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In the Name of God بسم الله

Living As A Muslim In Usa

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You know, speaking of racism, something that I do find disappointing is racism among Muslims and especially towards reverts.  Instead of making a conscious effort to include reverts in things, often times they're ignored and not really made to feel like part of the community.

 

Part of the problem is that most of our cultures emphasize being modest and conservative (no free mixing, etc) so much that we've closed ourselves off.  Also there are those idiots that also judge people based off skin color, which is another cultural issue that needs to go away.

 

In my opinion, everyone is at least a little bit racist or bigoted.  I know I have my faults when it comes to this, but on the outside I at least try my best to treat everyone like I'd like to be treated - with respect and dignity.

Those are great points, and it's true about reverts kind of being on the fringe.  I experienced that with the masjid I somewhat attend.  I definitely stand out; I'll say that.  But with that said, I think it's more the conservative mindset, and I don't take any offense at that.  My heritage is mostly English, so I get the reserved and somewhat closed off thing.  At the end of the day, it's a human issue.  We all have our prejudices, but I feel like that's a test from Allah (s.w.t.) to overcome the prejudices and get to know each other.  It's one reason I love to learn languages and to travel.

 

inshAllah we all follow the example of the Holy Prophet (PBUH) and our Imams (AS) in how they treated all people well regardless of their race or color.

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Hey, you're in Rhode Island?  I was in Newport recently.  I tried finding any sort of Masjid (Sunni or Shia) while I was there, but was unsuccessful.  For future reference, would you happen to know of one in Newport?

Sure am!  That's pretty awesome.  Newport is beautiful.  Were we buried in snow yet? :)

There are a couple of masajid.  Unfortunately there are no Shi'a masajid in RI, but I know CT and MA have some.  The masjid that I attended (mainly Hanafi and a few Shaf'i, although I am pretty sure I've seen a few Shi'a brothers there as well) is in North Smithfield.  It's on Sales hill road.  Super easy to get to.  Plus RI is so small, it's probably a 20 minute drive from newport at most.

 

For anything in southern RI, you might have to trek to the URI area.  There is an Islamic community center on Fortin Rd. in Kingston.  Here's the link: http://masjidalhoda.com/.

 

Hey if you're in RI in the future, let me know!  We have another brother here who is in RI and is a Shi'a.

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Hey, you're in Rhode Island?  I was in Newport recently.  I tried finding any sort of Masjid (Sunni or Shia) while I was there, but was unsuccessful.  For future reference, would you happen to know of one in Newport?

 

Sure am!  That's pretty awesome.  Newport is beautiful.  Were we buried in snow yet? :)

There are a couple of masajid.  Unfortunately there are no Shi'a masajid in RI, but I know CT and MA have some.  The masjid that I attended (mainly Hanafi and a few Shaf'i, although I am pretty sure I've seen a few Shi'a brothers there as well) is in North Smithfield.  It's on Sales hill road.  Super easy to get to.  Plus RI is so small, it's probably a 20 minute drive from newport at most.

 

For anything in southern RI, you might have to trek to the URI area.  There is an Islamic community center on Fortin Rd. in Kingston.  Here's the link: http://masjidalhoda.com/.

 

Hey if you're in RI in the future, let me know!  We have another brother here who is in RI and is a Shi'a.

 

Go to new york city. Best Atmosphere shia community wise lol :P

 

I was in Portland Maine not too long ago and ended up just making the trek. 

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But the fact is that it is in the US that Muslims have more rights and opportunities to influence things for the better. When the government does something bad, the citizens have more protection of their rights to protest.

How can they influence things for the better in an defacto oligarchy?

Protection of the right to protest is a good thing in theory but occupy wallstreet showed the reality of the protection of protest.US is a police state.Start with the Patriot Act,NSA and so forth...how are the rights of the citizens protected?

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How can they influence things for the better in an defacto oligarchy?

Protection of the right to protest is a good thing in theory but occupy wallstreet showed the reality of the protection of protest.US is a police state.Start with the Patriot Act,NSA and so forth...how are the rights of the citizens protected?

Those are definitely all valid points, but one thing I have always felt is that there is in the spirit of the American people a sense of rebellion when injustice is pervasive; sadly it typically takes way too long for us to get there, though.  This is all very similar to what happened with the McCarthy "red scare" in the 1950s and the anti-war movement during the 1960s.  The FBI spied and committed horrible acts of intimidation, lying, misinformation, and outright murder.  Look into J Edgar Hoover's pet project COINTELPRO.  8 (I think) college students decided that this was unacceptable and they broke into the Philadelphia FBI office, stole the documents that proved it existed, sent them to all the major news outlets of the time and the story got told.  They all disappeared and never spoke or saw each other again.  One of the men involved said in an interview on NPR that:when the law becomes the mechanism of the crime, it is incumbent upon all of us to disregard and break that law.

