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In the Name of God بسم الله

Iranian Women And Hiijab

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The hijab is for men, not women.  I don't think women understand how difficult it is for man to see or be around women who are not covered up.  Hijab is a mercy for men, and a protection for women.  Us women have to be kinder to our men folk, that's why we should be as covered as possible so that men can get on with their daily lives.  I love my hijab now more than ever, and I hope my daughter will too.

Dear sister, I don't mean to alarm you but I need to point this out. Muslim women feel that hijab,burka etc protect them from sexual exploitation. This is a fallacy. To sexual predators its your gender that attracts them. Not only pretty young women are attacked. Elderly ladies, nuns, tiny children etc, all have been attacked regardless of dress

In Iran, are non Muslims ordered to wear hijab?

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No one said it makes you a bad person. Many laws are there for other reasons than preventing you personally from bad/good. 

But you do have a choice!  ^_^ You make the personal decision whether you want to live in the Islamic Republic of Iran or not.   I don't understand what is so hard about this. Respect the laws, cultur

damn. I hate these people who live in other countries and wanna change Iran laws

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Surely there are more worthy causes that feminists should protest about- such as women not even being allowed to drive in Saudi Arabia.

Talking about having freedom- for example, full time education is compulsory in the UK till you are 16. Where is my freedom of choice in that? Similarly, a modest dress code in place for BOTH men and women in Iran. Laws stipulated by an Islamic system which the people voted in favour of.

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Just a few points, out of many.
 

 No offence Kamyar but this is such a bizarre and bad analogy. You are comparing something that can easily be detrimental to ones health and survival to the choice of Iranian women having the freedom to wear hijab or not.

 

Plus how should this overall issue effect you anyway, well I see that drug dealers are posing more of a threat to society everywhere than the average Iranian woman who doesn't want to wear the hijab in their country. You are comparing these two unrelated issues with such a bad analogy that I can't go into detail any further. I don't even know why you had to bring it up in the first place.

 

Besides the fact that discussion sometimes is pointless and it is a waste of time for both sides, but let's assume you are right and not observing hijab doesn't harm society. Let's assume this kind of campaigns are really running by Iranian women and let's assume they are concerned over their denied right of bihejabi!  

 

Can't the logic below about hijab be applied to drug consumers and providers? 

 

I am not an Iranian women, so it is not right for me to give an opinion on what they choose to wear in Iran. But all I can say is that they should frankly make their own decisions and they should not be unwillingly forced by a higher authority to do and wear what they wantIt is their choice and no one else's to make. I hope that's clear.

 

As a believer in justice and free speech, I believe this campaign on Facebook is one of the great initiatives set up by Iranian women to get their proposed rights and freedoms heard on a larger world scale, instead of protesting on the streets where they will unfortunately get attacked and imprisoned by the authorities. Social media is the haven for Iranians to peacefully voice their ideas and opinions, where they are not able to do this openly in Iran.

 

You are guys on this forum are very much free to voice your opinions against this campaign and I am not against if you do that. But I personally don't feel it is right for you guys to do that, because you will be making fools out of yourselves. I suggest you leave Iranian women to their own devices and let them worry about their futureWhy should this campaign in anyway effect people like you? Don't you guys have better things to do in life?

 

According to this logic, who are you to prevent them? It is their choice. Yes it harms them but does it hurt you as well? No. Let them be free as long as they are just harming themselves.

 

damn. I hate these people who live in other countries and wanna change Iran laws

 

Do you yourself know ba khodet chand chandi?! I don't want to answer me, just answer to yourself!

 

Mate the authorities there have made the whole society soo male centred, this what you had has expect from the men in the last 30 or so years. 

 

 

I think the situation in the west is more enjoyable for men.

 

Unlike Islam's view about women, in the west they are just goods, or worse than it, tools for selling goods. At least in the Islam, they are not considered as doll.

 

Iran is an Islamic nation and hijab is a respected value by both government and people and almost nobody has problem with the hijab law. I don't know why some non-Iranians or Iranians living abroad can't understand this fact and are evaluating Iran's situation by Western values! 

