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Saintly_Jinn23

How Does One Read Sahifat Al-Sajjadiyya?

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I am rather confused by some of the supplications in the Sahifat. For example, in Supplication 32:

 

 

11- O God,Thy knowledge watches over hidden works, every covered thing is exposed before Thy awareness, the intricacies of things are not concealed from Thee, and unseen mysteries slip not away from Thee.
 

12- But over me Thy enemy has gained mastery: He asked a delay from Thee to lead me astray, and Thou gavest him the delay! He asked a respite from Thee until the Day of Doom to misguide me, and Thou gavest him the respite!
 

13- So he threw me down, though I had fled to Thee from small, ruinous sins and great, deadly works, until, when I had yielded to disobeying Thee and merited Thy anger through my bad efforts, he turned the bridle of his treachery away from me, met me with the word of his ingratitude, undertook to be quit of me, turned his back to flee from me, threw me to the desert of Thy wrath alone, and sent me as an outcast into the courtyard of Thy vengeance.

 

Obviously statements like those above cannot in any way refer to the Imam (as) himself, who is protected from all sins and grievous errors and does not ever obey the evil whims of Satan or God's enemies. I am not discussing the authenticity of the du'a, but I get confused whenever I read the Sahifat and stumble upon these sort of statements, whether I am intended to interpret these supplications as being the personal du'a of the Imam himself in reference to himself or simply supplications given by the Imam Zayn al-Abidin (as) for believers to whom they are most relevant.

 

However, in the translations of the Sahifat, the du'a are often ordered with titles such "His Supplication for himself and the People Under His Guardianship" and "His Supplication in Repentence" "His Supplication for Help in Repaying Debts" etc. which imply we are meant to believe these were du'a the Imam must have personally used, which might make sense for some of them, but certainly not those which if personally used by the Imam himself would imply sinfulness or error on his part. :donno:

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In reality, Imam (As) didn't just supplicate this Duas for himself but also, it is to show us how to supplicate. How to open up to our creator. 

 

The Prophet (S) said, ' Verily if my heart feels an excitable emotion, I seek forgiveness from Allah for it seventy times a day.' [Mustadrak al wasail V.5 P.320 No. 5987] 

 

Ya Ali Madad 

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In reality, Imam (as) didn't just supplicate this Duas for himself but also, it is to show us how to supplicate. How to open up to our creator. 

 

The Prophet (S) said, ' Verily if my heart feels an excitable emotion, I seek forgiveness from Allah for it seventy times a day.' [Mustadrak al wasail V.5 P.320 No. 5987] 

 

Ya Ali Madad 

 

Yes, but my question is with regards to those du'a that are attributed to the Imam (as) in the Sahifa, are we to read these as though they were necessarily his own personal du'a or as du'a he gave to his followers which he may or may not have actually had a need for himself.

 

In the case of those du'a which imply sinfulness and obedience to Satan on the part of the supplicator, to say that the Imam (as) performed these du'a for himself and didn't just give them to those who needed them would imply HE is guilty of these things, which would contradict his position as ma'sum.

 

I'm not asking if he showed people how to supplicate through demonstration, but if one is reading the Sahifa, are they to imagine the Imam performing these du'a for himself or him simply giving them to those who need them? This is also important when dealing with the authenticity of the book as a whole, since if the second is the case, there is less of a need to feel that a du'a may be inauthentic due to its content, since the content is not implying anything against our established and authentic creeds.

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To me, it feels like the Imam عليه السلام is trying to tell us that whatever you are—infallible or not—we will never give Allah سبحانه وتعالى what he deserves. To those who are spiritually uplifted, even sleeping is considered negligence (غفلة) because for a few hours you're not doing any worshipping.

 

I have also heard that the Sahifa was actually political but he عليه السلام changed it to a form of supplication to not cause any problems. I do not know the authenticity of this claim so I am going to type it as [uncertain] and let someone prove it.

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Its quite simple really, it is in the piety of such highly elevated chosen servants of Allah to always lower themselves when speaking with Allah. Them praying for forgiveness, doesnt imply they have sinned, just as the above. Remember, the Imam A.S not only wrote these for himself, but obviously kept his followers in mind. I honestly dont see any issue with such statements, as it personally puts me in awe, and a huge punch to the face, that wakes me up from the sleep of this sinful nature that consumes me in this world. If the blessed Imam A.S, who is infallible, speaks with such conviction, where am I going to end up? May Allah raise us with the Imam A.S on judgement inshAllah, by the truth of this supplication.

