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Laayla

Tagouri "Honored" to be on X-Rated Magazine

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Bismehe Ta3ala,

Assalam Alikum Brothers and Sisters,

Why are some girls so desperate to get attention and to be the talk of the town?  What was Noor Tagouri thinking to use an adult magazine as a platform for her ideas?  I didn't read her article because my internet access denies me to go on and visit this particular website due to sexual content.

If you gave me all the money in the world to have any of my work featured on any immoral and degrading publication I would spit on you.  Why are these girls selling themselves short and classless? 

Everytime I say to myself I've seen it all, there is always another kook who proves me wrong.  My hijab is not for sale and it is not for the highest bidder.  My hijab is sacred and precious. 

Tagouri you defiled your handkerchief but you can never touch my hijab. You will not degrade the hijab of Sayyida Fatymah and Sayyida Zaynab.  You have no inkling of what hijab represents or what it stands for.   Shame on you and your mother who supported and motivated you to publish your work on Hugh Hefner's magazine.  There is a million and one ways to have your message read , but of all places you choose a publication of filth known for denigrating women.  Who did you please the most by going this route?  How do you allow non mahram men who are interested in gazing and looking at flesh to look at you in a sexual way?  You sold yourself cheaply for what exactly?  You have no shame or honor and you didn't serve Islam or Muslim women you served your nafis and shaitain. 

https://themuslimvibe.com/featured/why-as-muslims-we-cant-support-noor-tagouris-decision-to-feature-in

M3 Salamah, FE AMIN Allah

@LabaikYaHussain I wasn't able to read your post because my original thread was removed due to the name of the publication.  Insh'Allah you can repost what you said.  God bless you.

 

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As a sane, adult woman, she is free to do whatever she wants I suppose. 

personally though? I find her desperation for validation via clearly haram means completely repulsive. May Allah guide her. a Hijabi on the page next to naked women?

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Where is she from? Hope she aint Shia. 

When i was younger i always thought hijabis have a strong faith and guts to go out wearing a hijab. 

 

Now some hijabis behave so dispicable its actually disgusting. Tbh it goes to show that wearing a hijab doesnt necessarly mean they are religious. Religion is both an outward expression and an inward one. 

 

It seems like nowadays you have a lot of people that have only memorised the outwardness of it. Due to their weak beliefs and their own version you see these kind of stuff. Tbh it can only get worse.

 

gone are the amr be marouf nahya az monkar. Its all about its my life i will do as i like and dont care about others. My own western version of islam. 

Girls like her are mentaly unstable and do more damage to the deen then anything else. 

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1 hour ago, Maverick1 said:

Where is she from? Hope she aint Shia. 

When i was younger i always thought hijabis have a strong faith and guts to go out wearing a hijab. 

No, she isn't Shia. 

Now some hijabis behave so dispicable its actually disgusting. Tbh it goes to show that wearing a hijab doesnt necessarly mean they are religious. Religion is both an outward expression and an inward one. 

Plenty of men, women, hijabi, non-hijabi, shorts-wearing, shirtless picture taking people are "dispicable." Obviously a garment doesn't necessarily mean anyone is religious. Just like a kufi/turban doesn't.

It seems like nowadays you have a lot of people that have only memorised the outwardness of it. Due to their weak beliefs and their own version you see these kind of stuff. Tbh it can only get worse.

 

gone are the amr be marouf nahya az monkar. Its all about its my life i will do as i like and dont care about others. My own western version of islam. 

Girls like her are mentaly unstable and do more damage to the deen then anything else. 

Mentally unstable? Do you know Noor personally? What if she admits that she made a mistake? Have some mercy on your SISTER.

 

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13 minutes ago, AnotherShepherd said:

Plenty of men, women, hijabi, non-hijabi, shorts-wearing, shirtless picture taking people are "dispicable." Obviously a garment doesn't necessarily mean anyone is religious. Just like a kufi/turban doesn't.

This is understandable, but the reason why people are reacting strongly to this particular story on social media is because of the paradox of "flaunting modesty" on such a magazine.

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As ridiculous as it is to accept a piece with Playboy magazines (of all periodicals), it's obvious that Noor is a popular hijabi in a world where the way of the muhajjabah is not the primary mode of dress.

Regardless of what is religiously OBJECTIVE, Noor is SUBJECTIVELY modest in comparison to her peers, Playboy, the Western world etc.

