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Ethics

1991 Uprising In Iraq Against Saddam L.a [Doc]

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Must Watch. Proceed with caution due to very explicit and mature content

 

 

Following the Saddam invasion of Kuwait and the subsequent gulf war which left the Iraqi army battered. The Iraqi people rose to free themselves from the shackles of Saddam. Large parts of Iraq fell to the people, the city of Karbala withstood the Saddam aggression for over two weeks. This film attempts to recollect the events that took place in that tragic period.

 

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^ Hello,

 

Please provide proof of the sanctions killing over 500,000 Iraqi children.  

 

Thanks,

David

 

http://www.globalissues.org/article/105/effects-of-sanctions

 

http://www.theguardian.com/theguardian/2000/mar/04/weekend7.weekend9

 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2000/may/27/iraq.sarahboseley

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1995/12/01/world/iraq-sanctions-kill-children-un-reports.html

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanctions_against_Iraq#Effects_on_the_Iraqi_people_during_sanctions

 

When asked on US television if she [Madeline Albright, US Secretary of State] thought that the death of half a million Iraqi children [from sanctions in Iraq] was a price worth paying, Albright replied: “This is a very hard choice, but we think the price is worth it.”

 

In addition, As UNICEF and other United Nations bodies and officials have reported, the sanctions (which the U.S. and U.K., primarily, refused to have lifted), added to the death toll since 1991 and was estimated to be close to 1 million deaths up to 1998 with mass starvations and disease (while Saddam Hussein had remained unaffected, and he himself sometimes used that for political advantage). Up to half of these are said to have been be children, but the 500,000 number has been controversial based on the methods of data collection and estimation. Other estimates suggest 227000. In any case, the sanctions have been crticized for targeting Iraqi people and not Saddam Hussein’s regime.

 

BAGHDAD - A senior U.N. official said Friday about half a million children under the age of 5 have died in Iraq since the imposition of U.N. sanctions 10 years ago.

Anupama Rao Singh, country director for the U.N. Children's Fund (UNICEF), made the estimate in an interview with Reuters.

``In absolute terms we estimate that perhaps about half a million children under 5 years of age have died, who ordinarily would not have died had the decline in mortality that was prevalent over the 70s and the 80s continued through the 90s,'' she said. A UNICEF survey published in August showed the mortality rate among Iraqi children under 5 had more than doubled in the government-controlled south and center of Iraq during the sanctions. Baghdad said the UNICEF survey proved that the sanctions were killing thousands of children every month and called for an immediate end to the embargo.

 

 

"Denis Halliday was appointed United Nations Humanitarian Coordinator in Baghdad, Iraq as of 1 September 1997, at the Assistant Secretary-General level. In October 1998 he resigned after a 34-year career with the UN in order to have the freedom to criticise the sanctions regime, saying "I don't want to administer a programme that satisfies the definition of genocide""

 

Halliday's successor, Hans von Sponeck, subsequently also resigned in protest, calling the effects of the sanctions a "true human tragedy".[37] Jutta Burghardt, head of the World Food Program in Iraq, followed them.

 

And on and on and on....

Edited by King

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Hello,

 

From the New York Times article you posted as proof,

 

"The Security Council responded to these concerns earlier this year when it offer Iraq the opportunity to sell $2 billion worth of oil to purchase food and medicines under United Nations supervision, the second such offer in four years. Iraq rejected both as infringements of its sovereignty and has continued to demand an unconditional end to sanctions.'

 

From you Wiki article you post as proof,

 

"As the sanctions faced mounting condemnation for its humanitarian impacts, several UN resolutions were introduced that allowed Iraq to trade its oil for goods such as food and medicines. The earliest of these, Resolution 706 of 15 August 1991, allowed the sale of Iraqi oil in exchange for food. Resolution 712 of 19 September 1991 confirmed that Iraq could sell up to $1.6 billion USD in oil to fund an Oil For Food program.

In 1996, Iraq was allowed under the UN Oil-for-Food Programme (under Security Council Resolution 986) to export $5.2 billion USD of oil every 6 months with which to purchase items needed to sustain the civilian population. After an initial refusal, Iraq signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in May 1996 for implementation of that resolution. The Oil-for-Food Programme started in October 1997, and the first shipments of food arrived in March 1998. Twenty-five percent of the proceeds were redirected to a Persian Gulf War reparations account, and three percent into United Nations programs related to Iraq.