Edited by Ethics

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To me, it feels like the Imam عليه السلام is trying to tell us that whatever you are—infallible or not—we will never give Allah سبحانه وتعالى what he deserves. To those who are spiritually uplifted, even sleeping is considered negligence (غفلة) because for a few hours you're not doing any worshipping.

 

Its quite simple really, it is in the piety of such highly elevated chosen servants of Allah to always lower themselves when speaking with Allah. Them praying for forgiveness, doesnt imply they have sinned, just as the above. Remember, the Imam A.S not only wrote these for himself, but obviously kept his followers in mind. I honestly dont see any issue with such statements, as it personally puts me in awe, and a huge punch to the face, that wakes me up from the sleep of this sinful nature that consumes me in this world. If the blessed Imam A.S, who is infallible, speaks with such conviction, where am I going to end up? May Allah raise us with the Imam A.S on judgement inshAllah, by the truth of this supplication.

 

The issue I don't think is a matter of the content. Regardless of whoever wrote any of the supplications in the Sahifa, most if not all are beautiful and remain perfectly suitable for most people in all periods of time who seek closeness to God.

 

But to say the Imam "lowered himself" in this case just isn't a suitable rationalization. We have other hadith and du'a by the Prophet (as) and the Ahlul Bayt where they "repent" for the fact that their worship does not do one such as God justice. That is of course, humility, but they do not imply any "sin" on the part of the Ma'sum, they imply the opposite: that what they do is good, but certainly not as much as what God deserves, which of course can be given by no one. The "repentance" in that case is of the inadequacy of the worshiper to truly worship God as he deserves be worshipped, even if he is the Prophet (as), but of course  it is by the mercy and forgiveness of God that he nonetheless accepts what one can give in sincerity.

 

That's different than what some of the supplications of the Sahifa imply if we are to read them as Imam al-Sajjad's actual supplications for HIMSELF. And I think the notion of "lowering himself" doesn't work here, because there are other precedents in the lives of the Imams of them lowering themselves without accusing themselves of things which they never did.

 

Again, it is not a question of authenticity here, though this tie into the question of the authenticity of the Sahifa, but HOW one is supposed to read the book, as the Imam's own personal supplications or as supplications given as a gift by the Imam, but which he did not necessarily use with reference to HIMSELF.

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Where does the Imam accuse himself? Lowering does not imply lowering ones status, but the Imam A.S is perfect, and even then he knows he is nothing in front of the almighty. You want him to pray about how great he is in front of Allah?

 

What do you mean how is one suppose to read a supplication? Its a Dua, a prayer, whats the difference? The Imam wrote this for himself? Or for his companions? For us brother, use it, always.

Edited by Ethics

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Where does the Imam accuse himself? Lowering does not imply lowering ones status, but the Imam A.S is perfect, and even then he knows he is nothing in front of the almighty. You want him to pray about how great he is in front of Allah?

 

It doesn't make a lick of sense for an infallible Imam who by definition is guarded from Satan and ever mindful and obedient to God's will to say "So he (God's enemy) threw me down, though I had fled to Thee from small, ruinous sins and great, deadly works, until, when I had yielded to disobeying Thee"

 

You can't just brush that off as the Imam lowering himself and being humble. Which is why I ask HOW you are supposed to read that, as the Imam saying HE has disobeyed God, or is the supplication merely GIVEN by the Imam for those who have disobeyed God to recite for themselves, but the Imam never recited such a thing for himself because he was never guilty of a sin and therefore had no need to ask for forgiveness for disobeyind any command from God?

 

It's a simple question. One which I ask because I'm not sure if the Sahifa is necessarily supposed to reflect the Imam's own thoughts about himself or is just a book of du'a for us and nothing else. If what the Sahifa is saying is that such du'a as those which imply the supplicator has sinned were actually used by the Imam himself to ask forgiveness for HIS sins, then I can't accept that because the Imams don't sin, ever, nor do I think it makes any sense for the Imam to pretend as though he is a sinner when he knows for a fact that he is not and when he nothing to repent for as far as sins are concerned. Now, if the du'a in the Sahifa attributed to the Imam (as) are meant to simply be du'a he GAVE to the believers for THEM to use and are not necessarily the supplications he always made for himself, then there's no issue. Again, simple question: how do you read it.

