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In the Name of God بسم الله

France bans the burkini

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Guest silasun

@The Batman I even asked Sh. Shomali, rep of Ayatollah Khamenei, about "mixed gyms". He said if I recall correctly that if the people are dressed normally the  it is fine.

Beaches are often places of debauchery, obviously. But e.g. in the winter a beach =/= beach in summer- it is practically the same as any garden in the town.

The word "unisex" in the fatwa needs clarification- otherwise basically our presence in this world is haraam (even if we were in Qom or Najaf our presence would be haraam lol). 

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Last night I had dinner at a halal restaurant with relatives of mine, and they invited a couple of friends who are Catholic. They were talking about this burkini swimming suit news. The lady said she

Bismehe Ta3ala, Assalam Alikum. If you are an observant Muslimah, you don't go to mixed beaches.  Just avoid going to the beach all together so you wouldn't have to remove your clothing.  It

But France claims to be an inclusive secular liberal democracy, others don't. So really we're judging France by its own purported standards.  You're right, it's their country and their laws. But

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Obviously "free-mixing" is not allowed in Islam. That is not the same as meeting with members of the opposite gender for a legitimate purpose.

I even asked about attending mixed wedding- it is OK as long as there is no free mixing.

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@notme

I remember reading, maybe just obligatory precaution, something along the lines of "men have to cover what the men of the society usually cover as minimal". So in the west it might extend to a t-shirt and a pair of knee length shorts. I take it that a women is only allowed to look at those parts.

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1 hour ago, silasun said:

@notme

I remember reading, maybe just obligatory precaution, something along the lines of "men have to cover what the men of the society usually cover as minimal". So in the west it might extend to a t-shirt and a pair of knee length shorts. I take it that a women is only allowed to look at those parts.

That makes perfect sense given that Muslims aren't allowed to make themselves ridiculous, but it has nothing to do with minimal requirements for hijab. 

In cultures where women wear niqab, is it haram for men to look at the face of women who do not? 

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I agree that in western countries there is "freedom" but maybe freedom for doing sinful things, if you plan to behave like God says, that's forbidden. In usa you can go out naked if you want, you can dress with a spandex suits that cover you all, even the face, if you want, but if you go out with the burka, it's the end of the world.

Let's suppose a woman that is non-muslim and Try going to an interview dressing in a very modesty way (but a lot, like a skirt that goes to the knee) would she get the job? I guess no for the way she dresses.

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@notme Sayed Khamenei:

"Men's Clothes
It is not mandatory that a man covers his head, neck, face and arms up to the place that men do not usually cover.

A man is not obliged to cover more than his private areas. But, if he knows that non-maḥram women are looking at his body, it is an obligatory caution to cover all parts except for those parts that men usually uncover."

If you see Sayed Sistani ruling on looking at non-Muslim woman, he says it is allowed to look at the part customsrily uncovered.

Interesting what you say about niqab. I do not think that is the case because I have looked at Sayed Sistani's book and did not find anything which suggests that- it just seems to be allowed to look at face and hands

 

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3 hours ago, Nataly said:

I agree that in western countries there is "freedom" but maybe freedom for doing sinful things, if you plan to behave like God says, that's forbidden. In usa you can go out naked if you want, you can dress with a spandex suits that cover you all, even the face, if you want, but if you go out with the burka, it's the end of the world.

Let's suppose a woman that is non-muslim and Try going to an interview dressing in a very modesty way (but a lot, like a skirt that goes to the knee) would she get the job? I guess no for the way she dresses.

No, you can't go naked in the US. You can wear short skirts and midriff baring tops, but you have to cover "private parts", i. e. buttocks, groin area, breasts. So yes, nearly naked, almost as naked as Islam allows for men, but not naked.

And yes, a modestly dressed non-hijabi would be offered the job in the US. In professional type jobs, an immodestly dressed woman would not be hired. In fact, a hijabi is discriminated against, sometimes subtly, sometimes blatantly, but if she changes nothing of her clothing except to remove the head covering, she would be hired. 

I have no idea about in France though.

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1 minute ago, Sister Shia said:

Buttocks don't have to be covered in the U.S. Just a little string needs to be in between the buttocks.

Maybe that's true in some areas, but not in areas where I've lived (East coast, south, and Midwest.) These clothing laws are generally local, not state or national. 

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Accept it as it is. In Saudi Arabia and Iran you are required to dress modestly as that's the law even for non-Muslims and tourists.