I'm not trying to "defend her honor" nor am I trying to "shame" her. Her mistake is hers, may Allah have mercy on ALL OF US. Especially the Inquisitors. God knows our hearts.

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Bismehe Ta3ala,

Assalam Alikum.

Mistakes have consequences.  Who cares about popularity on Day of Judgement?  Three other women had the decency and self respect to turn down that filth, yet she took the bait.  It is beyond my understanding why she would put herself in such a medium to expose her face and body to a network of non mahram men who will look at her sexually. 

She is a disgrace and undignified and I'm responsible of my words.  When she puts herself in the public eye and exposes herself to the world she will be criticized for her actions.  It's one thing what she does behind closed doors it's a whole different ball game when she puts herself in the limelight. 

M3 Salamah, FE AMIN Allah

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A number of the death threats are coming directly from Lebanon, after a series of conservative newspapers criticized her No. 1 ranking. Khalifa takes pride in her Lebanese heritage, with an Arabic tattoo of the Lebanese national anthem and another tattoo of the Lebanese Forces cross, the symbol of a Lebanese conservative Christian political party. She has also commented on social and political issues pertaining to Lebanon.

Many of the death threats focused on an adult film in which she appears in traditional Muslim garb. Mia Khalifa, who is not Muslim, told the Washington Post such scenes are “satirical.”


Read more at http://www.inquisitr.com/1738427/mia-khalifa-lebanon-born-adult-film-star-responds-to-death-threats-says-she-wont-back-down/#G68zsFAduh8mo7Br.99

 

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When something has a reputation you wouldnt go towards it do you. 

Do you for example go to q club with a hijab to show modesty?or muslim woman exist? 

In Islam you cant associate yourself with filth, you distance yourself from it  here shes gone running into the arms of the devil  thats going to stick to her for the rest of her life the ignorant that was featured on this filth of a magazine  

She just sold herself cheap nothing but a pice of meat to the eyes of the readers.

I do feel sorry for her parents. 

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Salam,

The girl is trying to raise awareness and the visibility of veiled Muslim women to a new audience. She did not pose in any provocative way and the interview is not vulgar but very humanizing. And Playboy stopped publishing pictures of naked women. Also, Muhammad Ali and Malxom X have been interviewed and profiled in Playboy 

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59 minutes ago, Maverick1 said:

When something has a reputation you wouldnt go towards it do you. 

Do you for example go to q club with a hijab to show modesty?or muslim woman exist? 

In Islam you cant associate yourself with filth, you distance yourself from it  here shes gone running into the arms of the devil  thats going to stick to her for the rest of her life the ignorant that was featured on this filth of a magazine  

She just sold herself cheap nothing but a pice of meat to the eyes of the readers.

I do feel sorry for her parents

This says it all for me.

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55 minutes ago, Sawa said:

Salam,

The girl is trying to raise awareness and the visibility of veiled Muslim women to a new audience. She did not pose in any provocative way and the interview is not vulgar but very humanizing. And Playboy stopped publishing pictures of naked women. Also, Muhammad Ali and Malxom X have been interviewed and profiled in Playboy 

Ah, yes the most often repeated statements.  Here ya go.
Hussain Makke

A comparison is being made between Noor Taghouri’s interview with playboy and Malcolm X’s interview with playboy, in that there has been a backlash when it came to Tagouri’s interview because she was a woman. I would like to compare them too as my final say on the matter.

1. Malcolm’s interview was held in 1963, at the pinnacle of his fame. He was having interviews with endless news outlets and holding several mass rallies on a frequent basis. He had nothing to gain in terms of personally furthering himself. Tagouri’s interview is held whilst she is a 22-year old journalist who aims to climb the media ladder. She has much to gain.

2. Alex Haley is the journalist who interviews Malcolm X on behalf of playboy, again, at a time when Malcolm was giving endless interviews. Haley is the same man who worked with Malcolm on the famous ‘Autobiography of Malcolm X’. Tagouri is interviewed by playboy employee Anna Del Gaizo, whom there is no personal relationship with.

3. I believe the fact that she is a woman has something to do with the backlash, yes, but not as simply as it is made out to be. Playboy is famous for the objectification of women. Malcolm talks about Armageddon in his interview with Haley, whilst the title for Tagouri’s article is ‘Media wunderkid Noor Tagouri makes a forceful case for modesty’. A hijabi is interviewed on Playboy about modesty– the industry which has built an empire on the degradation of women. Do you not see the irony?