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It doesn't make a lick of sense for an infallible Imam who by definition is guarded from Satan and ever mindful and obedient to God's will to say "So he (God's enemy) threw me down, though I had fled to Thee from small, ruinous sins and great, deadly works, until, when I had yielded to disobeying Thee"

 

You're speaking about logic but what we're witnessing is emotion.

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You're speaking about logic but what we're witnessing is emotion.

 

But there are plenty of instances of the Imam expressing emotion with regards to God without saying he has disobeyed Him. Emotion can't be used as an excuse for speech that is plainly false with respect to the Imam.

 

I am not saying the Imam DID NOT give this supplication, but I do see an issue with someone claiming the Imam gave a supplication where the supplicator admits having disobeyed God and followed God's enemies and saying that the Imam used the same supplication himself when he (pbuh) never disobeys God or follows his enemies.

 

It makes sense for people who have disobeyed God to ask for forgiveness for disobedience, it does not make sense for the Imam to ask for that kind of forgiveness. Again, it may be a matter of how one reads the Sahifa itself, which is why I ask the question how you are supposed to read it or understand the context of the du'a found in the book. If the context is these are supplications given by the Imam to the faithful to recite for their benefit, then there's no problem here, but if someone is saying that the supplication is based on a supplication the Imam performed for his own forgiveness for disobeying God, that is a problem.

 

I'm sorry, I still don't get what the issue is. I see no problem.

 

You don't see any problem with the idea of the infallible and sinless Imam saying "I have disobeyed God?"

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Remember the purpose of Supplication is to debase yourself, talk of your shortcomings, your faults and humiliate your self when talking with most exalted and knowledgeable God. This way, the supplicator is indicating, O Allah! I'm nobody, and I'm an insignificant and lowly slave of yours, I have come to your door wanting to talk with my Beloved and ask Him for mercy and Forgiveness. Whatever I have, and Whomever I seem to be is because of your generosity and kindness. Without your help I would certainly perish, O Allah! you are my protector, my cherisher and my nourisher and You are ALL I have..

 

Imam Sajjid (as) in Dua e Abu Hamza Thumali says, ' I knew of you by you, and you directed me to you and called me to you, and without you I would not have known what you are.' 

 

In Dua e Kumail Imam Ali (as) says, ' O Allah! my trails and sufferings have increased and my evilness has worsened...... My God! My Master! thou decreed a law for me but instead I obeyed my own low desires and I did not guard myself against the allurements of my enemy [iblis] he deceived me with vain hopes whereby I was led astray' We all know, The commander of Faithful Imam Ali (as) was free of such things. 

 

The Imams of Ahlul Bayts (as) gave us this great supplications because on our own, we would not have known how to talk and open up to our Lord. The same way,our Lord, the most High teaches us in Surah Fatiha [ the beginning or first half], how to praise our Lord. 

 

I hope This helps

 

Ya Ali Madad  

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I suggest you read this preface by the translator: http://www.al-islam.org/sahifa-al-kamilah-sajjadiyya-imam-zain-ul-abideen/translators-introduction

 

Asking Forgiveness

As is well known, the Shi'ites hold that the Imams are `inerrant' or `sinless' (ma'sum, from the verb `isma, which means to be preserved by God from sins). The reader of the Sahifa will be struck by how often Zayn al-'Abidin asks God to forgive his sins, employing all the standard terms (ithm, dhanb, ma'siya, etc.). To be surprised at this or to suggest that therefore the Shi'ites are wrong to call the Imams sinless is to miss the points which have just been made about the shahada as the root of Islamic spirituality. It is not my concern to defend the dogma of `isma, but I should at least point out that one cannot object to it on this level.

 

According to various hadiths, the Prophet used to pray for forgiveness seventy or one hundred times a day by repeating the formula `I pray forgiveness from God' (astaghfiru llah), a formula which is pronounced universally by practicing Muslims. Muslims hold that all prophets are sinless, and the Prophet Muhammad is the greatest of the prophets, yet no one has ever seen any contradiction between his asking forgiveness and his lack of sins. One easy but shallow way of explaining this is to say that the Prophet was the model for the whole community, so he had to pray as if he were a sinner, since all those who followed his sunna and recited the prayers which he taught would be sinners. But to say this is to suggest that he was a hypocrite of sorts and to lose sight of the meaning of the shahada.