If you don't like simple don't go to France. I don't necessarily agree with their ban but nevertheless I respect it as its their country and their laws.

In the end it works both ways. You can't have it your way every time.

 

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11 minutes ago, Zendegi said:

Accept it as it is. In Saudi Arabia and Iran you are required to dress modestly as that's the law even for non-Muslims and tourists.

If you don't like simple don't go to France. I don't necessarily agree with their ban but nevertheless I respect it as its their country and their laws.

In the end it works both ways. You can't have it your way every time.

 

But France claims to be an inclusive secular liberal democracy, others don't. So really we're judging France by its own purported standards. 

You're right, it's their country and their laws. But perhaps they should label themselves as something different, or at least put an asterisk. 

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There is a difference between telling people to wear clothing or telling them to remove clothing. There is a big difference in saying someone has to put on a tie to be served in a restaurant or to have to take their shirts off. What do you suggest the French Muslims who are French do? It's a problem the way women in hijab are treated in France. I avoid the French airport when traveling. They tried to pull my pants legs up in front of all kinds of men and I kept pushing them right back  down.  The real question is why should women be told they must remove clothing to partake in society? I remember when women were fighting for the right to wear pants to work instead of short dresses and panty hose. A non muslim girl can wear a long skirt to school but not a muslim girl?  This is stinkn thinkin.

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12 hours ago, notme said:

If there is a restriction on women seeing shirtless men, why is a man's awra only his buttocks and groin area? 

I've got no problem with gender segregated beaches, though it certainly would put a damper on family fun to have only gender segregated beaches. But wouldn't it make more sense to restrict what Muslim men wear rather than not allowing women to family beaches? (Do you really see Muslimas going crazy over shirtless non-Muslims? I've never seen it, though I have seen men stare at non-Muslim women regardless of what they wear.)

All this means is that a man are not obligated to cover themselves. So for example, boxers box without a shirt, and they are not sinning. But the women who watch boxing are sinning.

Quote

The Imamis differentiate between the parts of other person body which can be looked at and those parts of one’s own body which ought to be covered. They observe: It is wajib for a male to cover only his rear and private parts, though it is wajib for women who are not his maharim to abstain from looking at any part of his body except his head and hands (up to the wrist).

https://www.al-islam.org/shiite-encyclopedia-ahlul-bayt-dilp-team/rules-modesty-according-five-islamic-schools-law

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12 hours ago, silasun said:

@The Batman I even asked Sh. Shomali, rep of Ayatollah Khamenei, about "mixed gyms". He said if I recall correctly that if the people are dressed normally the  it is fine.

Beaches are often places of debauchery, obviously. But e.g. in the winter a beach =/= beach in summer- it is practically the same as any garden in the town.

The word "unisex" in the fatwa needs clarification- otherwise basically our presence in this world is haraam (even if we were in Qom or Najaf our presence would be haraam lol). 

I believe there is a difference between Sayyed Khamenei and Sayyed al-Sistanis rulings. Look here:

Quote

السؤال: هل يجوز للرجل المسلم الذهاب الي المسابح المختلطة؟

الجواب: لا يجوز للرجل المسلم الذهاب الى المسابح المختلطة ، وبقية الأماكن الخلاعية الأخرى إذا استتِبع حراماً ، بل الأحوط وجوباً تركه حتى لولم يستتبع حراماً.

http://www.sistani.org/arabic/qa/search/50412/

This is why going to mixed gyms according to Sayyed al-Sistani is not allowed (based on obligatory precaution), because according to the Sayyed being in the places of 'khila'iyya' is an issue in and of itself.

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12 hours ago, magma said:

But France claims to be an inclusive secular liberal democracy, others don't. So really we're judging France by its own purported standards. 

You're right, it's their country and their laws. But perhaps they should label themselves as something different, or at least put an asterisk. 

It is very clearly defined. France is unique in this regard from most European and Western countries. There is a French concept of "Laicite" which is a strict separation of religion with politics and society, with state endorsed secularism where it went as far as:

  • removing the religious character from the judicial oath and religious symbols from courtrooms
  • forbidding the participation of the military in religious processions
  • the introduction of divorce and compulsory civil marriages
  • ordering soldiers not to frequent religious clubs
  • making seminarians and priests subject to conscription in the military
  • legalizing work on Sundays

The problem with you is that you are not looking at the issue from the context of France. When they talk about secularism over there it doesn't necessarily mean equality for every religious person regardless if their Muslim, Jewish, Christian or any other religion. The extreme proponents of Secularism in France think religion overall is an attack and stain on secularism.