 

Anyways, I am still waiting someone creates a topic and voices concern over women's situation in the West:

 

Shocking level of sexual harassment on Paris trains: Poll

 

That's just one example.

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Just a few points, out of many.
 

 

Besides the fact that discussion sometimes is pointless and it is a waste of time for both sides, but let's assume you are right and not observing hijab doesn't harm society. Let's assume this kind of campaigns are really running by Iranian women and let's assume they are concerned over their denied right of bihejabi!  

 

Can't the logic below about hijab be applied to drug consumers and providers? 

 

 

According to this logic, who are you to prevent them? It is their choice. Yes it harms them but does it hurt you as well? No. Let them be free as long as they are just harming themselves.

 

 

Do you yourself know ba khodet chand chandi?! I don't want to answer me, just answer to yourself!

 

 

I think the situation in the west is more enjoyable for men.

 

Unlike Islam's view about women, in the west they are just goods, or worse than it, tools for selling goods. At least in the Islam, they are not considered as doll.

 

Iran is an Islamic nation and hijab is a respected value by both government and people and almost nobody has problem with the hijab law. I don't know why some non-Iranians or Iranians living abroad can't understand this fact and are evaluating Iran's situation by Western values! 

 

Anyways, I am still waiting someone creates a topic and voices concern over women's situation in the West:

 

Shocking level of sexual harassment on Paris trains: Poll

 

That's just one example.

 

Still your analogy with drug dealers and addicts is quite bizarre and there is not point defending it. I swear you are not making any sense out of it either. This is ridiculous, anyway drug dealers and their victims the drug addicts not just effect themselves, they are also mentally and socially effecting their families and friends overall, you know this issue had cause separations and divorces in Iran and a bunch of other sad issues  I will still stick to my last post on this as there is no point repeating myself. I  know your against this campaign set out by some Iranian women but there are many other suitable way to criticise them and their "logic" instead of trying to be some smart aleck and trying to compare these two unrelated issues.

 

Oh look its another vice versa situation, what people say in the west about how women are treated in Muslim countries as worthless objects, is the same thing your saying about them lol. As I mentioned in another post, what you see as decency in one place is not necessarily the same in the other. What you think of the status of women doesn't matter really because many western women could shout out at your claims that western society is more enjoyable for men. Its a bold and uncanny remark to make. No doubt there are issues in both societies, which I am not at all denying.

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. . .Ultimately, you have to recognize that whatever extent YOU feel decency and modesty should be enforced (and remember: you DO feel that this should be enforced; most of the world does) is arbitrary. So you are judging a nation's laws by your own arbitrary measure.

 

Dead-on, I think.

 

People have to stop pretending their personal preferences are human rights.

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well, you you want to stay on the facebook campaign ... sure :D have you even been to the page?? I can't posts those photos here cos some of them are of half nude women...wearing sleeveless, backless, showing plenty of decolletage., bikinis ..... Is that what she is campaigning for??

I get you felt so offended by my post that you had to get a mod to edit just a small portion of it because I said you were exaggerating and lying.

 

I swear I have looked at the content on the that Facebook page multiple times and I haven't seen a single half-nude, or bikini women or anything near like that in any of the pictures. The only thing I saw were women with no hijabs or the ones with a really bad hijab, and if you see that as anywhere like half-nude than your living in an imaginary world. This is not the best way to defame a Facebook campaign and there are other ways that you can possibly find do that.

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Ultimately, you have to recognize that whatever extent YOU feel decency and modesty should be enforced (and remember: you DO feel that this should be enforced; most of the world does) is arbitrary. So you are judging a nation's laws by your own arbitrary measure.

 

This is exactly right.  Only those with intellectual honesty will admit this.  Others will try to cower behind grandiose or loftier values.  When in reality its just exerting one's imagery and fantasy.  Some see their favorite entertainers with fancy hair styles waving around, and want to be just like them.  This "cause" doesn't seem as prolific when you put it in those terms. the rudimentary principle of human desire and envy. 

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Can I ask a question to my fellow Shia chatters, I am fine with your other statements about how governments should implement laws to tackle people's clothing in a way it doesn't appear in a way close to being nude.

