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In the Name of God بسم الله

Iranian TV host caught without hijab in Switzerlnd

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Two things i noticed:
1. She says she was wearing a scarf and it fell off.......was she wearing a scarf over the glasses she has on her head? Sounds fishy too me. 
2. The drinking beer thing is another case though. It's very serious to accuse someone of drinking alcohol when that "beer" could have been something like Istak(which btw is awesome, alcohol free beer)

As a public figure, she should be more careful though, if she is not guilty, and we should be more careful not to judge too quickly. 

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[MOD NOTE: The video was reported for women with no hijab. If you are sensitive to this issue, then please don't watch it. The video is being allowed because we have female members who are interested in this.]

I dont think there is a scarf.  But it is her business.  

 

Edited by Hameedeh
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quite a common occurrence as evident by taking a flight to/from Iran. 

Women adorn the chador upon landing in an Iranian city and take it off as soon as the plane takes off (international flight).

Not all of course. Religion shouldn't be regulated with a stick.

Edited by shiaman14
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1 hour ago, shiaman14 said:

quite a common occurrence as evident by taking a flight to/from Iran. 

Women adorn the chador upon landing in an Iranian city and take it off as soon as the plane takes off (international flight).

Not all of course. Religion shouldn't be regulated with a stick.

I don't think chadori are like that those who do that are mostly people who have already a bad hijab in Iran from what I saw personaly. 

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3 hours ago, shiaman14 said:

quite a common occurrence as evident by taking a flight to/from Iran. 

Women adorn the chador upon landing in an Iranian city and take it off as soon as the plane takes off (international flight).

Not all of course. Religion shouldn't be regulated with a stick.

Do you believe that parts of Religion should be regulated with a stick or non of it in a society(public)? More specificly, i'm asking, do you believe in a muslim society where the significant majority are muslims, should "don't do" laws be regulated with a stick? Such as drinking, slandering, fornication, breaking fast in public etc etc, and leave the "do's" of religion such as praying, fasting, etc etc unregulated?

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4 hours ago, shiaman14 said:

Women adorn the chador upon landing in an Iranian city and take it off as soon as the plane takes off (international flight).

This is simply not true.

Nobody is doing that. Literally, nobody.

Headscarves, sure. Very common. But literally nobody is wearing a chador upon landing in Iran or passing over Iranian airspace or any of that, unless she was already wearing it.

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Btw, this is her explaining:
http://www.yjc.ir/fa/news/6177352/واکنش-آزاده-نامداری-به-انتشار-تصاویر-جنجالی-در-فضای-مجازی-فیلم

Points she made:
1. She doesn't want to defend her self but will say a little.
2. Everyone around her was mahram and her headscarf fell off a little and she was tired with the kid, and since no one was around she let it stay off a little(you notice the rest of her clothes is pretty modest. 
3. She is not pleased with any muslim spreading this and tarnishing her reputation. 

Sooooo... there it is. 

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33 minutes ago, repenter said:

2. Everyone around her was mahram and her headscarf fell off a little and she was tired with the kid, and since no one was around she let it stay off a little(you notice the rest of her clothes is pretty modest. 

So she was wearing sunglasses under her headscarf?

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Just now, Hassan- said:

So she was wearing sunglasses under her headscarf?

According to her, she had scarf on first, then it fell. She was tired and warm, and since no one was around she let it stay off a little. Now how long a little is, i don't know.

But personally, instead of being upset at her, i choose to be upset at a jerk who would film her and share the image of someones mahram like that. I have personally been with mahrams at the beach in Iran, and they take their headscarf off when there is no one close enough to tell or notice the shapes or texture of peoples hair, skin etc. I'm not saying its right, because personally i don't like the idea exactly because of reasons like this, but fiqh wise, i don't see a problem with it. 

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5 hours ago, shiaman14 said:

quite a common occurrence as evident by taking a flight to/from Iran. 

Women adorn the chador upon landing in an Iranian city and take it off as soon as the plane takes off (international flight).

Not all of course. Religion shouldn't be regulated with a stick.

I wonder how the Imam of our time ajf will regulate the implementation of sharia and amr bil maroof wa nahi anil munkar.

How will he safe guard the spiritual health of society?

Will he let young people do what they feel like in public, that which effects society and everyone in it as a whole? Or will he implement the rules of Allah swt and safe guard the public from spiritual and moral corruption and let whoever wants to do something in private do it in private?

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48 minutes ago, repenter said:

According to her, she had scarf on first, then it fell. She was tired and warm, and since no one was around she let it stay off a little. Now how long a little is, i don't know.

