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In the Name of God بسم الله

Trump orders bombing of Syria, Shifts U.S Policy

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Why Trump is bombing Syria, explained in 2 sentences

Updated by Zack Beauchamp@zackbeauchampzack@vox.com  Apr 6, 2017, 11:31pm EDT

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Trump speaks at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, FL, on Thursday, April 6, 2017.  (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Late on Thursday, the United States launched a cruise missile strike against a Syrian regime airbase — the first intentional US strike on Bashar al-Assad’s forces since the Syrian war began in 2011. The strike was in direct response to a chemical weapon attack on the rebel-held town of Khan Sheikhoun on Tuesday, which killed at least 85 civilians (23 of whom were children).

After the strike, President Trump spoke to reporters to explain the administration’s reasoning for escalating America’s role in Syria’s war. There were two sentences in the statement that were absolutely critical for understanding why the administration did this, and why they hope it won’t get out of hand:

Tonight, I ordered a targeted military strike on the airfield in Syria from where the chemical attack was launched. It is in the vital national security interest of the United States to prevent and deter the spread of chemical weapons.

What’s crucial here is that Trump’s justification for launching the strike isn’t to end the Syrian civil war, or even to slow down Assad’s killing of his country’s civilians. It is a “targeted” strike designed as punishment for one specific crime: the use of chemical weapons.

 

The core problem with any proposed plan for intervention against Assad has always been the risk that it could get wildly out of hand, dragging the US deeper into the Syrian conflict than it was prepared to go and potentially making the already incredibly complex and bloody war even worse. Any serious intervention in Syria also carried the very real risk of killing Russian soldiers, who are in Syria helping Assad, thus potentially sparking conflict with a powerful, nuclear-armed enemy.

 

The Trump administration is trying to avoid this kind of open-ended commitment. By going out of his way to emphasize that this US strike targeted the exact airbase from where the chemical attack was launched, Trump is making it crystal clear that the strike is designed as a specific punishment for the recent chemical attack — and not a broader effort aimed at striking Assad until he stops bombing civilians or leaves power.

The goal isn’t to stop the bloodshed in Syria, but rather to send a message to Assad (and potentially other rogue states) that chemical weapons use is out of bounds.

 

This is consistent with how Pentagon spokesperson Capt. Jeff Davis described the military’s strategy in an email to press. “The strike was intended to deter the regime from using chemical weapons again,” Davis said. “The use of chemical weapons against innocent people will not be tolerated.”

It’s also how Micah Zenko, an expert on military intervention at the Council on Foreign Relations, interpreted Trump’s comments.

“Trump's statement makes it clear [that] US cruise missile strikes are for enhancing [the] international norm against chemical weapons use, not protecting Syrian civilians,” Zenko tweeted.

The implication here is that Trump has no desire to launch any more strikes unless Assad uses more chemical weapons. If Assad sticks to his normal tactics, and kills children with explosives rather than banned chemicals, then the United States will leave him alone. This attack will, it seems, be a one-off — or at least part of a relatively small battery of punitive strikes.

But limited strikes, historically, don’t always stay limited. We have no idea if this will actually stop Assad from using banned weapons, or what Trump would do if he did. And a sense of “ownership” of the Syrian civil war afterward could lead to even further US escalation.

“Tonight's strikes may deter Assad, compel Russian cooperation with US interests, [and] not lead to deeper US military involvement,” Zenko tweeted. “However, if these rosy scenarios do all occur, it would be almost unprecedented in US military interventions dating back to [1975].”

Trump’s objective appears to be limited. Who knows how long it will stay that way.

 

Source:

http://www.vox.com/2017/4/6/15215132/us-syria-bombing-trump-assad-chemical-weapons

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9 minutes ago, Enlightened Follower said:

Hillary Clinton praises Trump:

 

They are all part of one greater system.

The next leader of Syria will be the Juhtumi. The current government of Yemen, whom I believe to be the Qahtani, will fight the Sufyani when it rises. The Sufyani is most likely an AlQaeda affiliate.

The Sufyani will rise from the desert plains of Syria, the Yamani will be a Twelver Shia army, either in Basra or Yemen (most likely Yemen) and Khorasani will be a man from Samarqand (most likely a Daesh commander who will gain power)

If the Sufyani territory includes AlQaeda in Yemen, then they, after destroyimg the Qahtani, will head for the Yamani, whom they will not be able to defeat.

 

Let's wait this out and pray for the reappearance of the Mahdi (as).

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Same policy for the past 60 years. It'll never change, I think.

Anyone who thinks one election will change America is lying to themselves.

Years of neoconservative influence, the influence of the Military Industrial Complex, the Saudi and Zionist lobbies, and the influence of the Deep state/shadow Government does not fall apart in one election. 

Edited by E.L King
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3 hours ago, E.L King said:

Same policy for the past 60 years. It'll never change, I think.

The entire world apart from a select few countries are under American control and so these policies are supported by them too, and those that don't support them are the ones America wants to fight.

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5 hours ago, Mansur Bakhtiari said:

They are all part of one greater system.

The next leader of Syria will be the Juhtumi. The current government of Yemen, whom I believe to be the Qahtani, will fight the Sufyani when it rises. The Sufyani is most likely an AlQaeda affiliate.

The Sufyani will rise from the desert plains of Syria, the Yamani will be a Twelver Shia army, either in Basra or Yemen (most likely Yemen) and Khorasani will be a man from Samarqand (most likely a Daesh commander who will gain power)

If the Sufyani territory includes AlQaeda in Yemen, then they, after destroyimg the Qahtani, will head for the Yamani, whom they will not be able to defeat.

 

Let's wait this out and pray for the reappearance of the Mahdi (as).

Although I pray for the re-apparence of The mahdi (as), Assad's not going anywhere. Hezbollah and Syria are too strong, they don't take orders from the zionist controlled Neo-cons of the West. 

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^^^^^

It mentions the Juhtumi and Qahtani will be oppressive. This government will be replaced by a worse one, as Trump predicted in 2013, which is the hilarious part.

The Sufyani will oppose the Juhtumi, and so will the Khorasani and Yamani. However, the Sufyani will not be able to defeat the Yamani, for the Yamani is the only guided one of all these. 

Then again, regardless we must oppose oppression everywhere, ehich is why I support Hezbollah 100%

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