4. For 12 years Malcolm preached that the white man was the devil as the main speaker for the Nation of Islam. Within a year he had repudiated every stance in that interview. He had completely changed his views following his experience in hajj. Would you say it is reasonable to preach that the white was man the devil for 12 years? Malcolm corrected his mistakes, but this is an important point, because not EVERTYTHING a respectable personality does is justified. Ultimately, you cannot justify a hijabi in playboy because ‘Malcolm did it’.

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21 minutes ago, starlight said:

Why are we still discussing her? 

To vent frustrations usually. 

People are struggling to do right in their lives, learn their religion, and showcase their faith properly to others around them. There's a strong feeling that cases like these, hounded by a relentless media machine that paints them in a positive light --undermine their efforts, make their voice irrelevant, and sell their identity to the highest bidder. Unfortunately, when one member does something deplorable, it "drags" the rest of us down and makes people feel like we're taking more steps backward. It makes our community members frustrated, and they vent to a receptive audience here.

Edited by magma

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Guest silasun

Great, I am sure Muslim women feel very confident now that they have Hugh Heffner on their side.

Who needs safety from Islamophobic abuse, denial from work and constant lies spread in the media when you have "hijabis" in Playboy magazine.

I don't want to live on this planet anymore......

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4 hours ago, Sawa said:

The girl is trying to raise awareness and the visibility of veiled Muslim women to a new audience. She did not pose in any provocative way and the interview is not vulgar but very humanizing. And Playboy stopped publishing pictures of naked women. Also, Muhammad Ali and Malxom X have been interviewed and profiled in Playboy 

Malcolm X, who I love, is not our criteria for what is good or bad, especially pre-Hajj Malcolm X. I would have advised him not to do the interview. But as Laayla pointed out, Alex Haley is the one who interviewed Malcolm, and he was a personal friend of Malcolm and the one who compiled his autobiography. It's also a very different context: Malcolm was talking human rights and civil liberties, Noor is talking about her career. Noor is a woman who was approached only for her hijab (read post #3), probably to push some kind of deranged hijab fetish. It's a magazine that objectifies women, and so appearing on the magazine as a woman is a bit different than appearing as a political figure.

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Bismehe Ta3ala,

Brother Qa'im, Assalam Alikum.

The credit goes to brother Hussain Makke as I indicated above.  My response was only in bold the rest of the post belongs to Sayyid Hussain Makke.

In other news, in Lebanon we have our own problems.

This video clip was produced by a Sheikh's daughter.  God help us where this ummah is heading. 


الشيخ حسان عبد الله
September 23 at 8:59pm ·

جميل جدا وافتخر ان ابنتي زينب من بين من ساهم في هذا العمل مع الشكر للجميع فالنص رائع والاداء الانشادي ممتاز والمشاهد منتقاة بدقة والتمثيل معبر وفقكم الله لاعمال ملتزمة اكثر واكثر

M3 Salamah, FE AMIN Alla

 

 

Edited by Laayla

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Absolutely disgusting and disgraceful... end times...

I wonder how far the mercy of the Imam(ajf) is going to stretch when he returns and absolute divine judgement with him and when the kill command comes.

I cannot stress enough how extremely important it is that all muslims openly condemn this.

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Guest silasun

Question is: if there was a Muslim man who openes a risque fashion magazine with "hijabis" in it, would there be such support for him as being "honourable" for "defending hijab". Or would he be labelled (rightly) a dirty pervert? 

We need to lose the double standards and be fair both in treatment and criticisms of both Muslim men and women.

And we also need to be aware of such attacks against Muslims. On the one hand, the conservative media labels us all as terrorists. On the other, the more liberal media sources (owned by the same people/with comparable politcal agendas to the conservative ones) spend their time indoctronating us with a "fashionable Islam suited for a debauched Hollywood set".

We need to know who our enemies are.

Edited by silasun

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16 hours ago, Laayla said:

Bismehe Ta3ala,

Brother Qa'im, Assalam Alikum.

The credit goes to brother Hussain Makke as I indicated above.  My response was only in bold the rest of the post belongs to Sayyid Hussain Makke.

In other news, in Lebanon we have our own problems.

This video clip was produced by a Sheikh's daughter.  God help us where this ummah is heading. 