Secularism has been closely followed after the separation of church and state after the French Revolution and the 1905 Law that established it as a principle of the French Republic. The relationship between the French political institutions and the Catholic Church the religion the French have historically followed haven't been that great since the late 18th Century and even till now.

Overall France is not a religious country, chooses not to be one and therefore has chosen to take a more decisive stance on religion and religious people in general. Overall it sucks to be a religious person in France.

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1 hour ago, Zendegi said:

Overall France is not a religious country, chooses not to be one and therefore has chosen to take a more decisive stance on religion and religious people in general. Overall it sucks to be a religious person in France.

This is all whitewashing, and giving them too much credit, as if they are meticulously and consistently following an ironclad principle, philosophically sound and free of any inherent contradictions.

Even if we all agree it's practically unsound, we can make the case further that it's theoretically unsound. What constitutes "religion" anyway? Does context matter or not? And what authority does the French state have in designating what is a "religious symbol" and what's not? 

The reality is decisions are made selectively, yet haphazardly and impulsively, within the context of fear, paranoia, hate, spite, and confusion within a sociological and geopolitical context. There's nothing fanciful about it. New age religion, Satanic symbols, I'm sure would all be fine. Even though they would be "religious symbols", they don't elicit the same above reactions and actions. Warranted or not?

Again, the state can put whatever laws it wants, but we have the right to question their foundation. In the meantime, the lives of real people are impacted, in both big and small ways. 

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photo_2016-08-25_15-48-20.jpg@yusur317

Bismehe Ta3ala,

This is a backward ancient cultural "costum" (that is only islamically required off of the prophet's wives. I believe it was specifically sent to warn aisha- God knows what the future holds). 

Please explain this sentence.  I don't want to respond to you before I make sure I know what you are referring about.

Allah youstour

M3 Salamah, FE AMIN Allah

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2 hours ago, Laayla said:

photo_2016-08-25_15-48-20.jpg@yusur317

Bismehe Ta3ala,

This is a backward ancient cultural "costum" (that is only islamically required off of the prophet's wives. I believe it was specifically sent to warn aisha- God knows what the future holds). 

Please explain this sentence.  I don't want to respond to you before I make sure I know what you are referring about.

Allah youstour

M3 Salamah, FE AMIN Allah

Salam 

I think 'backward' may have been a strong word. But it's an injust, oppressive costum.  

If you look at quran 33:33, it says : 

And abide in your houses and do not display yourselves as [was] the display of the former times of ignorance. And establish prayer and give zakah and obey Allah and His Messenger. Allah intends only to remove from you the impurity [of sin], O people of the [Prophet's] household, and to purify you with [extensive] purification.

That seems like God is telling every women to stay in their house. But really, if you look at the verse before it, it says: 

O wives of the Prophet, you are not like anyone among women. If you fear Allah , then do not be soft in speech [to men], lest he in whose heart is disease should covet, but speak with appropriate speech.

So, it is speaking to the prophet's wives. Aisha left her home and took up arms against the then caliph imam Ali (a.s.). She's actually the reason behind the name- Battle of the Camel. This is what I meant when I said, God knows what the future holds. In this case, it isn't oppressive because the prophet's wives (as mentioned in the quran) are different to the common women. Going into the marriage, they must expect different treatment and judgement on the Day. They were closest to God through the messenger himself! Leaving their homes would pose a risk to their lives too, not to mention costums then were different. 

I hope this clears things up? :) 

 

@Laayla, I'd like to apologise for my tone and reaction. I don't know how not going to the beach would equate to staying home. Now that I have a second read, I don't know how i deduced that. You didn't say this, and to be honest, I do think we are better off avoiding beaches where people expose their awras. I was being an emotional mess. I reacted the way I did because of an experience I had myself at the beach. I do own a burkini, but it's tight so I don't wear it. Anyway, men can be in shorts and go out swimming as they please. My brother swims in only shorts, my dad no longer swims (but used to swim in shorts and a tank top- mostly because of his form). All I wanted to do is have the waves hit my feet. So I took off my socks and walked towards the water. My dad was quickly to react "Oh! Yusur*! What is this?! This is haram...!" If there was a table, I would've flipped it. But of course with him being my dad I just stuck with my sarcasm "Ooooh! Hot right? Look at my feeeet! The world is going to stop just to see Yusur* Surname's feet! Where the paparazzi at?!" He, like always, just responded with "Up to you." So I walked to the water... aaaaaaaaaaaaaaand it sucked. Because what he said ruined my mood and I kept wondering why God made it so diffuclt for us. But then my mum joined me :clap: And we took pictures and had fun :verryhappy: I usually stick to sarcasm when people make silly remarks, like "You cycle to uni?! That's haram!" It just makes me want to :furious:  But again, I apologise :blush:

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@yusur317 i think we all hate it when people go haram police mode (especially when they are doing something a bit, erm, un-Islamic -__-) -

With regard to wearing jilbab or abaya/chador dress I think there is lots of evidence for it being good to wear. For example, lots of evidence for Lady Zainab (as) covering her face. I don't think it is oppressive, but rather it may be difficult to wear chador etc in public in the west! It is just another mode of dress which frees a lady up so she is judged for who she is not what she looks like. 

Muslim men aren't supposed to be topless or in tank tops or short-shorts in public lolol. 

Practically, what is expected to be covered by men and women is very similar in Islam, except women cover their hair, neck and feet

Do Muslim women ride bikes a lot? Is it considered culturally innappropriate or is it just revealing? I saw on Instagram a picture of a turbaned Sheikh with his wife on the back of his motorcycle (awesome instagram page btw!).

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3 hours ago, silasun said:

@yusur317 i think we all hate it when people go haram police mode (especially when they are doing something a bit, erm, un-Islamic -__-) -

Agreed =D 

With regard to wearing jilbab or abaya/chador dress I think there is lots of evidence for it being good to wear.

What evidence? I do love wearing them though. It makes me feel spiritual and feminine. But I don't wear them much because I stand out. I only recently realised I had social anxiety (pointed out by qualified mother). I wear abaya when I'm in london and on lazy days when I go on a quick errand. Or when I go to mosque of course! I like long-sleeve maxi dresses though! =D I don't wear them to Uni, since it's mostly hospital placement and I cycle. We're given scrubs there anyway :) 

For example, lots of evidence for Lady Zainab (as) covering her face.

Thankfully, God did not make this obligatory. It is important to strive to be like Lady Zainab (a.s.), but I wouldn't cover my face. 

I don't think it is oppressive, but rather it may be difficult to wear chador etc in public in the west!

It is! If we're talking about face coverage, I assume it's probably difficult in the middle east too. Especially with the association of ISIS. My mother keeps telling me stories of how hard it was living with the hijab in syria during her uni days (late 20th century). A face coverage will take away a lot of opportunities though. You're very limited in what you can do career wise, and even limited to the places you could go too. Plus, it most definitely DOES pose security issues. Is it a man or a woman? I don't know! Face recognition is vital in our communication and sense of security. Lady Zainab probably rarely left her home. Except, when she was forced of course. God commanded the prophet's wives to remain home, perhaps the prophet asked the same of his children? (grandchildren=children). It was a different time then. If all women wore face coverage, I would too. Like said, I don't want to stand out. 

It is just another mode of dress which frees a lady up so she is judged for who she is not what she looks like. 

I feel like I'm starting to sound very negative again, I am sooo sorry! But this is just an excuse. You are most definitely ALWAYS judged based on appearance. It's in our human nature to judge based on appearance. It tells us a lot about the person without having to speak. In a sense, the way you dress communicates things about you. Being judged on your appearance, I think, is literally why muslim women have to wear the hijab. So they're identified as muslim, in order to stand out from among other women. It doesn't protect you nor hide your beauty. Many women in the west are being targeted BECAUSE they're hijabi. Men get away with it, except when they decide to grow out their beard maybe. Though even then, you're less likley to be targeted since it's harder to "bully" or hurt a man. In the middle east, the hijab has never stopped a man from forcing himself on a woman or hurting her. As for hiding beauty, because it allows you to change head/face shape, many women actually look much better with it on. In my opinion, african muslim women tend to look best with a hijab on. Though there are exceptions of course. Most of my friends look much better with it on than without. A bit superficial to think this is a reason for the hijab anyway. I'm not suggesting this is what you believe, but search any site or watch any clip and it's one of the first things you'll see is being used to explain the purpose of a hijab. Going back to what you've said, brother, the amount of times I was overlooked because I wore the hijab is ridiculous! My friends at the time sympathised, but I didn't care. Knowing God will reward me for the extra mile I have to go to break the ice with people, is enough for me. There's just a solid stereotype that hangs over our head, or better said- covers our head. So yes, we are judged on appearance regardless. But you are right in that, in the west (where wearing hijab is not common and is a sign of unavailability), prevents a woman from being objectified. Though muslim men in the west could care less if you wore it or not. You're still catcalled and harrassed. To be honest, it doesn't matter how you look or how you dress. A women is objectified regardless. Have you seen this..? EDIT!!!!! I thought I should add, going back to the face veil, in places like those shown in the video, I'd wear a face veil. I think it would be appropriate to wear one there until men learn to respect. I'd most definitely feel more comfortable with a face veil on. Unless I'm with my baba or brother. I guess it depends on the society? 