 

I know many Muslim women in places like Pakistan, Turkey and in countries in North Africa don't wear hijab but they wear hijab in the mosque/hosseiniye, so I was wondering from Islam's overall perspective is a strong must for a women for women to wear hijab outside the places of worship? I personally knew when I was growing up many women who usually are quite religious but they don't wear Hijab.

 

Is not wearing hijab really break the decency and modesty of women? I mean personally I don't see how it does but I am not to sure what the different Islamic perspectives are on this issue? I think too much on a secularist and moderate platform, so it would be nice if someone could elaborate.
 

To get to the point I will bring back this post.

 

Some interesting research I found on this issue.

 

http://arabsinamerica.unc.edu/identity/veiling/hijab/

 

Why do some Muslim women not wear the hijab?

 

Like the women who choose to wear the hijab, those who choose not to wear the hijab do so for a variety of reasons. Some Muslim women believe that although the principles of modesty are clearly outlined in the Qu’ran, they perceive the wearing of the headscarf as a cultural interpretation of these scriptures. These women sometimes believe that the values espoused by the wearing of the headscarf can be achieved in other ways. Some women believe that while the hijab allowed women in the past to engage in public society without garnering attention, the headscarf in contemporary Western society brings more attention to women and is thus contradictory to its original purpose. Others believe that the hijab and other external practices have become inappropriately central to the practice of Islam, and instead choose to focus on their internal and spiritual relationship with God.

 

While some women might choose not to wear the hijab, most Muslim women agree that it is a woman’s choice whether or not she wears the hijab. Many Muslim and Arab women who have chosen not to wear the hijab are often staunch advocates of a woman’s right to choose to veil.

 

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Mohandes, this is what I asked you:

 

Can't the logic you used about hijab be applied to drug consumers and providers? 

 

But let it go and just take a look at your post again.

 

Still your analogy with drug dealers and addicts is quite bizarre and there is not point defending it. I swear you are not making any sense out of it either. This is ridiculous, anyway drug dealers and their victims the drug addicts not just effect themselves, they are also mentally and socially effecting their families and friends overall, you know this issue had cause separations and divorces in Iran and a bunch of other sad issues  I will still stick to my last post on this as there is no point repeating myself. I  know your against this campaign set out by some Iranian women but there are many other suitable way to criticise them and their "logic" instead of trying to be some smart aleck and trying to compare these two unrelated issues.

 

 

Seriously, it's good that you can realize something, at least.

 

But you should know that, generally speaking, things like not observing hijab also have affected societies. It is now an accepted fact in sociology and psychology and governments have moral duty and responsibility to preserve modesty in the country and hijab law is one the necessities to achieve this goal. And when we say blocking immoral social networks or hijab law should be implemented has reasons like what you mentioned regarding drugs. I do believe that immorality and immodesty(immorality and immodesty according to an Islamic point of view) caused much more problems in the world than narcotic drugs.

 

In both cases, they can claim it is their choice and no one can prevent them, but they are correct just in a case we agree that we are not living in a society.

 

Of course it cannot be dictated and needs support of majority as well, which is the case in Iran. 

 

I think that was clear and I will try not to continue and repeat myself again.

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Is not wearing hijab really break the decency and modesty of women? I mean personally I don't see how it does but I am not to sure what the different Islamic perspectives are on this issue? I think too much on a secularist platform, so it would be nice if someone could help me understand.

 

Well, in certain beliefs and social systems, the concepts of protection, modesty, and harmony are placed in higher value than broad, relatively uninhibited free choice for its own sake (the secularist worldview).  Some people will see the former as individual restriction, but others will see it as social emancipation and liberation.  And for the latter, some will hold it as the penultimate human value (again, the secularist worldview), while others will see it as reckless and meaningless, since promotion of good is all that matters, even through direct means, rather than rolling the dice and hoping good arrives through the fallacy of individual whim. 