 

Christians have never doubted Christ's divinity because he said: `Why do you call me good? No one is good but God alone' (Mark 10:18). Here, in Christian terms, is a concise statement of the shahada as applied to the lives of God's creatures. In as much as anything can be called created, it is `other than God' and less than absolutely good. God is possessor of mercy, knowledge, love, life, power, will, patience, and so on - the `ninety-nine names of God' provide a basic list of the divine attributes. If something `other than God' possesses any of these attributes, it clearly does not possess them in the same way that God possesses them. They belong to God by the fact that He is God, but if they belong to the creatures in any sense, it is by His bestowal, just as the creatures have received their existence through His creation.

 

This basic teaching of the shahada means that nothing and no one - not even the greatest of the prophets - stand on a par with God. Since goodness is a divine attribute, `None is good but God alone', and everything other than God is evil at least in respect of being `other'. `Evil' here may be another name for `lesser good', and no one in the Islamic context would dream of attributing evil to the prophets.

 

Nevertheless, the prophets in as much as they are human beings cannot be placed on the same level as God. The respect in which human beings differ from God is all important for the spiritual life. It is man's clinging to the difference his own servanthood, his own createdness, his own inadequacy, his own sinfulness - which allows him to fulfill what is required of him as the creature of his Lord. Just as the Prophet is first `abduhu, `His servant', and only then rasuluhu, `His messenger', so also every human being must first actualize the fullness of his own servanthood before he can hope to manifest anything on behalf of his Lord.

 

The greater a person's awareness and knowledge of God, the greater his awareness of the gulf between the `I' and the Divine Reality. As the Qur'an says:

 

Only those of His servants fear God who have knowledge (35:28).

 

The greater the knowledge of God and self, the greater the understanding of the claims of independence and pride that are involved with saying `I', and so also the greater the fear of the consequences. Those nearest to God fear Him more than others because they have grasped the infinite distance that separates their created nature from their Creator; hence also they are the most intense in devotion to Him, since they see that only through devotion and worship can they fulfill His claims upon them.

 

No Muslim can think that he has reached a point where he no longer has need for God's forgiveness, so no Muslim can stop praying for it. Moreover, the overriding goodness of God and the nothingness of the creatures demands that a pious act can never belong to the servant. To the extent that a human being is able to do what God wants from him, this is because God has granted him the power to do so.

 

The well-known formula wa ma tawfiqi illa bi-llah, `I have no success except through God', is of universal application. In the last analysis, no good act can be attributed to the servant - the merit is always God's (for example, Supplication 74.2). It is here that the mystery of God's ever-present and immanent reality manifests itself, such that there is nothing left of the creature but a face of God turned toward creation.

 

If the Prophet and the Imams constantly prayed for forgiveness with the utmost sincerity, this does not contradict the idea that they were `sinless', since the sins envisaged here entail a willful disobedience to the divine command, not the `creaturely sin' of being other than God. Later authorities invariably distinguish among levels of sinfulness as also among levels of virtue, a doctrine epitomized in the oft-quoted saying, `The good qualities of the pious are the bad qualities of those brought near to God' (hasanat al-abrar sayiyyat al-muqarrabin).

 

At least three basic levels are distinguished for every positive human quality, though these levels are not exclusive and may coexist in various degrees within a single person depending upon his spiritual maturity. The examples of `repentance' (tawba) and `asking forgiveness' (istighfar) can illustrate these points.

In the Sahifa the Imam often asks God for success in repentance, which may be defined as turning toward God through acts of obedience and avoiding disobedience. The later authorities speak of a first level of repentance belonging to the faithful in general, who sin by breaking the commands of the Shari'a and who repent by asking God to forgive their sins and trying their best not to repeat the sin. In other words, their repentance pertains basically to the level of the activities governed by the Shari'a while the forgiveness they seek means that they ask God to pardon any act of commission or omission which is contrary to the Shari'a.

 

On the second level of repentance there are those who have dedicated their lives to God and spend their waking moments in careful observance of the details of the Shari'a and following the recommended acts of the sunna. Such people, who might be called the `pious' in keeping with the above saying, have no difficulty following the practical commands and prohibitions of the Shari'a, so they turn their attention toward the inward attitudes which should accompany the outward activities.

 

They repent of the heedlessness (ghafla) of their own souls, which are unable to remember God with perfect presence. They see their acts of obedience as falling short of the ideal because of their inward weaknesses and the various forms of blindness and hypocrisy which Satan is able to instill into their hearts, such as the temptation to ascribe their piety and diligence in observing the Shari'a to themselves. They repent not of sinful acts, since they observe the Shari'a with exactitude and do not `sin' according to the Shari'ite definitions. Rather, they repent of inappropriate thoughts and intentions and ask God to forgive these whenever they occur.