But personally, instead of being upset at her, i choose to be upset at a jerk who would film her and share the image of someones mahram like that. I have personally been with mahrams at the beach in Iran, and they take their headscarf off when there is no one close enough to tell or notice the shapes or texture of peoples hair, skin etc. I'm not saying its right, because personally i don't like the idea exactly because of reasons like this, but fiqh wise, i don't see a problem with it. 

I dont know the true story behind this but all I can say is that the media loves these kind of things.

And people LOVE seeing someone who was portrayed as religious show herself as irreligious because it makes them feel better about themselves, kinda justifies their behavior in their mind since the "religious people" are fake anyways according to them and these stories comfort them in that mindset and that there is nothing to worry about.

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57 minutes ago, repenter said:

According to her, she had scarf on first, then it fell. She was tired and warm, and since no one was around she let it stay off a little. Now how long a little is, i don't know.

But personally, instead of being upset at her, i choose to be upset at a jerk who would film her and share the image of someones mahram like that. I have personally been with mahrams at the beach in Iran, and they take their headscarf off when there is no one close enough to tell or notice the shapes or texture of peoples hair, skin etc. I'm not saying its right, because personally i don't like the idea exactly because of reasons like this, but fiqh wise, i don't see a problem with it. 

Forte's post with the picture of her should be deleted than since its haram to look at a women without her hijab on.

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الحجرات 12

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

يَا أَيُّهَا الَّذِينَ آمَنُوا اجْتَنِبُوا كَثِيرًا مِّنَ الظَّنِّ إِنَّ بَعْضَ الظَّنِّ إِثْمٌ ۖ وَلَا تَجَسَّسُوا وَلَا يَغْتَب بَّعْضُكُم بَعْضًا ۚ أَيُحِبُّ أَحَدُكُمْ أَن يَأْكُلَ لَحْمَ أَخِيهِ مَيْتًا فَكَرِهْتُمُوهُ ۚ وَاتَّقُوا اللَّـهَ ۚ إِنَّ اللَّـهَ تَوَّابٌ رَّحِيمٌ

صدق الله العلي العظيم

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

المائدة 105

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

 يَا أَيُّهَا الَّذِينَ آمَنُوا عَلَيْكُمْ أَنفُسَكُمْ ۖ لَا يَضُرُّكُم مَّن ضَلَّ إِذَا اهْتَدَيْتُمْ ۚ إِلَى اللَّـهِ مَرْجِعُكُمْ جَمِيعًا فَيُنَبِّئُكُم بِمَا كُنتُمْ تَعْمَلُونَ

صدق الله العلي العظيم

 

Edited by First Responder
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She has probably lost her job as a TV host, because of the uproar by those who say that she is a hypocrite. If it was the BBC or paparazzi who took her photos or videotaped her, they can't be blamed for it, because she knew that she was in a public space without her hijab. If it was her own family member who provided the photos or video, then I feel sorry for such a betrayal. Unless it was her intention to do this, with an ulterior motive.  

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18 hours ago, alidu78 said:

I don't think chadori are like that those who do that are mostly people who have already a bad hijab in Iran from what I saw personaly. 

sure enough.

16 hours ago, repenter said:

Do you believe that parts of Religion should be regulated with a stick or non of it in a society(public)? More specificly, i'm asking, do you believe in a muslim society where the significant majority are muslims, should "don't do" laws be regulated with a stick? Such as drinking, slandering, fornication, breaking fast in public etc etc, and leave the "do's" of religion such as praying, fasting, etc etc unregulated?

I think every country has a right to create a set of laws - these could be based on religion or secular. But when people from that country go out of the country and conduct themselves in a manner that is against a law in their own country, we should not act surprised nor act dismayed.

Simple example, Singapore does not allow chewing gum but Singaporeans chew gum when they are not in Singapore. It would be ridiculous to be shocked at their behavior.

And let's be honest, whether its iran or Saudi or any country, a lot of women adorn the hijab not qurbatanillah but out of fear of the state so the fact that they shed their hijab when outside of the country should not be surprising.

16 hours ago, baradar_jackson said:

This is simply not true.

Nobody is doing that. Literally, nobody.

Headscarves, sure. Very common. But literally nobody is wearing a chador upon landing in Iran or passing over Iranian airspace or any of that, unless she was already wearing it.

ok, if we are being very specific, then I will take back "chador" and replace it with "headscraf + long coat" because that is more common.

I saw 2 women put on the chador upon landing in Tehran - may be they didn't have a long coat and headscarf. 

Fact remains, some women who do some form of hijab in Iran don't do it once they are out of Iran.