الشيخ حسان عبد الله
September 23 at 8:59pm ·

جميل جدا وافتخر ان ابنتي زينب من بين من ساهم في هذا العمل مع الشكر للجميع فالنص رائع والاداء الانشادي ممتاز والمشاهد منتقاة بدقة والتمثيل معبر وفقكم الله لاعمال ملتزمة اكثر واكثر

M3 Salamah, FE AMIN Alla

 

 

Are you saying that video clip/or it's message is bad 

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Bismehe Ta3ala,

Assalam Alikum.

Brother it is problematic in all levels.  The 3bayat al rais is sacred it is the thawb of Sayyida Fatymah and Sayyida Zaynab.  The girl who is on the video doesn't even wear it in real life.

I ask you if you liked the message could have it been recited without her being in the video in the first place? 

M3 Salamah, FE AMIN Allah

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Guest silasun

For those of you who don't, I would strongly recommend following the career of one of our UK brothers who is a journalist at Channel 4, Assed Baig. Somebody who works in media without selling their dignity.

Here is what he had to say:

 

Screenshot_2016-09-29-07-00-49-1.png

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Bismehe Ta3ala,

Assalam Alikum Brothers and Sisters.

Best response I've read so far, Mash'Allah.  God bless our sister Fatemah Meghji, excellent job sister.

M3 Salamah, FE AMIN Allah

 

Fatemah Meghji

Fatemah Meghji refuses to be apologetic about believing in God. She lives on Unceded Coast Salish Territories (known to the colonized as Vancouver, Canada).
 

An Open Letter to Noor Tagouri

I begin in the name of Allah, the rahman, the rahim,

Assalamu Alaykum,

To my sister Noor, I ask you to take this letter in the spirit that it is intended — as your sister in faith who loves and cares for you. Final judgement lies with the Almighty, Who is more merciful to us than we are to one another; it is no person’s place to condemn you to hell, or to strip you of your God-given dignity. Through this letter, I only seek to open up a dialogue for all of us to reconsider our assumptions, and to think about the consequences of the path that our ummah is taking. I’m not writing this letter to you because I think you’re unworthy; but precisely because you are.

Before I begin, I want to tell you that I get it. Like you, I wanted to pursue a career in story-telling and journalism. As a child, I wrote and illustrated short, fantastical stories of a young hijabi who saved the world. I even applied to and was accepted into a prestigious journalism program (I didn’t end up going, but I digress). I wanted to take the media back, not necessarily to represent hijabis or even Muslims, but to speak truth to power, to rebel against, and subvert a broken system. I am coming from a place of empathy, a girl who was bullied through most of elementary school for donning the hijab. I know what it’s like to want to be heard, and to want to normalize hijab so that no girl has to struggle with her identity, and face anti-Islamic bigotry.

I don’t think that being interviewed in Playboy will help that. Playboy, and institutions like it, have an agenda to re-brand themselves as all-inclusive paragons of liberalism. They specifically sought out a hijabi woman. Sometimes, it’s not about us; it’s our hijab that makes us valuable tokens of diversity. The headline made a grandiose statement that you make a convincing case for modesty. I read the interview carefully, and the interview itself mentioned nothing about modesty, God, or Islam. Did they cut it out, tokenizing modesty and our faith as buzzwords in their headline?

If you are going to be featured in an interview that tokenizes you (and us) for your hijab in a magazine that is infamous for degrading women, the least you can do is call them out for it. We need to make a real case, truly for modesty, not by our mere presence in the room. We can’t strike a pose in our hijab for a magazine that profits off of sexually provocative images of women posing for the male gaze; we can be fully covered and still objectified and taken advantage of.

Perhaps the strongest line of defense has been that nobody is below talking to. In principle, I agree. But the platform that we choose to talk to them on does matter. As the Qur’an says:

وَإِذَا سَمِعُوا اللَّغْوَ أَعْرَضُوا عَنْهُ وَقَالُوا لَنَا أَعْمَالُنَا وَلَكُمْ أَعْمَالُكُمْ سَلَامٌ عَلَيْكُمْ لَا نَبْتَغِي الْجَاهِلِينَ
and when they hear frivolity, they avoid it and say, ‘Our deeds belong to us, and your deeds belong to you. Peace be to you. We do not court the ignorant.’ [28:55]
وَإِذَا مَرُّوا بِاللَّغْوِ مَرُّوا كِرَامًا
and when they come upon frivolity, pass by with dignity. [25:72]

I’m sure that we can agree that Playboy is a place of laghw and frivolity, and a place that degrades women (regardless of nudity). Nevertheless, we need to talk to people of various demographics. People are worth investing in and speaking to. However, people do not only exist looking into the pages of this magazine. Let’s look for them: in our neighbourhoods, in hospitals, in prisons, in the grocery store. Let’s be creative. We are intelligent, principled, unapologetic Muslims, and we can find better mediums than this. And we will.