 

The third level is that of `those brought near to God'. They have passed beyond outward and inward sins, since they see nothing but God's will, guidance, and mercy in every act and every thought, but they are still faced with the greatest of all barriers, that of their own self, the `supreme veil' between man and God. God has given them knowledge of Himself and of themselves, so they have come to understand that the `I' can never be totally innocent or sinless. They repent of their own inadequacies as creatures and ask forgiveness for their own existence as separate beings.

 

Western readers may object that there is something artificial about this division of `repentance' into levels. How can one `repent' of one's own existence? How can one ask forgiveness for something which is not one's own fault? These objections might be valid if the texts had originally been written in English, but in fact the objection arises because of the difficulty of translating the concepts of one religious universe into another.

 

The original Arabic words translated as `repentance' and `forgiveness' convey meanings far broader than the English terms, both of which are connected with a sentimental and moralistic sense of guilt. (Similar problems, it should be remarked, exist with much of the terminology which is normally used to translate Islamic texts and which has also been employed - because there is no other real choice - in the present translation of the Sahifa.)

 

The word tawba or `repentance' means literally to `turn' or `return' from one thing to another. One of God's Qur'anic names is al-tawwab, `He who turns', and the verb from this root is used both for God's turning toward man and man's turning toward God. Man's `repentance' refers to every level of turning away from self and towards God; it makes no difference whether the self is conceived of as a tissue woven of sins or as the veil of ignorance and heedlessness that pertains to one's creaturely situation. There may be a moralistic sense attached to the word in a particular context, and there may not.

 

In a similar way, maghfira in Arabic is far richer than the term `forgiveness' in English. To begin with, the Qur'an attributes three different divine names to God from this root, al-ghafur, al-ghaafir, and al-ghaffar, and subtle distinctions are often drawn to differentiate the different modes of `forgiveness' which they imply. More importantly the root meaning of maghfira is `to cover over', `to veil', `to conceal'. Hence the `Forgiver' is He who veils human sins and inadequacies. In Arabic the literal sense of saying `I pray forgiveness from God' is `I ask God for concealment.' Most people may understand that they are asking God to conceal their `sins', but `those brought near to God' will see that they have need for the concealment of something much deeper and more radical since it is inherent to every created thing.

 

When the Prophet or Imam Zayn al-'Abidin ask God to `forgive their sins, they are perfectly sincere in this request, but this does not necessarily imply that their sins lie at the same level as our own. As Islamic texts frequently remind us, qiyas bi l-nafs, `judging others by one's own self', is always misleading, especially if the others happen to have been the recipients of God's special favours.

 

 

Just to put a blanket statement out there, not everything in that book is authentic, it may be some things people have actually attributed to the Imam a.s

 

http://www.al-islam.org/sahifa-al-kamilah-sajjadiyya-imam-zain-ul-abideen/preface-concerning-chain-authorities-sahifa

Edited by Ethics

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Just to back up the beautiful explanation of my brother [ Ethics], I will present some Hadiths  relating to seeking forgiveness.

 

The Prophet (S) said, 'The best act of worship is seeking forgiveness.' [ Nur al-Thaqalayn, V.5 P.38 NO.44]

 

The prophet (S) said, ' Increase your seeking of forgiveness, for verily Allah, Mighty and Exalted has only taught you to seek forgiveness because He wants to forgive you.' [ Tanbih al-Khawatir V.1 p.5]

 

The Prophet (S) said, ' Whoever seeks forgiveness in abundance, Allah will give him relief from every distress and an outlet from every source of anxiety.' [ Nur al-Thaqalayn, V.5 P.357 NO.45] 

 

Ya Ali Madad 

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When the Prophet or Imam Zayn al-'Abidin ask God to `forgive their sins, they are perfectly sincere in this request, but this does not necessarily imply that their sins lie at the same level as our own. As Islamic texts frequently remind us, qiyas bi l-nafs, `judging others by one's own self', is always misleading, especially if the others happen to have been the recipients of God's special favours.

 

I find this a little deceptive to be perfectly honest and it appears to skirt around the actual issue by playing with words. Either the Prophets and Imams are sinless (ma'sum) or they are not. Plain and simple. To sin is to disobey God and the Shi'ite school is emphatic in its stance that the Imams do not commit sins of ANY kind, minor or major, hidden or apparent.

