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Khadim uz Zahra

Ayatollah Seestani On Depictions Of The Prophet

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(BISMILLAH)

 

(Salam)

 

So, I was reading this article recently, which claimed that Ayatollah Seestani allows the depiction of the Prophet, as long as it is respectful:

 

"By contrast the leading figure among the Shias of Iraq, Ayatollah Sistani, has said the depiction even of Muhammad is acceptable, as long as it is done with proper reverence."

 

I wasn't aware of this before. Can anyone provide me with a source?

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This is what I was trying to discuss on my topic: http://www.shiachat.com/forum/topic/235027893-is-depicting-the-prophet-saww-actually-forbidden/

 

I've always thought that the actual depiction itself is not forbidden but rather how you're depicting him (saww) and why. If you think that this is exactly how the Prophet (saww) looked then it's wrong, or if you're disrespecting or insulting him then obviously it's wrong, but drawing an illustration of him based on how historical accounts have described him just as a likeness isn't wrong.

 

We have plenty of pictures of the A'immah (as), the same argument that is used for their pictures can be used for the Prophet (saww), I don't see why different rulings should apply to them.

Edited by Eklekticist

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This is what I was trying to discuss on my topic: http://www.shiachat.com/forum/topic/235027893-is-depicting-the-prophet-saww-actually-forbidden/

 

I've always thought that the actual depiction itself is not forbidden but rather how you're depicting him (saww) and why. If you think that this is exactly how the Prophet (saww) looked then it's wrong, or if you're disrespecting or insulting him then obviously it's wrong, but drawing an illustration of him based on how historical accounts have described him just as a likeness isn't wrong.

 

We have plenty of pictures of the A'immah (as), the same argument that is used for their pictures can be used for the Prophet (saww), I don't see why different rulings should apply to them.

I doubt anyone uses historical accounts when drawing these pictures. They just draw pictures of men with beards that they consider to be good looking, which is why they always end up looking Persian. If there was any attempt to use historical accounts, then you would at least see more variation in the skin tone of the Imams for example.

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Even so, as long as you don't end up idolising the picture or truly believing that that's your imam (as), it should be ok.

 

There's no need to be extra sensitive on stuff like this.

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The Economist Newspaper Limited

25 St James's Street

London, GB ( GREAT BRITAIN )

 

MI15 is a UK based Intelligence which is very much interested in sectarian violence inside Shias and Sunnis and In between Shias and Sunnis.

 

Ayatullah Khamnei #letter4u purpose is to get the info directly from right person instead of Media and West.

 

 

 

 

My concern with the topic, however, was specific to Ayatollah Seestani and any sources that would validate this statement from The Economist.

 

 

Why not email him from his site http://sistani.org

Edited by alirex

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I doubt anyone uses historical accounts when drawing these pictures. They just draw pictures of men with beards that they consider to be good looking, which is why they always end up looking Persian. If there was any attempt to use historical accounts, then you would at least see more variation in the skin tone of the Imams for example.

 

Part of the problem with the later Imams is that the accounts of the way they look tend to very. Some hadith say Imam Ridha (as) was dark, while others say he was fairly light. And at other times, they are trying to show light reflecting off of them.

 

With Imam Ali (as), Hasan (as) and Husayn (as) I always found a lot of depictions to be accurate as far as skin tone goes, based on the sources I've read on their appearances, with the exception of a few. When it comes to the later Imams, you might find that the person who made a poster just took an image of one of the early Imams and added just a few little changes and said "this one is Imam Ridha, Musa, etc." The teahouse painters in Iran though tend to have the best skills when it comes to painting religious scenes and icons, while the bazaaris are mostly looking to make inexpensive posters using the same old stock images.

 

I also think that maybe some depictions might be based on dreams or that some people assume the Imams must have all looked very similar.

 

 

My concern with the topic, however, was specific to Ayatollah Seestani and any sources that would validate this statement from The Economist.

 

Ayatollah Sistani's legal views on this matter are discussed here:

 

http://www.islamquest.net/en/archive/question/fa694

http://www.shiachat.com/forum/topic/235027703-pictures-in-islam/

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