and had to be rushed to a hospital. 

Her attacker was part of a group smoking an e-cigarette in the toilet. They bullied Seyma into leaving the premises; when she refused they shoved her to the ground and punched her. 

She told Seyma that she would have insulted her in Arabic if she could speak the language. 

The violent incident was recorded by other students on their phones and posted on social media. 

The video garnered online support seeking justice for the victim. 

Also, a petition was filed and it is expected that the case will be taken to the federal prosecution office. 

Seyma was discharged from the hospital on late Sunday while her attacker has been suspended from school for three days. 

 

http://en.abna24.com/news//muslim-girl-wearing-hijab-hospitalized-after-racist-assault-in-school-in-us-video_921161.html

Georgia Muslim student says school expelled her for wearing hijab

http://en.abna24.com/news//georgia-muslim-student-says-school-expelled-her-for-wearing-hijab_920656.html

December 15, 2018 - 4:32 PM News Code : 920656 Source : The BlazeLink: 
Georgia Muslim student says school expelled her for wearing hijab
 

Linde McAvoy converted to Islam a few weeks after she enrolled in the Georgia Career Institute Conyers, US state of Georgia, for cosmetology last December — so she started wearing a hijab (headscarf) to her classes. 

But according to complaint letter to GCI, McAvoy "almost immediately" began getting harassed by GCI administrators. 

"For example, Joyce Meadows — GCI's president and CEO, who is also the campus director for the Murfreesboro [Tennessee] campus — started insisting that Ms. McAvoy remove the hijab, citing the school's dress code," the letter from Muslim Advocates said. "Even after Ms. McAvoy explained that she wore her hijab out of religious obligation, Ms. Meadows insisted on its removal, despite the fact that the dress code does not prohibit religious head coverings. Ms. McAvoy was repeatedly ejected from her classes for wearing her hijab." 

The complaint letter added that Meadows told McAvoy if she wanted to continue attending GCI she would have to remove her hijab while on campus or provide external confirmation that she wore the hijab for religious reasons — and McAvoy refused, saying the school cites no such requirement. 

The letter said McAvoy continued to cover her hair at school, and then GCI expelled her in late February. 

http://en.abna24.com/news//iran-foreign-ministry-advises-nationals-to-avoid-unnecessary-trips-to-georgia_920055.html

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1 hour ago, Ashvazdanghe said:

The aggressive student should be charged with assault causing bodily harm as the victim had a concussion and was in hospital.  For some reason, assaults in school are seen as less of a criminal act than when they occur outside of school.  They shouldn't be. Assault is assault. And you should be even safer in school than on the street - not less.  However, one would have a hard time presenting this particular assault in the girls washroom as a "racist" as the fight was over using the cubicle to smoke... unless something happened after the video that we didn't get to see.  

I remember (new immigrant) boys from two different countries, in my high school, stabbing each other with sharpened wooden pencils and hitting each other over the head with pipes that were taken from this heavy duty fencing around the school.  They used to only get "suspended" (just like the girl in this video did apparently - I read this on another site), even though they caused injuries.  

Edited by Maryaam
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