 

And to be perfectly honest, Iran's laws could be a whole lot stricter.  To a secularist, money grinder, Nietzsche reading Westerner, they are off the charts.  But to those really familiar with Islam's positions, Iran's legislation and enforcement are actually pretty lax, all things considered. 

 

One of our compatriots discussing the principle of hijab:

 

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I get you felt so offended by my post that you had to get a mod to edit just a small portion of it because I said you were exaggerating and lying.

 

I swear I have looked at the content on the that Facebook page multiple times and I haven't seen a single half-nude, or bikini women or anything near like that in any of the pictures. The only thing I saw were women with no hijabs or the ones with a really bad hijab, and if you see that as anywhere like half-nude than your living in an imaginary world. This is not the best way to defame a Facebook campaign and there are other ways that you can possibly find do that.

 

 

these are few of the many(all of them have that Fb page's stamp on them:)).. and zendegi if you half even a ounce of morality you will  apologise to me here where you called me a liar ... twice..... but I know people like you will come up with something else to be offended about

Edited by Ali Musaaa :)
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these are few of the many.. and zendegi if you half even a ounce of morality you will should come and apologise to me here where you called me a liar ... twice..... but I know people like you will come up with something else they find offensive in my post...

You had to go into months of content and cherry picked the worst ones you could find on that page. The clear MAJORITY of the photos are simply without the hijab or a bad hijab. Hundreds of Iranian women post their pictures without hijab to the campaign, your obviously going to find the ones who are not as decently dressed and its not fair for them to simply toss out their photos as well, where it will lose the campaigns global appeal and purpose. A lot of the photos are meant to be distant similarities and analogies to other countries in the past and present.

 

Let these people campaign and do what they feel is right for their country. I am not going to speak for or against them.

 

Also I have seen Lebanese women without hijab supporting good old Nasrallah and Hezbollah. Are they any different to the ones who supporting the group and people with only difference being Hijab? I also happened to find this on the same Facebook page, but I have seen elsewhere on TV and the news.

 

]11181197_1158691097478316_75931966855826

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The multiquote option is not working for me right now, so please bear with my random shots here.

To the persons talking about ptotecting men from sin, why is the onus upon women? Just like it's unfair to bar non-fasting people from being able to purchase food or drink in Ramadan (though folks might challenge this too), it seems strange logic to force hijab on women. Is the abstainer's iman so weak as to be shaken by displays of food, or uncovered hair, for that matter?

As for the question about what believers would do when Imam e Zamaan comes and enforces hijab, well- this is a geunine question- would he? From what I've read, neither the Prophet, nor the first Imam did so in their eras of governance- please correct me if I'm wrong.

I have to admit though, that what baradar_jackson (I hope I got that right) said makes logical sense. Almost every place has a dress code that its residents are expected to abide by. And yes, I've heard the reasoning that it's an Islamic state, as per the locals' wish expressed in that referendum after the Revolution, so the Islamic dress being enforced is not wrong. What I don't get is the leap of logic in between. Like I asked before, how do we know that an Islamic government may enforce the Islamic code of dress? To call it a country's cultural/ national requirement is understandable; I'm not so sure about the religious aspect.

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I wrote a very long answer, but it got deleted after I clicked post, because it redirected me to another page. I wasn't logged in... this is too confusing! Why is the reply box there if you're not logged in! I thought I was still logged on :( Can we change this? I spent an hour writing it- no joke! :'( I'm going to go cry now... 

 

Oh well. 

 

Tomorrow ishallah.

Fee aman Allah ... 

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I wrote a very long answer, but it got deleted after I clicked post, because it redirected me to another page. I wasn't logged in... this is too confusing! Why is the reply box there if you're not logged in! I thought I was still logged on :( Can we change this? I spent an hour writing it- no joke! :'( I'm going to go cry now... 

 

Oh well. 

 

Tomorrow ishallah.

Fee aman Allah ... 

there is an autosave option, reload the page and click the lower right hand corner( i think) where it says restore autosaved content and hopefully your post will come up :)

 

@Zendegi... you lived up to my expectations.... :D

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(salam)

 

Hijab is a standard of decent dress.

 

Like baradar I think wrote above, personal preferences is not a "human right" if they conflict with Islam.