 

 

Muslim men aren't supposed to be topless or in tank tops or short-shorts in public lolol. 

I did say that to my dad not long ago, but he said he's never heard of this before. Iranian law is not sharia. He asked for proof. I googled, but the only thing I could find was advise and optional conduct/presentation. Male hijab is to lower their gaze and hide their private parts- that's about it. Hajj is different though, of course. 

Practically, what is expected to be covered by men and women is very similar in Islam, except women cover their hair, neck and feet

Do Muslim women ride bikes a lot? Is it considered culturally innappropriate or is it just revealing? 

Well my cousin's father has undergone extensive studies (though I don't know where). She's learnt this from her father who forbids her and her 3 sisters from cycling. He claims it's haram. He says a lot of things are haram. So I don't think it's a cultural thing? My mother doesn't know how to cycle. She comes from an abusive family, so again- don't think it's to do with culture. My dad tried to teach her many times, but she never got the hang of it. I don't think it's revealing? It's like sitting on a moving stool. Is sitting on a stool revealing? 

I saw on Instagram a picture of a turbaned Sheikh with his wife on the back of his motorcycle (awesome instagram page btw!).

That's so cool! I love how you hyperlinked that too =D Thanks! 

Thanks for responding brother!! =D 

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Just now, Ali al-Abdullah said:

Regardless of what he meant.. This is normalizing it.. why not use a girl?

No it's not. He was trying to prove a point ali. And he did! This is exactly why I have evidence for my claim that it doesn't matter how you look or dress- if you're a women, you'll be objectified. 

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2 minutes ago, Ali al-Abdullah said:

Regardless of what he meant.. This is normalizing it.. why not use a girl?

You do realise many theatre actors both now and long ago, cross dressed in plays...? Even in arabic comedy TV dramas actually. 

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Yusur, of course the only reason for hijab is not lust of men. There is an incredible  Spiritual dimension to it (if you are from UK then you surely know the author- this is one of the best articles I have read for a while and really opened my eyes more).

Re. Hijab of men- according to Ayatollah Khamenei, men have to wear more than just underpants (just no- I am a man and I would get pretty annoyed and maybe snap if I saw some dude around my house with his thighs on show.... yuck). There are also secondary issues at hand- men walking around topless is going to cause a lot of corruption in society- we aren't football hooligans or bodybuilders. So no, it really isn't halal for men to walk around in underpants or shorts only...

Evidence of chador: see quran 33:59. I think it is a general consensus among our juristd that "chador" is best form of hijab. There is I guess evidence from hadiths etc but I haven't seen it but I guess if you look hard or speak Arabic you could find it. Obviously you don't have to wear it and it is maybe Islamically preferable to wear Western clothes in many situations to avoid bad attention/consequences.

Sorry, there are a tonne of things about hijab and woman that men will.never understand so I might sound a bit confrontational- excuse my ignorance but my understanding of fashion doesn't extend far beyond how to use my beard trimmer:

Surely if hijab makes you look more attractive then you are doing it wrong? Or do you mean look better but not more objectified. I guess that a person can look better not more objectified with hijab? Is that what you mean?

Bicycles: in certain countries like Iraq it is a definite no-no because we aren't- men and women- meant to attract unwanted attention to ourselves. I guess it comes down to applicatio  of the principle laws to how you use it. Knowing how Muslims like to backbite, I wouldn't want my female family members to ride a bike even if it is halal by itself... and I live in the West lol.