15 hours ago, IbnSina said:

I wonder how the Imam of our time ajf will regulate the implementation of sharia and amr bil maroof wa nahi anil munkar.

How will he safe guard the spiritual health of society?

Will he let young people do what they feel like in public, that which effects society and everyone in it as a whole? Or will he implement the rules of Allah swt and safe guard the public from spiritual and moral corruption and let whoever wants to do something in private do it in private?

That's not the point here brother.

The simple point is that there are some women in Iran who do hijab in the country but don't do it once they leave the country. Why is this shocking to everyone?

The part of not regulating Islam with a stick is directly in line with what President Rouhani said "Do not interfere so much in people’s lives, even out of compassion. … Let people choose their own path to heaven. We cannot send people to heaven by force or a whip."

A woman who adorns the hijab out of love of Allah, will not shed it no matter what. A woman who adorns the hijab out of fear of the state, will shed it at the first opportunity.

21 hours ago, notme said:

Well she's a fallible human. 

Perhaps it's not beer, but another bottled beverage. Perhaps it's non-alcohol beer. She said she was sitting with family. What right does the photographer have to invade her privacy? 

This is the exact response every momin & momina should have. Give someone the benefit of doubt in the absence of clear evidence.

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45 minutes ago, shiaman14 said:

sure enough.

I think every country has a right to create a set of laws - these could be based on religion or secular. But when people from that country go out of the country and conduct themselves in a manner that is against a law in their own country, we should not act surprised nor act dismayed.

Simple example, Singapore does not allow chewing gum but Singaporeans chew gum when they are not in Singapore. It would be ridiculous to be shocked at their behavior.

Thanks for the answer. You did however not exactly answer my question with "sticks" on the dont and do's. But ill accept it anyways.

We aren't surprised btw, we know it happenes. 

Second question if i may. What do you think of the western laws, in many countries like Norway prostitution is illegal. In thailand its not. Norwegians travelling to Thailand, if caught or proven they have hired a prostitute, will get punished upon return as if they did it at home. What is your opinion on this?

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Quote

Simple example, Singapore does not allow chewing gum but Singaporeans chew gum when they are not in Singapore. It would be ridiculous to be shocked at their behavior.

Actually you can chew gum but you can't sell it. So it is fine if you buy gum from Malaysia and eat it in Singapore. But in Singapore they do sell in pharmacy nicotine gum.

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2 hours ago, repenter said:

Thanks for the answer. You did however not exactly answer my question with "sticks" on the dont and do's. But ill accept it anyways.

Sorry I thought I did with the President Rouhani quote.

 

20 hours ago, repenter said:

Do you believe that parts of Religion should be regulated with a stick or non of it in a society(public)? More specificly, i'm asking, do you believe in a muslim society where the significant majority are muslims, should "don't do" laws be regulated with a stick? Such as drinking, slandering, fornication, breaking fast in public etc etc, and leave the "do's" of religion such as praying, fasting, etc etc unregulated?

Right or wrong, I believe exactly as President Rouhani said, "Do not interfere so much in people’s lives, even out of compassion. … Let people choose their own path to heaven. We cannot send people to heaven by force or a whip"

2 hours ago, repenter said:

Second question if i may. What do you think of the western laws, in many countries like Norway prostitution is illegal. In thailand its not. Norwegians travelling to Thailand, if caught or proven they have hired a prostitute, will get punished upon return as if they did it at home. What is your opinion on this?

Pretty much the same. Any country is entitled to any set of rules they wish to apply on their countrymen. If Norway laws dictate that any Norwegian who is found to be soliciting prostitution anywhere in the world will be prosecuted upon re-entering Norway - I can accept that. But if Norway laws dictate than any Nationality found to be soliciting prostitution anywhere in the world, will be prosecuted upon entering Norway - that would be a problem.

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2 hours ago, shiaman14 said:

Sorry I thought I did with the President Rouhani quote.

 

Right or wrong, I believe exactly as President Rouhani said, "Do not interfere so much in people’s lives, even out of compassion. … Let people choose their own path to heaven. We cannot send people to heaven by force or a whip"

Pretty much the same. Any country is entitled to any set of rules they wish to apply on their countrymen. If Norway laws dictate that any Norwegian who is found to be soliciting prostitution anywhere in the world will be prosecuted upon re-entering Norway - I can accept that. But if Norway laws dictate than any Nationality found to be soliciting prostitution anywhere in the world, will be prosecuted upon entering Norway - that would be a problem.

So what you are saying is that you agree with the laws of Iran? Because no one forces you to pray, fast, pay zakat etc. But if you break the law of the "don't" in public you will be punished. 
Presiden Rohanis quote if neither here or there though, in what context did he say this? Who has forced people to heaven? Or should i say, what law forces people people to heaven? 