 

Example, there was a girl in our old neighborhood that walked across town in her bikini everyday to the swimming pool --until the police stopped it.

 

A good example of contrived anti-Hijabi junk that I saw was when Iranian Women's Soccer Team was banned from the last Olympics (I think this was the event) because FIFA said "they might choke on their hijabs".

Of course, as we all know, these hotshots are all now under indictments for financial crimes and bribery. (Hmmm, I wonder if they took a US gov't agency bribe to ban Iranian women?)

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Can I ask a question to my fellow Shia chatters, I am fine with your other statements about how governments should implement laws to tackle people's clothing in a way it doesn't appear in a way close to being nude.

I know many Muslim women in places like Pakistan, Turkey and in countries in North Africa don't wear hijab but they wear hijab in the mosque/hosseiniye, so I was wondering from Islam's overall perspective is a strong must for a women for women to wear hijab outside the places of worship? I personally knew when I was growing up many women who usually are quite religious but they don't wear Hijab.

Is not wearing hijab really break the decency and modesty of women? I mean personally I don't see how it does but I am not to sure what the different Islamic perspectives are on this issue? I think too much on a secularist and moderate platform, so it would be nice if someone could elaborate.

To get to the point I will bring back this post.

they may think the only non mahraam person to them is Allah!!!!

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Can I ask a question to my fellow Shia chatters, I am fine with your other statements about how governments should implement laws to tackle people's clothing in a way it doesn't appear in a way close to being nude.

 

I know many Muslim women in places like Pakistan, Turkey and in countries in North Africa don't wear hijab but they wear hijab in the mosque/hosseiniye, so I was wondering from Islam's overall perspective is a strong must for a women for women to wear hijab outside the places of worship? I personally knew when I was growing up many women who usually are quite religious but they don't wear Hijab.

 

Is not wearing hijab really break the decency and modesty of women? I mean personally I don't see how it does but I am not to sure what the different Islamic perspectives are on this issue? I think too much on a secularist and moderate platform, so it would be nice if someone could elaborate.

 

To get to the point I will bring back this post.

I dont wear hijab, but I still consider myself modest. I dont understand hijab the way people put it, particularly "its meant to save the men" notion - you can wear yards upon yards of hijab/niqab but a man who wants to stare at you, or get lustful WILL end up doing it. I have and still know plenty hijabis, and the looks they still receive although they are all covered up are SICK - disgusting i'd say so the whole its meant to save men and women both thing just doesnt make sense to me - but this could be part of my upbringing as we (the whole of my family) have never had any liking of hijabis mostly because of the filth we have seen them spew from within their niqabs and hijabs and all that. 

 

Considering I dont wear hijab, does that make me immodest? No it doesnt and frankly speaking, they say looking at hair may make men lustful, but i dont see the point - i guess men would be more lustful looking at a woman's body instead of her hair..like i said, just my two cents and yes it may be twisted but hey, we all have our own perspectives.

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@Zendegi,his name is Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah,pls show some respect.Christans are also in favor of hezbollah.

Nobody here said that without hejab one can't love IRI,rahbar or Sayyed Hassan. Lebanon is not an islamic republic in which the majority of the people like in Iran voted for an islamic constitution which includes a certain dressing code.

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The hijab is for men, not women.  I don't think women understand how difficult it is for man to see or be around women who are not covered up.  Hijab is a mercy for men, and a protection for women.  Us women have to be kinder to our men folk, that's why we should be as covered as possible so that men can get on with their daily lives.  I love my hijab now more than ever, and I hope my daughter will too.  

 

Hijab is not obligatory for slaves, so your logic isn't good.

 

Men aren't animals, and a lot of guys get much more attracted to women that are covered up, because your imagination can send more powerful signals to your brain than your eyes can.

Edited by Ali_Hussain
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I think people are also forgetting that hijab is not restrcted to head coverings. It entails a lot more than wrapping ones head in coloured fabric. Covering the hair is just one aspect of it. Observing hijab also means to refrain from wearing colourful and tight clothing that will attract attention from the opposite sex. This also goes for those weird metro guys who wear super tight coloured pants..