 

that's my approximation- the wording may be off a tad, but the sentiment is accurate.

 

My worry is that the young people are too deluded by creature comforts, material possessions, and social media distractions.

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I'm one of those who likes the US too. Its a very beautiful and diverse country which is slowly becoming more and more diverse. :) Am I a minority here? Of course I am. But being a minority here is a lot different than being a minority in a place like Saudi Arabia or Pakistan or even Iran where there is persecution against followers of the Ahlul Bayt(AS) and people of different ethnic backgrounds as Iranians can be very nationalistic. America is like a melting pot. We see Muslims, Christians, Jews, Hindus, Blacks, Whites, Hispanics, Asians and many people of all faiths and ethnic backgrounds living in peace and there is really no one group in this country can have total power and control over another group like we see in Sunni Majority nations or in Pakistan. So yes that is the positive about living here. Now don't get me wrong, of course there is still some parts of this country which are very red and don't like Muslims. Mostly in the southern states or what they call dixie? If you live in one of the mega cities like New York or Los Angeles or Chicago, there is probably very little chance of an incident like this happening as happend in North Carolina.

 

One thing I think we really need to do is strengthen our bonds with each other and build our communities. A lot of us will admit that our communities in the west are fine but reality is they aren't. Some of us, we don't greet people or say salaam to those who we don't like, if its said to us we will ignore it. Some of us will bash our Ullema and scholars and always seek power in the Masjids so we have leverage over them, have seen that many times. Backbiting is very common. Basically we need to work on or manners and learn some respect, myself included. We should think about the Image we are showing of our Imams(AS) and Ahlul Bayt(AS) when we act like I mentioned above. And it seems like I'm getting off topic but it really does matter. A house divided against itself cannot stand. Just wanted to get that out there. Hopefully though. :)          

 

 

I think it's important that we understand that America's government is not homogenous. It's not an autocracy. And so whatever domestic or foreign policies we might understand to be wrong or oppressive should not be used to condemn American politicians or citizens as a whole, many of whom are good people, albeit somewhat ignorant of how the world outside the United States really works and sometimes very gullible.

 

Likewise, in spite of the increasing power of the federal government, there are still many cultural differences between the different states and regions which are almost like countries of their own and different conceptions of the American ideals of democracy and prosperity, sometimes within the same state. California is very different from Texas, and Texas is certainly different from Virgina or Vermont.

 

By and large, domestic policies in the United States may not be geared towards accommodating for Muslims, Shi'a or otherwise, but they are lenient enough, I think most of us would agree, unless one is a stiff necked Wahabi, that a person can live in America and be a good Muslim. And the political processes of the country may not be perfect (then again, what country's politics are?) but I think in America, Muslims can be successful in business, education and politics if they are simply willing to work and study hard. I dislike some of these Muslims who bring this "West vs East," Clash of Civilizations mindset where the United States needs to oppose Islam. That's not to say that America can't be intolerant or aggressive towards Muslim or Muslim countries. And it's not to say that American politicians or capitalists have always had the best interests of Muslims sincerely at heart when dealing with the Muslim world. But I think there are some Muslims who, for their own political or personal reasons, seek to paint an overwhelmingly negative portrait of American life or values. Usually these are just very conservative types whose main concern is kids listening to rap music or women not wearing hijab or sexy Victoria's Secret billboards. Other times, however, there are certain people who may try to deflect arguments and criticism against the actions of so-called Islamic governments or political factions they are sympathetic towards by focusing on the negative aspects of American life or policy. That's something I think we need to be careful of.

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(salam)

 

Hameedeh #16:  When my ex first came to the US she wore hijab and about suddenly l started seeing hijabi often  --when before l only saw them around the mosque. Now l see them essentially everyday l go to the stores. lt took only one, l think, to get "the ice broken".

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The one who makes terrorist is the who is preaching democracy and peace.

@Coldcow.. Moslems have nothing to prove. we are well born politicians we know how [Edited Out]s preach truth!!!

Isis Taliban al qaeda Zionist al nusurya and so much more. its all from one same source. The same source goes around preaching human rights democracy ... its all a big joke and there is no hope.

Practice taqiyya and look for a new place of peace!

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