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12 hours ago, Zendegi said:

It is very clearly defined. France is unique in this regard from most European and Western countries. There is a French concept of "Laicite" which is a strict separation of religion with politics and society, with state endorsed secularism where it went as far as:

  • removing the religious character from the judicial oath and religious symbols from courtrooms
  • forbidding the participation of the military in religious processions
  • the introduction of divorce and compulsory civil marriages
  • ordering soldiers not to frequent religious clubs
  • making seminarians and priests subject to conscription in the military
  • legalizing work on Sundays

The problem with you is that you are not looking at the issue from the context of France. When they talk about secularism over there it doesn't necessarily mean equality for every religious person regardless if their Muslim, Jewish, Christian or any other religion. The extreme proponents of Secularism in France think religion overall is an attack and stain on secularism.

Secularism has been closely followed after the separation of church and state after the French Revolution and the 1905 Law that established it as a principle of the French Republic. The relationship between the French political institutions and the Catholic Church the religion the French have historically followed haven't been that great since the late 18th Century and even till now.

Overall France is not a religious country, chooses not to be one and therefore has chosen to take a more decisive stance on religion and religious people in general. Overall it sucks to be a religious person in France.

Nice point bro! Now let's pray that Iran one day becomes a secular democracy like France. 

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Bismehe Ta3ala,

I will pray on this laylatul joum3 for Allah swt protect and prolong Sayyid Ali Khamanei's life and for the great Islamic Republic to stay on the nahaj of Imam Khomeini until the appearance of Baqayatul Allah.

M3 Salamah, FE AMIN Allah

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5 minutes ago, Zendegi said:

Besides the Burkini is not just banned in France but also in Iran. Obviously for different reasons.

What do women wear to beaches in Iran? Normal daily clothes? Or are women just not allowed to go to public beaches in Iran? Just curious. 

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1 hour ago, notme said:

What do women wear to beaches in Iran? Normal daily clothes? Or are women just not allowed to go to public beaches in Iran? Just curious. 

First of all, Burkinis are simply banned in Iran because according to the authorities they are too revealing and show too much of the body when women swim with it.

Not they are not banned from the beach. Women have to remain clothed and usually are required to watch from the shore as men swim and children play. But some women don't follow these rules and go swim far into the water.

Also a lot of the times there are areas on the beach designated for women. Other option women have is to seek out an unpopulated area and wade in just a feet or two in a menteau and headscarf.

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On 8/23/2016 at 6:12 PM, Laayla said:

Bismehe Ta3ala,

Assalam Alikum.

If you are an observant Muslimah, you don't go to mixed beaches.  Just avoid going to the beach all together so you wouldn't have to remove your clothing.  It's not the end of the world if you don't go to the beach.

A shortage of common sense detected.

M3 Salamah, FE AMIN Allah

Salam Laayla,

Wow. That's sad and oppressive. :(

There are beaches where women do not have to remove their clothing, including the beach my hubby and I go to near where we live.

I've seen Muslim women there enjoying the water and the sand and the sun, and their children playing happily. :)Muslim women and children enjoying God's creation is awesome!!! Some wear the burkini, and it's cool! :)

I would like to buy one someday, though I'd need to attach a Christian symbol to show I'm Christian, not Muslim.

I love these burkinis!!!

burkini.jpg

Burkini.jpg

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burkini-fashion2.jpg

 

France is wrong for banning burkinis. I understand why a nation not dominated by Muslims would ban the burka or covering of the face, but burkinis don't even cover the face.

Anyways, it is wrong of France to oppress Muslim women by not allowing them to dress their definition of modest at the beach. :( I hope the USA never makes such a law. If so, then I would peacefully protest that.

Peace and God bless you

 

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On 8/23/2016 at 6:36 PM, hameedeh said:

Last night I had dinner at a halal restaurant with relatives of mine, and they invited a couple of friends who are Catholic. They were talking about this burkini swimming suit news. The lady said she thought this was discrimination to harass a Muslim woman. 

Salam Hameedeh,

Yep, I think it's discrimination and harassing a Muslim woman too. :(

I go the beach oftentimes in dresses because I sunburn easily. I would throw a hissy fit lol if anybody told me to get out of my dress. Why? Because I have the right to cover up my body same as Muslim women and same as nuns do, if I so desire. 

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She said her aunt, who is a nun and lives in France, could walk along that same beach in her nun clothing and nobody would stop her.

Aye. I'm sure nobody would stop women wearing dresses either. Sadly, this is a case of discrimination, and it's wrong. Burkinis don't hurt anybody. They are just a more modest form of swimwear. They are in a way similar to women's bathing suits a long time ago: 

maryal-knox-SL7.jpg

Adorable bathing suit, hmm? :) (I think so; I'm not being sarcastic!)

Peace and God bless you

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