Jump to content
Guests can now reply in ALL forum topics (No registration required!) ×
Guests can now reply in ALL forum topics (No registration required!)
In the Name of God بسم الله
Sign in to follow this  
Abu Hadi

Reverts Path To Integration

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

True enough. I actually avoid most Muslim communities because I had some bad experiences ten years ago. I've known a few others who un-converted, usually after a divorce, because they had no social support in the Muslim community. 

I'm antisocial so it doesn't mean much to me. It's huge for extroverts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just wondering here...why does the nature of the " native" Muslim community have to be on either end of the spectrum? Ethnic immigrant communities, unless they are very large or make a huge effort to stay together in a colony of sorts, usually dissipate within two generations in the US.

Exogamy ( ethnically and religiously) is a big factor for any group and , as I 'be said before, currently American Islamic males of various  ethnicities are being labeled " the new Jews" ( another group with a penchant for out-marriage).

My Sunni friend openly says  " don't drag anything negative over here...just leave it back where you came from...we came here to get away from that" . She is going to be marrying outside of her own ethnicity soon. I personally think she is probably what the "new American Muslims" will be like. But I live on the Left Coast, not the MidWest. Could be just the way we are out here on the edge of the continent.

Edited by LeftCoastMom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Native muslim community means people who consider themselves to be native. For example, I consider myself to be American, that's my Nationality and my , I guess, ethnicity. Most of the muslims in United States (currently) were born in another country and came here either as children or adults. If you ask them, they will say ' I am Lebanese/ Iraqi / Iranian / Pakistani' and I live in America but I am not American. They are from that community and they consider that country to be their nationality and / or ethnicity. 

So the muslims who live in this country and they identify their nationality / ethnicity as from that country are considered native. 

Within that native community are a few children of first, mostly second, third, 9th(in my case), and Nth in the case of Native Americans, native with a capital 'N' generation immigrants and also reverts to Islam, i.e. those who were born into families whose religion was something else, other than Islam. So there is a native community who were born into muslim families and native community who were born into non muslim families. My points are mostly about the second group. 

 

Edited by Abu Hadi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Abu Hadi said:

I never questioned the fact that someday in the not too distant future, there will be a large community of muslims in all of these countries whose ancestors had not arrived recently

Let me give you an example that may help.

When Muslims first arrived to the U.K., many activities were communal including Shia/Sunni.

As numbers grew so people devolved to their own groups.

So, for example, while everyone may have gone to a Khoja Gujerati imambara, once there was critical mass and an Urdu speaking imambara could be set up - Urdu speakers devolved there.

It's not so much a question of ideology or worship differences or race, rather a question of who your mates are, what language you speak most easily, what food you prefer and so on.

It's entirely natural, therefore, for reverts to have their own organisations. There's nothing intrinsically wrong with it. Indeed, you may well find that 2nd and 3rd generation immigrant Muslims find such organisations attractive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Br. Abu Hadi--Jazakallah Khayr for all your efforts. I have heard of the crucial importance of this matter--how at the time a person takes Shahadat, everyone surrounds that person, and makes them feel special...but then don't follow through, and the newly reverted brother/sister is left in a state of emotional emptiness--not only do they feel out-casted by their family, but also don't have strong community support.

I think it's important for reverts to take advantage of all resources out there. They shouldn't limit themselves or base all of their experiences on just one center or just one Masjid--but to really broaden their horizons, and exhaust all resources out there--and should also take advantage of the Masajid/resources of our Sunni brothers and sisters as well--especially for those living in the west. For example, the Friday prayers and the diversity that those prayers draw (for example) is pretty cool. Obviously what you're doing for followers of Ahle Bayt is amazing, and I hope that integration in our communities will always be comfortable and welcoming Inshallah. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Br. Abu Hadi--Jazakallah Khayr for all your efforts. I have heard of the crucial importance of this matter--how at the time a person takes Shahadat, everyone surrounds that person, and makes them feel special...but then don't follow through, and the newly reverted brother/sister is left in a state of emotional emptiness--not only do they feel out-casted by their family, but also don't have strong community support.

I think it's important for reverts to take advantage of all resources out there. They shouldn't limit themselves or base all of their experiences on just one center or just one Masjid--but to really broaden their horizons, and exhaust all resources out there--and should also take advantage of the Masajid/resources of our Sunni brothers and sisters as well--especially for those living in the west. For example, the Friday prayers and the diversity that those prayers draw (for example) is pretty cool. Obviously what you're doing for followers of Ahle Bayt is amazing, and I hope that integration in our communities will always be comfortable and welcoming Inshallah. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, notme said:

"North American Muslim cultural centers"

And no doubt they'll develop a unique culture of their own, e.g. events starting and finishing on time, people sticking to the rules, parking considerately and so on. :cuddle: 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Haji 2003 said:

And no doubt they'll develop a unique culture of their own, e.g. events starting and finishing on time, people sticking to the rules, parking considerately and so on. :cuddle: 

Maybe, and less gossip too, but the food won't be as good as at the other Muslim cultural centers. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just registered.

Speaking from experience, integration can be difficult; excruciatingly so as a new Shia coming from a different place, a different background (ethnic and otherwise), and a different school of thought.

Many people approach you with warmth and friendship, but there always seems that there's an invisible wall somewhere... like "Welcome to the family, but not literally", if that makes any sense.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Salam, 

We are getting many registrations on Migration313.org. 

That's the good news. The bad news is that we are also getting spam bots registering. 

I am catching them, but just to make sure these are not real users that want to register, I am asking brothers and sisters that when they 

register as a new user

1) Choose an Islam name or your real name (most names are still avaliable)

2) For your profile picture, either put your real picture, or if you don't want to, put a picture with some sort of Islamic theme. 

That way, I will be able to differentiate between the real registrations and the bots. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it will be a community which only unity will be Islam and not the "race", maybe it will be lead by the branch of islam that convert in those countries the most, (But I don't think wahabi, since it's perceived as something very radical and those countries live in the opposite way to what Islam teaches; It's what I guess but I don't know the future).

I want to say that there's no shia mosques in my city, just sunnies, recently I discovered one, but there's no website, nor phone numbers, just a facebook page (I sent a message and I never got an answer), I went to the mosque twice and It was closed, how can a mosque be closed on fridays?

I sent an email to the irani embassy to ask if the know something about that mosque and I never got an answer either.

Google say that there is a mosque in which I can go no matter if is sunni or shia, I haven't gone yet, I'm not sure if going to a sunni mosque since sunni and shias don't get along so much...

Edited by Nataly
mistakes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...