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In the Name of God بسم الله
beardedbaker

The Beard & Bread Appreciation Society

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And what exactly is wrong with angry rough bearded guys?

 

I personally love the quintessential Afghan look, I want to look like this man if I ever grow to his age:

 

 

There is nothing wrong with it but not every man in Afghanistan looks that way, as Marbles rightly pointed out. In fact, the majority of men don't.  

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And what exactly is wrong with angry rough bearded guys?

 

 

I was referring to the violent, dirty-looking, gun-totting type who, thanks to media, have become a hallmark of the Afghan look in the subconsciousness of outsiders. 

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I was referring to the violent, dirty-looking, gun-totting type who, thanks to media, have become a hallmark of the Afghan look in the subconsciousness of outsiders. 

 

But that's the problem of the western media, and the outsiders subconsciousness and lack of interst to understand the 'Other', not the angry Afghani bro fighting western imperialism. And his lack of hygiene is probably down to the corrupt puppet government's fault for not providing basic services.

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But that's the problem of the western media, and the outsiders subconsciousness and lack of interest to understand the 'Other', not the angry Afghani bro fighting western imperialism. And his lack of hygiene is probably down to the corrupt puppet government's fault for not providing basic services.

 

He didn't say that anyone in particular was at fault for that perception or that there was anything wrong with being an angry, gun-totting, rough-looking bearded guy. 

 

I think his point was simply that the above happens to be the image that most people in the West have of Afghan men and as such, they are surprised when they meet his friend, who doesn't look like that at all. 

Edited by alina92

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He didn't say that anyone in particular was at fault for that perception or that there was anything wrong with being an angry, gun-totting, rough-looking bearded guy. 

 

I think his point was simply that the above happens to be the image that most people in the West have of Afghan men and as such, they are surprised when they meet his friend, who doesn't look like that at all. 

 

Im not arguing against his point, just saying that they are surprised because they are lazy ignorants, who can't be bother to learn about other people beyond what they read or hear from their biased media.

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I prefer this: Mashhadi barbari bread:

 

81426983-6142443.jpg

People call that Afghani bread. I guess it depends on the person who bakes it. :)

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Paki bread is great and all but I prefer this:

 

Mashhadi barbari bread:

 

81426983-6142443.jpg

 

As Hameedeh said this looks like Afghani bread you find here in restaurants, personally it doesn't compare, Subcontinental bread goes best with kababs and curries.  I always wish the Afghani restaurants here served their kababs with Pakistani bread and yogurt chutni instead of garlic sauce but most still don't.  The Pakistani Afghani variant of hybrid cuisine in West Pakistan/Peshawar gets the balance just right where a lot of delicious Afghani/Pushtun food (traditionally cooked with less spices) is served with Pakistani style tandoor naans.

 

Paki bread gets boring after you've had it a few times. 

 

Disagree, don't know who bakes your bread but it never gets old. It is true that it bloats you and the whole wheat alternative is healthier.

Edited by King

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And of course the best kind of bread:

 

 

Garlic-Naan.gif

 

 

 

 

What is the minced sabzi? Is it parsley or mint? Looks refreshing. :)

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What is the minced sabzi? Is it parsley or mint? Looks refreshing. :)

 

Those are chopped garlic scapes or garlic stalks as we call them. They taste just like garlic. Garnish a regular naan with it and it becomes garlic naan.

 

The greens.

 

garlic1.jpg

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On 9/3/2015 at 8:25 PM, King said:

As Hameedeh said this looks like Afghani bread you find here in restaurants, personally it doesn't compare,

If you aint ate it then you can't comment.

It's different from Afghani bread, although I like Afghani bread as well (especially the sweet ones; I have an Afghani friend who's a baker and he made me one a few times).

Also: if you buy such a bread cold, you need to pop it in an oven or a toaster. Do NOT just eat it like that. There's a big difference. It needs to be a little crispy on the outside but if it stays too long in the oven or toaster it will become hard and dry.

Either way, it's a good-tasting, hearty bread that goes well with everything.

Dear Marbles:

But why do we need to even bring that up?

"But hey, look: some Afghanis look somewhat similar to I-talians or Spaniards!!!"

What if every Afghan looked like this? Is that morally wrong or something?

It's like snow. Most Westerners would probably shocked to see pictures of snow in Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iran and the like. Does that make snow something of moral value?

People's perceptions need to be changed but the underlying prejudices need to be changed as well.

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Dear Marbles:

8

But why do we need to even bring that up?

 

"But hey, look: some Afghanis look somewhat similar to I-talians or Spaniards!!!"

 

What if every Afghan looked like this? Is that morally wrong or something?