 

We weren't created to walk around and turn as many heads as we can. You were created to serve Allah and His creation. We have a chance to 'dress to impress' and thats to whom Allah has given us in marriage.

 

 

Hijab is obligatory for slaves, so your logic isn't good.

 

Men aren't animals, and a lot of guys get much more attracted to women that are covered up, because your imagination can send more powerful signals to your brain than your eyes can.

 

 

I think you meant its not* obligatory?

 

 

someone please please reply to magma.


looks like he is talking to himself.

 

 

That's what happens when you sign up to be a one-man SC Development Team.

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@Zendegi,his name is Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah,pls show some respect.

I mean how was I not showing respect?  Yeah I get his a Seyed and I also get his name is Hassan. Just because I didn't say his full name doesn't mean I disrespect him. Now that I think of it, why should he deserve my respect? How did he in anyway benefit or help me? His just simply keen on fighting a war with Israel, and bowing down to Assad and using Iranian money which could have been used to build infrastructure and helped to benefit Iranians which had instead been used to fight foolish wars in the region.

 

Hezbollah has become a useless entity after Israeli withdrawal and they should give up their arms and become a political party like Amal. Lebanon should rely more on the Lebanese Army and help improve them.

 

Mina I know you are deeply passionate for things like Hezbollah, Nasrallah, Khamenei, Basiji, Velayat Faghih and all this other weird stuff. But do you think I would also be interested in this stuff just as much as you?

 

The issue with the 1979 referendum in Iran, it was kind of flawed in that the referendum simply asked "Islamic Republic Yes or no?". It didn't elaborate too much on what sort of Islamic Republic it would be as there are many different variations of the same concept (if voted yes) and what sort of non-Islamic republic (if voted no) like communist republic, monarchy or secular democracy.   So it confused many people like my family and thousand or if not millions of others. People didn't know what was to come for them if they voted "no". The hate for the Shah and the former regime was so strong after the revolution, people were willing to vote anything that didn't have to do with the past regime. There wasn't a clear and understandable choice so, Islamic Republic it was and then the war boosted the longevity of the regime ever since till now.

 

I have to say simply how lucky and shrewd was Ayatollah Khomeini and his followers were in the whole standoff after the revolution which was also hijacked by them. They were brilliant in their tactics even better than what the Americans and British achieved after the 1953 coup.

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You said 'good old Nasrallah' ist that respectful?

Hezbollah is fighting takfiris,this benefits mankind. Daesh would be in Beyrout if it were not for the Sayyed and Hezb.May Allah make them victorious and destroy their enemies.Make a thread about this topic and we can discuss there.Same goes for the rest of your post . It's another topic.

I don't care in what you are interested but if you talk to ppl about those topics you should show some respect.

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I mean how was I not showing respect?  Yeah I get his a Seyed and I also get his name is Hassan. Just because I didn't say his full name doesn't mean I disrespect him. Now that I think of it, why should he deserve my respect? How did he in anyway benefit or help me? His just simply keen on fighting a war with Israel, and bowing down to Assad and using Iranian money which could have been used to build infrastructure and helped to benefit Iranians which had instead been used to fight foolish wars in the region.

 

Hezbollah has become a useless entity after Israeli withdrawal and they should give up their arms and become a political party like Amal. Lebanon should rely more on the Lebanese Army and help improve them.

 

Mina I know you are deeply passionate for things like Hezbollah, Nasrallah, Khamenei, Basiji, Velayat Faghih and all this other weird stuff. But do you think I would also be interested in this stuff just as much as you?

 

The issue with the 1979 referendum in Iran, it was kind of flawed in that the referendum simply asked "Islamic Republic Yes or no?". It didn't elaborate too much on what sort of Islamic Republic it would be as there are many different variations of the same concept (if voted yes) and what sort of non-Islamic republic (if voted no) like communist republic, monarchy or secular democracy.   So it confused many people like my family and thousand or if not millions of others. People didn't know what was to come for them if they voted "no". The hate for the Shah and the former regime was so strong after the revolution, people were willing to vote anything that didn't have to do with the past regime. There wasn't a clear and understandable choice so, Islamic Republic it was and then the war boosted the longevity of the regime ever since till now.

