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In the Name of God بسم الله
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Women in war

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Is a woman allowed to fight in a war for the sake of Allah? 

Have there been any female warriors in Islamic history?

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Sura 4:34  Men are "protectors" and "maintainers" of women, but there is nothing revealed that says women cannot protect and defend themselves. Women are also entitled to keep their "earnings".

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There is nothing that prohibits and declares women going to war forbidden, and one example of a female warrior in Islamic history was in the Battle of Uhud when the lady known as Nusaybah Bint Ka'ab donned a sword and shield along with a few other of the male companions including Imam Ali (A.S.) to defend the Prophet after the majority of the Muslim army had fled and left him alone. 

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I looked up Muslim women in wars on Google and found this post that talks about some notable female warriors (among other high profile women):

https://ballandalus.wordpress.com/2014/03/08/15-important-muslim-women-in-history/

On 2017-06-24 at 4:24 PM, Sayed Kazmi said:

There is nothing that prohibits and declares women going to war forbidden, and one example of a female warrior in Islamic history was in the Battle of Uhud when the lady known as Nusaybah Bint Ka'ab donned a sword and shield along with a few other of the male companions including Imam Ali (A.S.) to defend the Prophet after the majority of the Muslim army had fled and left him alone. 

As brother Sayed said, Nusayba b. Ka‘b al-Anṣārīyya did carry a sword and shield in the battlefield. She shielded the Prophet Muhammad from enemies during the battle and even sustained several lance wounds and arrows as she cast herself in front of him to protect him. It is said that after she sustained her twelfth wound, she fell unconscious and the first question she asked when she awoke (a day later in Medina) was “did the Prophet survive?” a testament to her loyalty and commitment to the new faith.

The same article also mentions Khawla b. al-Azwar (d. 639). Another contemporary of the Prophet Muhammad. She is best known for her participation in the Battle of Yarmuk (636) against the Byzantines. According to later narratives of the Islamic conquests, authors described her as having the skill and fighting ability of the famed Muslim general Khālid ibn al-Walīd.

I'm sure that there are many more too but I've found nothing to indicate that women aren't allowed to go to war. Throughout Islamic history there have been women in just about every sphere of life; education, politics, the marketplace, war, scholars, etc.

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