 

I have read the preface to the translation before and I have never been convinced by the author's argument on this point. It sounds more like the author is trying to rationalize something that can't really be rationalized in the way he wants simply because he finds the supplications to be good, ignoring the fact that what he has said is basically that the Imams sin on one level but not another or even "pretend to be sinners." I find such beliefs to border on blasphemy personally. The Imams are sinless on all levels. Period.

 

As I said, it would have been far easier for him to say that the supplications in question are meant for the reader to whom it is most relevant for them to use, not necessarily the Imam's own words regarding himself because he has no need to repent of sins at all, thus he has no need of such supplications himself.

 

According to various hadiths, the Prophet used to pray for forgiveness seventy or one hundred times a day by repeating the formula `I pray forgiveness from God' (astaghfiru llah), a formula which is pronounced universally by practicing Muslims. Muslims hold that all prophets are sinless, and the Prophet Muhammad is the greatest of the prophets, yet no one has ever seen any contradiction between his asking forgiveness and his lack of sins. One easy but shallow way of explaining this is to say that the Prophet was the model for the whole community, so he had to pray as if he were a sinner, since all those who followed his sunna and recited the prayers which he taught would be sinners. But to say this is to suggest that he was a hypocrite of sorts and to lose sight of the meaning of the shahada.

 

Christians have never doubted Christ's divinity because he said: `Why do you call me good? No one is good but God alone' (Mark 10:18). Here, in Christian terms, is a concise statement of the shahada as applied to the lives of God's creatures. In as much as anything can be called created, it is `other than God' and less than absolutely good. God is possessor of mercy, knowledge, love, life, power, will, patience, and so on - the `ninety-nine names of God' provide a basic list of the divine attributes. If something `other than God' possesses any of these attributes, it clearly does not possess them in the same way that God possesses them. They belong to God by the fact that He is God, but if they belong to the creatures in any sense, it is by His bestowal, just as the creatures have received their existence through His creation.

 

I already addressed this point in a previous post. To ask for forgiveness for the inadequacies of one's worship is different. We have plenty of narrations where the Prophet (pbuh) asked for forgiveness yes, but most of these do not include him asking for forgiveness for "sins" of any kind and are often accompanied by his or the Imams mention of the inadequacy of their worship to do complete justice to a supreme being who is beyond comprehension and whose mercy and love cannot be matched, even by the most pious of his creations.

 

This is completely different form of repentance than that of the repentance of sins, as it does not imply any sin at all.

 

The problem if we take the preface's approach on a rational level is that we then cannot be certain about the Imams' infallibility. It jeapordizes the very principles and order infallibility is theoretically intended to protect. The infallibility of the Imam is so that no can accuse him of anything and thus have just reason to reject his authority. If the Imam pretended to be a sinner without clarification along the lines of "I am just pretending in order to show you how you, as sinners, should do this," then he is to blame if people are led to believe he is not infallible because he has presented a false image of himself which leads people away from the truth. If you say the Imam is not sinless on all levels, there is no reason to obey him in absolutely all matters.

 

The citation of apparent contradictions in the Christian scriptures and Christian doctrines is irrelevant here, since many Christians ignore or doubt many things in the gospel literature that contradict their theological presumptions and such matters as those pertaining Jesus' humility statements and his divine claims as they are related in the gospels are not for us to decide nor are they universally agreed upon by the Christian churches. For example, many Christians would argue for the separation of Jesus' divine and human natures based on statements like those found in Mark 10:18 such as the Duophysites and I have read many Unitarian, Muslim, Deist and Jewish arguments that have made use of such passages to prove that Jesus (pbuh) taught he was just a prophet. So such a paragraph in the preface strikes me more as a way to deflect criticism of the author's premise, which is flawed if you ask me.

 

Just to put a blanket statement out there, not everything in that book is authentic, it may be some things people have actually attributed to the Imam a.s

 

It's not an issue of authenticity for me though. I am not so much in doubt as to the provenance of the supplications of the Sahifa, as I am in doubt as to the interpretation one finds in such statements as the preface. If the Imam (as) or the Prophet (pbuh) wrote or recited a supplication in repentance of sins, I can not under any circumstances believe that he wrote or recited it for himself. In which case, if such a supplication is an authentic one, it must, logically, be for others to recite not for the Imam himself. If the Imam or Prophet pretended to be sinners to give an example, they must also have been clear and honest that they were just pretending as well.