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22 hours ago, IbnSina said:

And people LOVE seeing someone who was portrayed as religious show herself as irreligious because it makes them feel better about themselves, kinda justifies their behavior in their mind since the "religious people" are fake anyways according to them and these stories comfort them in that mindset and that there is nothing to worry about.

The Western media wants to show that women are abused by Islamic law and they are forced to wear hijab in Iran. 

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44 minutes ago, repenter said:

So what you are saying is that you agree with the laws of Iran? Because no one forces you to pray, fast, pay zakat etc. But if you break the law of the "don't" in public you will be punished. 

Sure I never said I disagreed with Iran's laws - not at all.

When I said, "Religion shouldn't be regulated with a stick" - I meant that while a country can enforce people to do something, it does not mean they are doing it from the heart or to get close to Allah.

44 minutes ago, repenter said:


Presiden Rohanis quote if neither here or there though, in what context did he say this? Who has forced people to heaven? Or should i say, what law forces people people to heaven? 

A couple of references:

http://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/originals/2014/05/khatami-criticizes-rouhani-heaven-force-whip.html

https://www.theguardian.com/world/iran-blog/2014/jun/03/iran-rouhani-locks-horns-hardliners-path-paradise

 

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On 7/25/2017 at 3:13 PM, Beyond said:

she was advocating something she herself did not adhere to

When hijab is the law of the country, everyone wears it, so wearing it is not advocating it. It's just the required dress code. I heard from a relative that 100% of the girls who entered a certain medical school wore the chador, but over the years of their study they stopped wearing it and switched to manteau and headscarf, so that at graduation time, very few still adhered to the chador. Wearing chador at your university or job interview increases the chance that you will be selected or hired. 

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11 hours ago, shiaman14 said:

Sure I never said I disagreed with Iran's laws - not at all.

When I said, "Religion shouldn't be regulated with a stick" - I meant that while a country can enforce people to do something, it does not mean they are doing it from the heart or to get close to Allah.

A couple of references:

http://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/originals/2014/05/khatami-criticizes-rouhani-heaven-force-whip.html

https://www.theguardian.com/world/iran-blog/2014/jun/03/iran-rouhani-locks-horns-hardliners-path-paradise

Thanks. You do not find anything wrong and perhaps fishy with those two articles? Such as, was that the appropriate answer to what Ayayollah Alamulhoda said? What did Ayatollah Alamulhoda actually say and in what context? What did other Ulama say in response to Rohanis words and why wasn't that covered by guardian? The examples given by Rohani aren't really good nor reality in terms of everyday life. We have to realise he is a president, and unfortunately, presidents are salespersons, populists and say whatever that sounds nice and easy to swallow, often without any reality to them. 

This is kind of derailing the thread and these questions arent meant for you to answer here, just thoughts i believe are important.

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8 hours ago, Hameedeh said:

When hijab is the law of the country, everyone wears it, so wearing it is not advocating it. It's just the required dress code. I heard from a relative that 100% of the girls who entered a certain medical school wore the chador, but over the years of their study they stopped wearing it and switched to manteau and headscarf, so that at graduation time, very few still adhered to the chador. Wearing chador at your university or job interview increases the chance that you will be selected or hired. 

from article

Quote

 

Azadeh Namdari promoting Islamic dress in an Iranian newspaper - she is pictured walking down the street in a headscarf

Azadeh Namdari promoted Islamic dress in Iranian newspaper Vatan-e Emruz

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18 minutes ago, Beyond said:

from article

Azadeh Namdari promoted Islamic dress in Iranian newspaper Vatan-e Emruz

Did she write the article herself or the article was written by a journalist who was writing about her and her job as a TV host? 

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On 7/25/2017 at 1:51 PM, repenter said:

2. The drinking beer thing is another case though. It's very serious to accuse someone of drinking alcohol when that "beer" could have been something like Istak(which btw is awesome, alcohol free beer)

Alcohol-free beer is quite common in Germany.

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On 7/27/2017 at 10:22 PM, Shaykh Patience101 said:

Molson Prohibition Brew is on like every other commercial come NHL playoff time. 

Yeah that's in Canada. Here in the States they don't advertise that stuff at all, and I doubt they even carry them in most stores, unless as a specialty item.

My friend just visited Germany and said there is alcohol-free beer everywhere, which surprised me because I assumed Germans were a bunch of drunkards. And perhaps they are, but they clearly also have a taste for non-alcoholic fermented barley beverages. I guess the USA beats everyone in being drunkards then?

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