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You MUST read at least ONE Mutahari book

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:bismillah:

 

:salam:

Martyr Mutahari r.a, a major leader / player of the iranian revolution, mourned by Imam Khomeini r.a during his murder, is arguably one of the most influential and intelligent thinkers of his time. I am not exaggerating when i say, i have never yet come across an author who writes with such clarity, who discusses issues far, and way ahead of his time, in ways that are so honest, so logical, taking into account the arguments for and against propositions he makes. You feel such a deep sense of contentment when you read his books, and he is not afraid to tackle even the most controversial of issues.

For example, his works on the theory of evolution are so masterful, the way he approaches it. It is not your typical 'lets deny evolution'. Rather, he engages it with a principled mind whereby he does not compromise islamic beliefs, but approaches the topic through established fundamentals and works up from there.

Many of his other books ranging from an array of topics, are so wonderfully written, so ahead of their time, many of shiachat's own great thinkers, those deeply interested in philosophy, who i won't name and will keep to myself, have recommended me certain Mutahari books themselves. 

I tell you, if every shia brother and sister, or even every muslim read his books, Islam, and muslims would be light years ahead of what we are. It's such a shame, and what a loss, that such treasures are kept away and not even looked upon by many shia muslims!

I'm not Iranian. I consider myself someone who is hard to convince about anything, who requires evidence, who wants honesty, and who cares about the truth, irrespective of what authority says otherwise or the popularity or numbers or other logical fallacies, unless i'm convinced and evidence has been shown to me. No-one said to me, here , read Mutahari. I stumbled on his works accidentally, and i tell you, i was absolutely enchanted. 

Click here to Access some of his books on Al-Islam: https://www.al-islam.org/person/ayatullah-murtadha-mutahhari

 

Endorsements by Ayatullah Khamanei(ha) and Ayatullah Khomeini(r.a):

 

 

 

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57 minutes ago, Tawheed313 said:

For example, his works on the theory of evolution are so masterful, the way he approaches it. It is not your typical 'lets deny evolution'. Rather, he engages it with a principled mind whereby he does not compromise islamic beliefs, but approaches the topic through established fundamentals and works up from there.

So what does he say about evolution? 

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This is one of my favorite books by Ayatullah Mutahhari:

Anecdotes of The Ahlul Bayt

https://www.al-islam.org/anecdotes-ahlul-bayt-ayatullah-murtadha-mutahhari

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8 minutes ago, hameedeh said:

Thank you for the links. I've checked them out and they don't discuss my topic of interest, Darwinian evolution. 

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33 minutes ago, Ali666 said:

Thank you for the links. I've checked them out and they don't discuss my topic of interest, Darwinian evolution. 

:salam:

Here you go brother:

https://www.al-islam.org/al-tawhid/vol12-vol13/causes-responsible-materialist-tendencies-west-2-4-ayatullah-murtadha/causes#god-and-evolution

and this might be somewhat linked: https://www.al-islam.org/al-tawhid/vol12-vol13/causes-responsible-materialist-tendencies-west-3-4-ayatullah-murtadha/causes#argument-design

 

 

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On 6/23/2016 at 0:02 AM, Tawheed313 said:

 

Wa Aleikum Salaam,

I saw your post last week and thought I should give it a try. So i purchased 'Light within me'. I have only read 1/5th of it but so far it has truly been illuminating.

Thank you very much for the great advice. Once I finish this book, I will check out his other books.

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This book changed my life (woman and her rights):

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/6rz5f3vgj1rywy0/JA6NDUMQkB/Woman%20And%20Her%20Rights%20In%20Islam%20-%20Shaheed%20Mutahhari.pdf

I wrote an essay on the topic of the importance of shaheed mutahhari for the modern Muslim for the magazine released by WIIRE during the last Shaheed Mutahhari conference in Toronto...I'll see if i can find it..Here:
 

The Proper Place of Shaheed Mutahhari Amongst the Youth 

 

 

I still remember the ecstasy I felt the first time I picked up a book by Shaheed Mutahhari. I was a typical, confused Muslim teenager who was cruising along the public school system with no real interest in anything; other than video games of course. It was only later that I was to realize that those years spent coasting and getting by had actually left me with a worldview that was primarily defined by mainstream culture. Islam was really just a part of my life that fit neatly into the box drawn by that worldview. Yet, as I started to intellectually mature, I began to realize that pieces of Islam were sticking out of that box and I couldn’t get them to fit back in. Something had to change. 

 

It was at that time of great confusion, when I realized that I would have to examine some of my previously held beliefs, that I began to question the deen. For a while I turned to YouTube lectures and other resources which helped me gain some satisfaction on a narrow range of issues. But I can’t forget the first time someone suggested that I read Woman and Her Rights after I had begun to explore the issue of hijab, gender relations and human rights in Islam.  