Edited by Saintly_Jinn23

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Just to put a blanket statement out there, not everything in that book is authentic, it may be some things people have actually attributed to the Imam a.s

 

salam alaykum

 

I've read into the chain of Sahifat Al-Sajjadiyya last year and there is some weakness but I don't think it's a good reason to disqualify the book. If I recall correctly Syed Alikhan in his Riyadh Al-Salikeen (a commentary on Safihat Al-Sajjadiyya) lists more than one chain for this book - I'm not sure if it was in Riyadh Al-Salikeen or not but I have come across more than just one chain for this dua book.

 

wallahu alam

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Jinn, my brother, make your life simpler, just dont recite it. This book means the world to me, and like I have mentioned time after time, there is not an iota of confusion or doubt for me. It is beyond clear. I will recite it till the day I die. If you dont understand it, its okay my brother, its a dua, we have countless numbers of them. Choose another. It is from the Imam, there are authentic chains, more than one.

Edited by Ethics

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Jinn, my brother, make your life simpler, just dont recite it. This book means the world to me, and like I have mentioned time after time, there is not an iota of confusion or doubt for me. It is beyond clear. I will recite it till the day I die. If you dont understand it, its okay my brother, its a dua, we have countless numbers of them. Choose another. It is from the Imam, there are authentic chains, more than one.

Ugh, for the last time, I'm not doubting the authenticity. I'm saying I don't think the Imam ever asked for forgiveness for disobedience or committing sins and so if the dua is authentic, the Imam must not have recited such dua that speak of repentance for disobedience for himself.

 

If we were speaking of lesser prophets who are not of the same rank of infallibility as the Imams, perhaps such du'a would apply to them in certain instances, but not to the Imams who are the pique of infallibility in all respects with regards to their station before God and the Prophet (pbuh).

 

Again, I think the Imam could have transmitted du'a that he didn't necessarily use for himself at anytime because it was what WE needed to recite, not him.

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You want a plain and simple answer. Think of it that, Imam (as) wrote these duas for us, not for himself Because when we [ourself] read the Dua, We are going to mention or use the word "I", not "They".

 

If the Imams supplicated these Duas for themselves and and for their adherents,  the word "I" and "They" should have been used for conveying different messages. 

 

Here is Quran proofing the infallibility of Ahul Bayt (as), I guess this should clear you from any doubt, if Not, you have a PROBLEM SON! 

 

إِنَّمَا يُرِيدُ اللَّهُ لِيُذْهِبَ عَنكُمُ الرِّجْسَ أَهْلَ الْبَيْتِ وَيُطَهِّرَكُمْ تَطْهِيرًا

People of the house, God wants to remove all kinds of uncleanliness from you and to purify you thoroughly.(33:33)

Ya Ali 

Edited by Ghulam e Ale Mohammad

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It doesn't make a lick of sense for an infallible Imam who by definition is guarded from Satan and ever mindful and obedient to God's will to say "So he (God's enemy) threw me down, though I had fled to Thee from small, ruinous sins and great, deadly works, until, when I had yielded to disobeying Thee"

You can't just brush that off as the Imam lowering himself and being humble. Which is why I ask HOW you are supposed to read that, as the Imam saying HE has disobeyed God, or is the supplication merely GIVEN by the Imam for those who have disobeyed God to recite for themselves, but the Imam never recited such a thing for himself because he was never guilty of a sin and therefore had no need to ask for forgiveness for disobeyind any command from God?

It's a simple question. One which I ask because I'm not sure if the Sahifa is necessarily supposed to reflect the Imam's own thoughts about himself or is just a book of du'a for us and nothing else. If what the Sahifa is saying is that such du'a as those which imply the supplicator has sinned were actually used by the Imam himself to ask forgiveness for HIS sins, then I can't accept that because the Imams don't sin, ever, nor do I think it makes any sense for the Imam to pretend as though he is a sinner when he knows for a fact that he is not and when he nothing to repent for as far as sins are concerned. Now, if the du'a in the Sahifa attributed to the Imam (as) are meant to simply be du'a he GAVE to the believers for THEM to use and are not necessarily the supplications he always made for himself, then there's no issue. Again, simple question: how do you read it.

Salamalaikum

To me it is the imam a.s reciting for himself as well as teaching it to the momineen/muslimeen. It is very similar to the verse in Quran which talks about prophet asws's present and future sins being forgiven.

The tafaseer(exegisis) talk about rasool Allah saww considering sins of his Shias as his sins and seeking Allah azwj's forgiveness and imams a.s being as infallible as the prophet saww practice his Sunna .