 

I have to say simply how lucky and shrewd was Ayatollah Khomeini and his followers were in the whole standoff after the revolution which was also hijacked by them. They were brilliant in their tactics even better than what the Americans and British achieved after the 1953 coup.

So this is what imam meant when he said "eslame amrikahi".

Thank you for being a good example.

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stealthy freedom page highlights.

 

Support of green fitna

 

Making fun of Shohada

 

Making fun of islamic values

 

They share pictures from Anti-hijab rally held in tehran in the times of imam khomeini but they never have the nerve to show the pictures of rally who was also organised by women of Iran, the next day, in response of those women.

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The issue with the 1979 referendum in Iran, it was kind of flawed in that the referendum simply asked "Islamic Republic Yes or no?". It didn't elaborate too much on what sort of Islamic Republic it would be as there are many different variations of the same concept (if voted yes) and what sort of non-Islamic republic (if voted no) like communist republic, monarchy or secular democracy.   So it confused many people like my family and thousand or if not millions of others. People didn't know what was to come for them if they voted "no". The hate for the Shah and the former regime was so strong after the revolution, people were willing to vote anything that didn't have to do with the past regime. There wasn't a clear and understandable choice so, Islamic Republic it was and then the war boosted the longevity of the regime ever since till now.

 

 

Very good point. I don't think people realized what they were signing up for when they voted "Yes" in that referendum.  Certainly not clerical rule.  While I believe that most Iranians wanted a government based on the laws of Islam, no one had any idea of what an Islamic Republic was supposed to look like.  You can have a democratic Islamic Republic like Iraq without clerics running the country.  

 

Nevertheless, it's unfair to put all the blame on the system of government in Iran.  It's not perfect but it can work if the right people are in power.   In the aftermath of the revolution Iran was plagued by internal turmoil, an 8-year long war, and economic sanctions that wrecked havoc on the country and has lasting effects to this today.  Not to mention all of the Arab countries and Western nations that ganged up on Iran.  Don't think any government would have come out unscathed under those conditions.

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 based on basic language understanding your statement implies that head scarf and bikini are the samething and should be treated the same, so I responded.

 

do I need to explain your own words further for you?

 

This is the post I made in reply to your post saying that you agree to decent clothing being enforced but you disagree with hijab being enforced. 

 

"What is the difference? I swear I can't understand people.........decent clothing plus a peace of extra clothing on the hair..... how much of a burden is it? can someone please explain this? 

Why is it such a BIG deal to throw something on the hair? How is it much different than the decent clothing you suggest?

I will never understand it."

 

I still fail to see where on my post I implied that hijab and vikini are the same thing. I was simply trying to understand how a Muslim agrees to wear modest clothes but refuses the extra step of covering the hair. I was asking, how much of a burden could complying to wear a head scarf is? (In Iran)

 

I don't understand the Iranian women who complain about being forced to wear the hijab in Iran when they literally put no effort on it and just throw some shawl on their hair and leave half of their head uncover.

 

Anyway just so next time you don't publicly judge someone with no understanding of what he/she said.

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Very good point. I don't think people realized what they were signing up for when they voted "Yes" in that referendum.  Certainly not clerical rule.  While I believe that most Iranians wanted a government based on the laws of Islam, no one had any idea of what an Islamic Republic was supposed to look like.  You can have a democratic Islamic Republic like Iraq without clerics running the country.  

 

Nevertheless, it's unfair to put all the blame on the system of government in Iran.  It's not perfect but it can work if the right people are in power.   In the aftermath of the revolution Iran was plagued by internal turmoil, an 8-year long war, and economic sanctions that wrecked havoc on the country and has lasting effects to this today.  Not to mention all of the Arab countries and Western nations that ganged up on Iran.  Don't think any government would have come out unscathed under those conditions.

 

Except Iraq (post-Saddam), Syria and a great deal of Lebanon :)

Edited by The Batman
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