 

 

 

It's like snow. Most Westerners would probably shocked to see pictures of snow in Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iran and the like. Does that make snow something of moral value?

 

People's perceptions need to be changed but the underlying prejudices need to be changed as well.

 

No, I completely agree about that. I was only reporting what my Afghan friend related to me. I was also like, 'So what if they took you for a Spanish or an Italian. It doesn't make you any better and not looking like them doesn't make you any worse.' But I did not say that and took it to be his observation of Western perceptions of Afghans, which we know aren't very flattering.

 

Some of us aspire to look like Westerners and get happy when we're positively compared. "Wow, walking some of Tehran's streets it looks like you're in downtown [insert a Western city]." "Wow, Pakistani mountains are like French Alps *blink blink* *smiling ear to ear* (in fact, Pakistani mountain ranges are far majestic and nothing like European midget hillocks).

 

This is part of the inferiority complex of our societies. Insofar as you're criticising this mindset, I am with you.

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^ Two expressions I can't stand:

 

"naan bread"

 

Naan is a general word used among Farsi speakers for all types of bread. Not so among us desis. We use 'naan' for the leavened bread only. The unleavened type is called roti or chapati. Both naans and rotis are breads. But the expression 'naan bread,' I agree, sounds out of tune.

 

Btw, the Western breads are called 'double roti' - double as English word which we've appropriated to Urdu.

 

This is enough agreeing with you in a day. Now say something outrageous.

Edited by Marbles

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I am with King....naan bread + Afghani Kabab...When I was in Kabul thats all I ate...Costed me 2 dollars...

 

In Russia too they have amazing Kababs...bit better than the Afghani ones...they are made by people of Caucuses/Kavkaz...but they lack the bread aspect.

 

Otkuda-pojavilsja-shashlyk.jpg

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The apple & walnut tea loaf calls for '102 grams leaven' and i only have dry yeast. How would one modify the recipe for dry yeast? im concerned about having too much fluid in it.

 

 

the leaven is in there almost entirely for flavour purposes, so don't worry about using it or replacing it with a tiny bit of dry yeast. It might sound like a lot of liquid, but I've tried the recipe myself and it works fine. Only thing I changed is the amount of walnuts, which was way too much for my liking so I halved the quantity. They can be quite pricey as well.. to make any profit on this cake I would have to sell the whole piece for 10£...

Disagree, don't know who bakes your bread but it never gets old. It is true that it bloats you and the whole wheat alternative is healthier.

 

DIsagree all you want, I make my own bread, and it's as varied as old french pain au levain, to pizza romana bianca, to sourdough brioche burger buns, to lebanese mana'eesh, to rotis to iranian barbari....and I tell you, pakistani bread is my least favourite. great for dipping in curries, but that's about it.

Most epic Arab beard:

 

357m42o.jpg

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the leaven is in there almost entirely for flavour purposes, so don't worry about using it or replacing it with a tiny bit of dry yeast. It might sound like a lot of liquid, but I've tried the recipe myself and it works fine. Only thing I changed is the amount of walnuts, which was way too much for my liking so I halved the quantity. They can be quite pricey as well.. to make any profit on this cake I would have to sell the whole piece for 10£...

 

Yes walnuts are a bit pricey here too. Ok thank you for the guidance. InshAllah i plan to make it next week, my mums requested cheese bread this weekend so ive had to put it on hold.

Edited by Ruq

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world-beard-day-no-text2.jpg?w=250&h=350

 

World Beard Day Facts

 

– In southern Spain, many townships gather to witness a boxing match between a bearded man and a beardless boy. The bearded man, normally armed with a sharp pike, is typically the victor.

– In the Swedish village of Dönskborg, anyone without a beard is banished from the town and forced to spend twenty-four hours in a nearby forest. Back in the town, the hirsute burn effigies of their clean-chinned loved ones.

– The exact origins of World Beard Day are unknown, but there is some evidence to suggest that Danish Vikings had a special day dedicated to the glorification of beards as far back as 800 AD. The event was not held on a fixed date, and was often celebrated hundreds of times each year. This early incarnation of what would one day become World Beard Day typically involved the ransacking of neighbouring towns, villages and countries by large groups of heavily-armed bearded men.

– Throughout the world, bearded communities are encouraged to acknowledge this sacred day by organising and staging their own public or private World Beard Day celebrations. These can consist of anything from a relaxing family lunch to a lavish, tax payer-funded street parade.

– Shaving on World Beard Day is universally considered to be highly disrespectful.