 

Up until then I hadn’t been much of a reader, but for some reason or another, perhaps by Divine Grace, I happened to find the drive to start reading this particular book. What struck me immediately were the depth and the breadth of thought of Shaheed Mutahhari. The way he approaches issues and his capacity to see the underlying reasons behind things allows him to order his discussion of any topic in a supremely logical sequence. The consequence of this was that I couldn’t help but have my worldview expanded by what I felt like were miles, so to speak. For example, in Woman and Her Rights, after explaining the history of the women’s rights movement as conceived by the West, Ayatollah Mutahhari starts to solve the problems put forward by first writing a chapter called “Modern Life and Islam.” His broad vision allowed him to see that the underlying cause of the clash between feminism and Islam was actually the concept of modernity and an evolving ethical code to adapt for this loose concept we call “the times.”  

 

In that chapter he explains how the law-making mechanism of the Sharia is such that it addresses human nature, which never changes, in all situations that man may find himself. The Sharia, therefore, has underlying principles which are rigid, but a flexible mechanism for the applying those principles. These principles exist in a hierarchy, such that some laws are given a governing position over other laws in order to protect higher values over lower values. It is for this reason that we pray our salah sitting when we are on an airplane and are unable to otherwise perform the salah. We don’t sacrifice the salah; rather we sacrifice facing the Qibla or standing, or other features in our normal salah.  

 

It is only once this point is established that Mutahhari goes on to address the question as to whether the differences between men and women have a natural basis or if they are completely contrived by societal norms. For if it can be established that these differences have a basis in nature, then the Sharia would necessarily need to have at least a part of its laws pertaining to gender to be stable through time in order to guide mankind in accordance with our immutable nature. 

 

This concept may seem obvious to some readers, but for a teenager who had never heard this properly explained from the mimbar, my conception was that of a rigid Islam whose laws had not yet come into contact with my reality. His explanation did not simply address the issue of women’s rights, but rather he was able to expand my entire conception of Islam’s place in the modern world; a topic very much related to my every day practise of the deen. In one fell swoop he was able to give me a comprehensive understanding of the subject at hand, leaving no stone unturned, and to expand my worldview to subjects beyond. It was through my understanding of his resolution of the issue of women’s rights that so many other issues became clear in my mind, alhamdulillah. 

 

Upon reflection one of the greatest effects the late Shaheed has had on my life is the confidence he has given me in the deen and in our ulema. By witnessing, or rather experiencing firsthand his foresight, the strength of his arguments, and the rigour of his logic, he was able to disperse any doubts I had regarding the Islamic position and he introduced me to a truly Islamic worldview. In addition to this, he created an insatiable thirst for knowledge within me; one which has propelled me to my current course in life, namely the study of philosophy. As I continue to study philosophy as a major in university, Ayatollah Mutahhari continually serves as a reference point for orthodoxy and what I can take to be a trusted position amongst the ulema. But more than that, my dear Shaheed continues to be the ladder through which I propel myself to higher levels of understanding, bi ithnillah.  

 

I cannot emphasize enough the importance of sharing his ideas with our youth who naturally take their first conception on any issues they know nothing about from the first source of information they come into contact with. Consequently, by virtue of living in this society, that first contact is almost always going to be with the ideas floating around in mainstream culture. While parents may have an effect on basic issues that a child faces at a young age, higher intellectual issues which constitute the basis of a youth’s worldview are always going to be taken from the general culture by default. This holds true even if we attempt to create a bubble separating our youth from mainstream society through institutions like Islamic schools, since despite all efforts that bubble will at best be semipermeable and at worse no better than a fishnet. In other words, no matter what we do, a youth living in the urban West will always be exposed to a very large dose of Western values and beliefs. Hence, it is only through education that one is able to create a basis of comparison in the mind of that youth for them to then decide between alternatives and to alter their viewpoint. Insha-Allah this is where the true strength of an Islamic school comes into play, since it can partially facilitate that education, in addition to creating a semipermeable barrier whereby a  youth is not overwhelmed by mainstream culture and having to swim against the current, so to speak. 

 

My purpose in writing this article in reality is to convey this point. It is through my personal experience that I am hoping to convey to the reader the transformative power of Shaheed Mutahhari and the importance of establishing an Islamic conceptual framework. I am confident in saying that it is not possible for the average person to establish a truly Islamic worldview in the modern world without recourse to the thought of the late Shaheed, at least in part. The responsibility to acquire such a worldview, which is a prerequisite to passing it on to the next generation, is ultimately an individual responsibility and cannot be exhaustively delegated to an Islamic school or masjid. So make some coffee, find a comfortable couch, and take some time to meet the great mind of Ayatollah Mutahhari. 

 

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The Martyr Mutahari r.a is a great scholar among the Shia scholars that Ayatollah Khomeini recommended every youth to read it.

one distinguished point of his book is that his books don't belong to his age and it is useful for nowadays which we face with new questions and misgiving.

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