There’s a growing movement right now of Muslims who want to be seen; they want to be visible, represented, and heard. We want visibility for hijabi women on the news, on the catwalk, and in sports. But why? Is this in and of itself a virtue? Representation means nothing — what matters is what we do with that representation. If we are going to be hijabis in the media who do nothing to speak truth to power, then where is our value?

Being heard has no value unless we are speaking truth. Being visible has no value unless we are worth being seen. Being a hijabi on the news is not intrinsically admirable. Being a hijabi on the catwalk promoting consumption, brand names, materialism, and capitalism is not valuable. Representation in and of itself in oppressive institutions, infrastructures, and frameworks is not valuable. Breaking barriers when they are your principles is not laudable. This brings us backwards, not forward. It is regress, not progress.

What is valuable is principled women, subverting systems of oppression, and ethical women, dedicated to God and God alone. We get our values from Allah and He never told us to seek representation in and of itself. He told us to fight for what is good, to condemn what is evil, and to fight for the souls of our brothers and sisters.

We live in a world where Muslim women are being commodified in a fashion industry that promotes the consumption of our bodies. We live in a world where materialism is rampant and consumption is at unprecedented levels. We live in a world obsessed with images and the dunya — the low and base. We live in a world where human value is determined by profit and aesthetic appeal. And instead of subverting the system by asserting that these are irrelevant, we assimilate into an objectifying culture. We embrace what oppresses us, becoming the perfect victim. I beg you to think about this, and to understand where the dissent against your decision is coming from. Playboy profits from this, and by merely existing in their pages, we are not subverting the objectification that they espouse. Donning a headscarf is not tantamount to a true rejection of objectification. Let’s not allow objectification and modesty to become buzzwords in our vocabulary.

For those who find this conversation a waste of time, and believe that we have bigger problems to deal with: The very foundation of our community is in our values and unashamed God-centric morality and ethics. The real battle is within. Our connection to God is our only true source of value.

Noor, I pray that if you do become the first hijabi anchorwoman in the US, that you are not celebrated as the first hijabi in Playboy. I pray that you are celebrated as someone who ended up making a powerful case for modesty by changing her tracks and subverting a system that objectifies, uses, and profits from the degradation of female bodies.

With prayers and love,

Your sister

https://medium.com/@fate7a/an-open-letter-to-noor-taghouri-c85c4fd1e634#.mtpxpk5u2

 

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Salam…I know, right?

As much as I would have liked for the world to see things through a different lens, that hasn’t been the case and unfortunately, silence perpetuates a bigger problem from which truth seemingly becomes irrelevant. So here I am, writing to address the “controversy” that I seemingly started but more importantly, to thank those of you that maintained respect whether you agreed or disagreed with my decision.

A few months ago, I was contacted by Playboy. The magazine was celebrating “seven cultural rule breakers who are changing the way we think, dress and more,” and I was one of them. I know, the namesake alone is enough to make anyone gawk at the thought of a Muslim woman in a hijab being included in its pages. I’ll admit, when I was initially approached by the publication, I was nervous and unsure if I should take the interview. I knew that Playboy had overhauled the look of the magazine and took out the nudity; that was great but it wasn’t enough. This wasn’t a decision that I could take lightly. I spent time talking to my family and mentors, praying about it, and asking the writers a ton of questions. While doing my research, I learned that the magazine was committed to putting social justice and cultural progress at the forefront of their mission. It may sound wrong and it may make you uncomfortable to associate Playboy with social justice and cultural progress, but that’s what I do. I break the rules, I allow myself to step out of my comfort zone and make people uncomfortable along the way. That personal “rebellion” is a form of honesty; it’s about being your most authentic self and living up to the meaning of Noor (“Light” in Arabic).

We are taught that our beloved prophets came to those who were broken, struggling and in places of darkness. They never believed that their message was too good for any audience and neither should we. We live in a struggling society that so desperately needs to see our light; a society that needs to hear our voice.