 

WHAT TO DO ON WORLD BEARD DAY

 

If you are hosting a World Beard Day event, here’s a helpful list of things you can do to make this the greatest World Beard Day ever…

 

Break bread with your bearded brethren!

 

What World Beard Day would be complete without a mouthwatering array of beard friendly foods? Popular options include…

 

– Barbecues / meat on a spit
– Hot dogs (halal)
– Vindaloo
– Vodka (non-alcoholic)
– Fondue

 

Have a fire

If local laws permit, build a fire (or if you prefer have some beardless people build you a fire),
then sit around the fire and enjoy having a beard and living in a golden age of beardedness.

 

Change a Tyre

Grab a bearded mate or two, flatten a car’s tyre, then enjoy the satisfaction of changing it using your extensive life skills.

 

World Beard Day Games and Events

World Beard Day events often feature various games and events. Feel free to create your own event, or choose from any of the following customary World Beard Day games…

 

– All-bearded human pyramid (current record 22)
– Cleanchin darts (Just stick a picture of your least favourite beardless individual onto the dart board and throw darts at his face).
– Vodka
– World Beard Day Pinata (fill a paper mache beardless guy with treats, hang him from a tree, give the guy with the biggest beard a club and tell him to get clubbin’!)
– Effigy Burning. Make a simple effigy of a beardless guy and celebrate beards by burning him to the ground.
– Pin-the-beard-on-the-guy (by far the easiest, least-challenging World Beard Day game – no blindfold required.)
– Dungeons and Dragons

 

Have a Sing

Break out the vodka (non-alcoholic), band together and sing along to your favourite beard-related songs.

 

WBD League Sports

Play your favourite sports the way sports were meant to be played: Bearded vs. Non-Bearded, with the beardless team heavily handicapped (feel free to create your own handicaps for the beardless team or “losing team”). Popular choices include…

 

– The losing team has fewer players.
– The losing team is made up entirely of children.
– The referees / umpires are all members of the bearded team (winning team).
– The losing team or selected members of the losing team are blind folded, bound and gagged.

Edited by thecontentedself

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http://food52.com/recipes/25386-apple-walnut-tea-cake

 

^ That is yummy. The only issue i had was with the texture. For some reason mine was very crumbly, a slice wouldnt stay intact when transfered to plate. The only things i did differently fromt he recipe were:

 

- i used half white, half wholemeal flour instead of the spelt

- I used low fat creme fraiche

- i used dry yeast (which added an extra tsp or so of liquid to the recipe)

- i added some grated root ginger

 

I'm guessing it must be the change in flour? should i increase the amount of flour next time?

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This looks very interesting Wahdat, is it in Russia?

 

yeah...people from azerbijan and surrounding areas make the best kababs i have ever tasted...

and now in the category of the longest beard ever sported....

post-84695-0-17282300-1442232668_thumb.j

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http://food52.com/recipes/25386-apple-walnut-tea-cake

^ That is yummy. The only issue i had was with the texture. For some reason mine was very crumbly, a slice wouldnt stay intact when transfered to plate. The only things i did differently fromt he recipe were:

- i used half white, half wholemeal flour instead of the spelt

- I used low fat creme fraiche

- i used dry yeast (which added an extra tsp or so of liquid to the recipe)

- i added some grated root ginger

I'm guessing it must be the change in flour? should i increase the amount of flour next time?

The flour and low fat creme fraiche won't affect the texture. And neither should the yeast be an issue,although I wouldn't use dry yeast in cakes, and instead replace it with baking powder to get the light fluffy texture.

I'll check a non-leaven version of this cake which I think is in the first Tartine book. You should buy it, it's got great recipes for sweet things.

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The flour and low fat creme fraiche won't affect the texture. And neither should the yeast be an issue,although I wouldn't use dry yeast in cakes, and instead replace it with baking powder to get the light fluffy texture.

I'll check a non-leaven version of this cake which I think is in the first Tartine book. You should buy it, it's got great recipes for sweet things.

 

Thanks that'd be great. What about if i added another egg? would that bind it more and make it less crumbly?

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I don't usually bake, and I'm beardless... I just have to comment: this is by far the strangest forum discussion I've ever seen.

My vote for best bread is my mom's. My vote for best beard is my husband's. :D

I bake only quick breads like muffins, corn bread, (American) biscuits, and an occasional pizza crust, but some of these photos make me want to try baking.

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... and I'm beardless...Hopefully

 

I just have to comment: this is by far the strangest forum discussion I've ever seen. What is so "strange"? The eclecticity?

My vote for best bread is my mom's.  My ex-'s. Even men would tell me they were "jealous" and their wives are good bakers.

 

Edited by hasanhh

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