While the programme is credited with somehow improving the conditions of the population, it was not free from controversy itself. Denis Halliday, who oversaw the Programme, believed it was inadequate to compensate for the adverse humanitarian impacts of the sanctions. The U.S. State Department criticized the Iraqi government for inadequately spending the money, exporting food, and refusing to accept the program for several years after it was offered in 1991.[56] In 2004/5 the Programme became the subject of major media attention over corruption, as allegations surfaced such as that Iraq had systematically sold allocations of oil at below-market prices in return for some of the proceeds from the resale outside the scope of the Programme; investigations implicated individuals and companies from dozens of countries. See Oil For Food Programme - Investigations."

 

As you see, as early as 1991 Iraq was allowed to sell oil for food and medicine.  But, refused to do so.

 

And, why were the sanctions imposed?  Again from Wiki,

 

"The original stated purposes of the sanctions were to compel Iraq to withdraw from Kuwait, to pay reparations, and to disclose and eliminate any weapons of mass destruction."

 

Remember Saddam's invasion of Kuwait resulting in over 20,000 dead?

 

Sanctions didn't kill children in Iraq.  A brutal regime killed children in Iraq. 

 

All the Best,

David

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Hello,

 

From the New York Times article you posted as proof,

 

"The Security Council responded to these concerns earlier this year when it offer Iraq the opportunity to sell $2 billion worth of oil to purchase food and medicines under United Nations supervision, the second such offer in four years. Iraq rejected both as infringements of its sovereignty and has continued to demand an unconditional end to sanctions.'

 

From you Wiki article you post as proof,

 

"As the sanctions faced mounting condemnation for its humanitarian impacts, several UN resolutions were introduced that allowed Iraq to trade its oil for goods such as food and medicines. The earliest of these, Resolution 706 of 15 August 1991, allowed the sale of Iraqi oil in exchange for food. Resolution 712 of 19 September 1991 confirmed that Iraq could sell up to $1.6 billion USD in oil to fund an Oil For Food program.

In 1996, Iraq was allowed under the UN Oil-for-Food Programme (under Security Council Resolution 986) to export $5.2 billion USD of oil every 6 months with which to purchase items needed to sustain the civilian population. After an initial refusal, Iraq signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in May 1996 for implementation of that resolution. The Oil-for-Food Programme started in October 1997, and the first shipments of food arrived in March 1998. Twenty-five percent of the proceeds were redirected to a Persian Gulf War reparations account, and three percent into United Nations programs related to Iraq.

While the programme is credited with somehow improving the conditions of the population, it was not free from controversy itself. Denis Halliday, who oversaw the Programme, believed it was inadequate to compensate for the adverse humanitarian impacts of the sanctions. The U.S. State Department criticized the Iraqi government for inadequately spending the money, exporting food, and refusing to accept the program for several years after it was offered in 1991.[56] In 2004/5 the Programme became the subject of major media attention over corruption, as allegations surfaced such as that Iraq had systematically sold allocations of oil at below-market prices in return for some of the proceeds from the resale outside the scope of the Programme; investigations implicated individuals and companies from dozens of countries. See Oil For Food Programme - Investigations."

 

As you see, as early as 1991 Iraq was allowed to sell oil for food and medicine.  But, refused to do so.

 

And, why were the sanctions imposed?  Again from Wiki,

 

"The original stated purposes of the sanctions were to compel Iraq to withdraw from Kuwait, to pay reparations, and to disclose and eliminate any weapons of mass destruction."

 

Remember Saddam's invasion of Kuwait resulting in over 20,000 dead?

 

Sanctions didn't kill children in Iraq.  A brutal regime killed children in Iraq. 

 

All the Best,

David

 

Unfortunatley, the time clock doesn't start when people choose it too. The so called weapons of mass destruction and the piles of weapons and the green light Saddam had was handed to him by the Americans, Germans, UK to invade iran just a few years before.

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Unfortunatley, the time clock doesn't start when people choose it too. The so called weapons of mass destruction and the piles of weapons and the green light Saddam had was handed to him by the Americans, Germans, UK to invade iran just a few years before.

How many Iranian died in Iraqi Iranian war?

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Hello,

 

Where do we start the clock?  With the Ottoman invasion?  With the Mongol invasion?  With the Arab Muslim invasion?  With the Sassanid invasion?

 

The piece of land known as Iraq has known many invaders.  The latest being daesh. 