Note: this shouldn't encourage people to sin.

Ya Ali Madad

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Salam :)

First of all, the question should be who 'named' these supplications - the Imam himself or the ones who collected them? Personally, I doubt that it was the Imam himself (since there are still questions about how authentic these duas are), so someone else did according to the contents of each dua - and if there was no obvious indication that this dua wasn't about the Imam himself, they distributed it to him.

12- But over me Thy enemy has gained mastery: He asked a delay from Thee to lead me astray, and Thou gavest him the delay! He asked a respite from Thee until the Day of Doom to misguide me, and Thou gavest him the respite!

Secondly, these are references to the Quranic verses about Iblis:

7:14 He said, ‘Respite me till the day they will be resurrected.’

7:15 Said He, ‘You are indeed among the reprieved.’

7:16 'As You have consigned me to perversity,’ he said, ‘I will surely lie in wait for them on Your straight path.

7:17 Then I will come at them from their front and from their rear, and from their right and their left, and You will not find most of them to be grateful.’

7:18 Said He, ‘Begone hence, blameful, banished! Whoever of them follows you, I will surely fill hell with you all.’

Also found in 15:36-43 and 38:79-86

13- So he threw me down, though I had fled to Thee from small, ruinous sins and great, deadly works, until, when I had yielded to disobeying Thee and merited Thy anger through my bad efforts, he turned the bridle of his treachery away from me, met me with the word of his ingratitude, undertook to be quit of me, turned his back to flee from me, threw me to the desert of Thy wrath alone, and sent me as an outcast into the courtyard of Thy vengeance.

Reference 59:16 [Or] like Satan,

when he prompts man to renounce faith,

then, when he renounces faith,

he says, ‘Indeed I am absolved of you.

Indeed I fear Allah,

the Lord of all the worlds.’

What I'm trying to say is this: We can see the similarities between the contents of those parts of the dua to Quranic verses about Iblis which indicates that these are references (and reading the verses further, they say that Iblis will lead the people astray save for the pious servants of Allah). And if we read this dua further, we see that the Imam (as) discribes the 'process'of someone who's been mislead by Iblis (due to some lack in his faith)- it happens all the time, doesn't it?

Thus, for me it's clear that this supplication is for us and not the Imam himself as they discribe the struggles of every 'normal' believer, not one specific. There are also lines such as 'My belief is not firm' which should be enough for us to dismiss the notion that the Imam has written this for himself- at least, if one knows what kind of person Imam Sajjad (as) was. There's a reason he's called al-Sajjad, after all! If someone worships Allah as much as he (as) did (day and night, being in prostration so much and so often that the skin on his forehead started to peel off) how can their faith not be firm? Also, at the end of this supplication it said "Oh Allah, bless Muhammad and his Household when the pious are mentioned" - the last part indicates that Muhammad (pbuh) and his Household are pious, obviously (though, I wasn't sure if it means to bless them whenever one them is mentioned, thus calling them directly pious or meaning to do so when any pious Muslim is mentioned, though it comes to the same conclusion, either way) - and Allah Himself says that Iblis won't be able to mislead the pious and those He wills (as He leads whomever He wants), so it's not possible that the Imam has sinned since the Ahl-ul-Bait are the most pious and they are those whom Allah purified as he willed.

Besides, there are always such duas that make some doubt whether the one who wrote it is referring to himself or he wrote it for someone else. There are people, for example, who take Dua Kumail as a proof that Imam Ali (as) isn't infallible- although, that dua was written for someone else and not the Imam himself. So, even if they talk in the first person, it isn't necessary that they talk about themselves. It's a little bit like novels which are written in the first person view- so that the reader feels like he/she is that the protagonist.

Lol, I hope that that made some sense? :P

Wa salam.

Edited by Noor al-Batul

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There is an interpretation of the verses in Quran where Prophet asks forgiveness for his sins and is promised forgiveness for his sins, it refers to believers. The tradition is attributed to Imam Retha. There is an interpretation that the believers are considered on tree/body, and the root of the tree is God/Mohammad and trunk is Ali/Fatima and the branches are the Imams, and the fruit is their knowledge, and the leaves are the believers. There is hadiths believers are created from the clay of Imams and this probably refers to this unity of identity as well.

 

These du'as could have multipurpose where they are intercessory prayers by the Imams for their followers, they as well are primarily to be read by their followers in reference to themselves.

Edited by StrugglingForTheLight

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