So I did it. I participated in the interview; On my terms. I wore what I wanted, I stood for what I believed in and I was unapologetically myself. I can proudly say that I have no regrets. A fully clothed 22-year old Muslim American Libyan Woman took an iconic magazine and used it to spread a positive and much needed message. I did what so many women with inspiring messages of hope would have been uncomfortable doing because success for a woman is often predicated on what society deems appropriate for us to succeed in.

I didn’t do it for those who perpetuate this notion that if something a woman does isn’t aligned with how you would have liked to see it done you’re justified in attacking her character, morals and religious beliefs. This microscopic scrutiny and bullying that women are subjected to on a consistent basis is not only toxic, it’s also detrimental to our communities. It needs to stop.

I did it for Muslims, for women, and for everyone misrepresented in mainstream media today. I did it for young women everywhere that are struggling with their identity and feel misunderstood. I did it for the 10,000 who came before me that were bullied in private or publicly humiliated because they didn’t conform to societal standards of how a woman should present herself. I did it so that the 10,000 who come after me will reclaim their power to kick down closed doors and break through glass ceilings. I did it for YOU, the person who read the interview and thought it was inspirational, the person who was confused, the person who was disappointed in me and the person who wasn’t sure what to think. I did it to demonstrate that there is nothing more powerful than a woman being unapologetically herself and standing firm in what she believes — no matter who is listening.

http://noortagouri.com/

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4 hours ago, Sawa said:

I did it for Muslims, for women, and for everyone misrepresented in mainstream media today. I did it for young women everywhere that are struggling with their identity and feel misunderstood. I did it for the 10,000 who came before me that were bullied in private or publicly humiliated because they didn’t conform to societal standards of how a woman should present herself. I did it so that the 10,000 who come after me will reclaim their power to kick down closed doors and break through glass ceilings. I did it for YOU, the person who read the interview and thought it was inspirational, the person who was confused, the person who was disappointed in me and the person who wasn’t sure what to think. I did it to demonstrate that there is nothing more powerful than a woman being unapologetically herself and standing firm in what she believes — no matter who is listening.

Fair enough, I can see her point about presenting Muslim women in a more positive light but of all the magazines she could have picked, why choose one that is infamous even if it no longer publishes nude pictures? That is not a representation of Muslim women. 

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I read her response above. I admire her spirit and her trying to be involved in the society she lives in and start a conversation, push the envelope and discuss about roles of women, etc, but there is one fatal flaw in her logic which I feel must be pointed out. 

It is true that Rasoulallah was an innovator and that he spoke and interacted with people that didn't agree with him. He was also considered a 'rebel' by many, but he didn't do any of this to promote himself, or to be a rebel just to 'rebel' or to push the envelope just to 'push the envelope'. He did all of these things with a single goal, and that was to spread out the Message of Allah(s.w.a) to humanity. From this perspective, the 'what' of what he did was secondary to the 'why' of what he did. 

It seems to me that the sister needs to ask herself the question, 'Why' ? 

Why am I telling stories, pushing the envelope, being a rebel ? Why am I being being provocative ? Why am I doing journalism ? What is my goal and my purpose behind it ? Is it to promote myself and my ideas, or is it to promote the goals and ideals of Islam ? In some cases, there may be a concordance between the two, but in other cases there may not be, and when there isn't then which one you follow will tell you the 'why' of why you are doing it. You will only know in case there is a conflict between the two. 

She should ask herself if Fatima(a.s) or Sayyeda Mariam(a.s), Mother of Jesus was alive and wanted to spread the message of Islam(of the which the hijab is part of this message), would they associate themselves with an organization such as Playboy in order to do it ? If the answer is no, then she should ask herself why she is pursuing a different course from the women she takes, or should take as her role models, as a muslima, and a hijabi. 

And Allah(s.w.a) is truely merciful. The door of repentance is wide open. An error doesn't become a mistake unless you fail to learn from it. 

 

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What's the point of hijab if you appear on a magazine like Playboy to be "accepted" in the West? 

What's next? Topless women with a hijab on? Well, this image already has a long history in the Arabian Nights imagination of the Orientalists. 

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4 minutes ago, Marbles said:

What's the point of hijab if you appear on a magazine like Playboy to be "accepted" in the West? 

What's next? Topless women with a hijab on? Well, this image already has a long history in the Arabian Nights imagination of the Orientalists. 

This. 

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