 

I do think we are seeing an end game emerge.  What is now called Iraq will be divided into Sunni, Shia and Kurdish states.  And, while Sunni and Shia power brokers will scream and claim it is an evil plot by the West, I do think it is in the best interest of all "Iraqis."

 

Just my two cents.

 

All the Best,

David

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Hello,

 

From the New York Times article you posted as proof,

 

"The Security Council responded to these concerns earlier this year when it offer Iraq the opportunity to sell $2 billion worth of oil to purchase food and medicines under United Nations supervision, the second such offer in four years. Iraq rejected both as infringements of its sovereignty and has continued to demand an unconditional end to sanctions.'

 

From you Wiki article you post as proof,

 

"As the sanctions faced mounting condemnation for its humanitarian impacts, several UN resolutions were introduced that allowed Iraq to trade its oil for goods such as food and medicines. The earliest of these, Resolution 706 of 15 August 1991, allowed the sale of Iraqi oil in exchange for food. Resolution 712 of 19 September 1991 confirmed that Iraq could sell up to $1.6 billion USD in oil to fund an Oil For Food program.

In 1996, Iraq was allowed under the UN Oil-for-Food Programme (under Security Council Resolution 986) to export $5.2 billion USD of oil every 6 months with which to purchase items needed to sustain the civilian population. After an initial refusal, Iraq signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in May 1996 for implementation of that resolution. The Oil-for-Food Programme started in October 1997, and the first shipments of food arrived in March 1998. Twenty-five percent of the proceeds were redirected to a Persian Gulf War reparations account, and three percent into United Nations programs related to Iraq.

While the programme is credited with somehow improving the conditions of the population, it was not free from controversy itself. Denis Halliday, who oversaw the Programme, believed it was inadequate to compensate for the adverse humanitarian impacts of the sanctions. The U.S. State Department criticized the Iraqi government for inadequately spending the money, exporting food, and refusing to accept the program for several years after it was offered in 1991.[56] In 2004/5 the Programme became the subject of major media attention over corruption, as allegations surfaced such as that Iraq had systematically sold allocations of oil at below-market prices in return for some of the proceeds from the resale outside the scope of the Programme; investigations implicated individuals and companies from dozens of countries. See Oil For Food Programme - Investigations."

 

As you see, as early as 1991 Iraq was allowed to sell oil for food and medicine.  But, refused to do so.

 

And, why were the sanctions imposed?  Again from Wiki,

 

"The original stated purposes of the sanctions were to compel Iraq to withdraw from Kuwait, to pay reparations, and to disclose and eliminate any weapons of mass destruction."

 

Remember Saddam's invasion of Kuwait resulting in over 20,000 dead?

 

Sanctions didn't kill children in Iraq.  A brutal regime killed children in Iraq. 

 

All the Best,

David

 

It is really disgusting to see you defend such a horrendous sanctions regime, I didn't think you would stoop this low, you shouldn't blame others of blindly beating the drums of their favorite regime in the face of mounting evidence against them while you do the same.  Every single human rights body and your own compatriots have harshly condemned and spoken out against it, please check your conscience and give all this a rest, if you have an ounce of empathy for the innocent children of Iraq.

 

Look at the top of this thread, it mentions that there was a very courageous uprising against Saddam post the war while he was relatively weak, the Iraqi people bravely could have overthrown their dictator.  Instead a brutal sanctions regime was imposed, which strengthened Saddam and weakened the resistance.  Of course Saddam rejected the aid, why wouldn't he?  Thanks to the US, he was having a field day.  The whole argument about the security counsel offering a little bit of aid is irrelevant because the sanctions themselves were highly immoral and unjustified in the first place, whether Saddam had weapons or not, they only helped him.  This is standard and known to all serious political historians/analysts, sanctions typically help the state while hurting the population by increasing their dependency on the state for help.

 

This isn't about what Saddam could have done, he was an enemy of the Iraqi people, this is about what the worlds most powerful nation could have done to prevent the death of countless Iraqi children which the US was complicit in killing.  There is no crime against the United States that even comes close to comparing to this, and yet you still deflect blame, pathetic.

Edited by King

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^ Hello,

 

Your desire to demonize the United States blinds you.

 

And, not just on this thread but on countless others.  You have been taught since birth the United States is the center of all that is evil.

 

The world is not so black and white.  I do my best to point this out but hatred has caused the hearts of some to become like stone.

 

All the Best,

David

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