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In the Name of God بسم الله

Shia Aqeeda And Christmas At Work Etc

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Salam all,

Although of course we don't celebrate christmas, but live in the Uk. At work/uni events are organised suci as Christmas dinners, secret santa and being expected to wear christmas jumpers etc.

what is the shia stance on this? Of course we don't celebrate but cannot disrespect their religion at the same time. Is it haraam to be involved? especially since we don't have the intention to celebrate.

What are the marjas rulings? I have heard the salafi stance which is totally against it.

Please help..

Sunny x

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dont break peoples heart...just remember how do you feel when they greet you on EID?


Syed Sistani allows exchanging gifts and holiday greetings with members of other religions.  In other words, you can participate if you want to.  Just don't start believing that Jesus is god incarnate and you're fine.  

exactly!!!

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Salam,

 

 

Thank you for your replies. May I reiterate that I have NO INTENTION of celebrating. I would keep it to a minimum only on the basis of respect. They won't have music etc as they are planning to eat out at a restaurant. We are all women in that team but I made it very clear that I will not sit at a table where there is any alcohol. I also said we love and respect Jesus (a.s) and also do not wish to disrespect your religion.  As for gifts, I said about how our scholars allow it, and how there may be some who are very strongly against it. That is due to sectarianism. She was happy with that and respected my wishes. One dinner will be fine in that it will just be pizza and eating out (as we will be going back to work no one will drink) (unless one odd person chooses to drink wine, eww, I will be sitting far away from them lol). The other dinner may be inappropriate due to people drinking etc. and there may be one or two guys there (all the more excuse not to go) I wouldn't go to that one at all and she will clarify that with them. 

 

We can't compromise haraam for people simultaneously we can't disrespect them. Especially when it is their country and the organisers/authority celebrate it and put these things in your online calenders....

 

Wasalam  

 

Sunny x

Edited by sunrise_786
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We can't compromise haraam for people simultaneously we can't disrespect them. Especially when it is their country and the organisers/authority celebrate it and put these things in your online calenders....

 

That sounds fine sister. However, following your religion, should not be seen as disrespecting them. IF anything, due to secularism, they should be utmost respectful of you, and be understanding of your faith, which has nothing to do with disrespecting or hating. This way of thinking makes Islam seem apologetic to other cultures, when it is clearly not. I am sure, if someone died in their family they would choose to not attend any sort of celebration, be it christmas or thanksgiving. Mourning is universal.

 

Sure I see no problem in calling myself an American, as much as I have the right to reject christmas and all these rubbish and pointless holidays. If my work would ever hold any type of gathering, I see myself not attending if it contradicts any of my religious principles. I wouldnt chose to work at a place where they are not understanding and respectful of my faith.

Edited by PureEthics
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In the past, I've made an effort to attend only family friendly (no alcohol) events.  When it was expected of me, I've put in a brief appearance at events where there was alcohol, music, and dancing, but not stayed beyond just greeting my closest colleagues and listening to the company owner give his year-end greetings and congratulations.  I didn't partake of the food because we are forbidden from eating with people who are drinking alcohol.

 

Most of the holiday themed events held by companies that I've worked for have been held during business hours, therefore no alcohol and no craziness.  Some of them have even been almost mandatory.  I recommend at least checking in if everyone else is.  When the time comes for personnel evaluations, your work isn't the only thing considered.  You need to be social enough without being too social.

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Christmas is becoming a much more secular holiday. However, that doesn't mean us muslims should participate. Unless urgent, please rEfrain from mixing in such gatherings. The western world celebrates casual male and female relationships, alcohol consumption, and musix/dance.

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Salam,

 

I'm basing on 19:33. Despite there are still argument on the real birth day of Jesus (as), if the follower celebrate it on 25th of December, well as long as it's the same Nabi, i'm congratulate them. Stay away from Alcohol, mind you. Now, Music, the funny thing is, most music now reminds me to Allah SWT. Even electronic-trance music reminds me of Karbala. Love songs reminds me to the imams. I wonder if there's something wrong with me. 

 

I'm approaching the world with Al-Qur'an's rules but practicing it with Akhlaq. Risalatul al-huquq deeply embedded in my mind. But, when i came to grey area, there's where Marja kick-in. 

 

Wassalam.

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That sounds fine sister. However, following your religion, should not be seen as disrespecting them. IF anything, due to secularism, they should be utmost respectful of you, and be understanding of your faith, which has nothing to do with disrespecting or hating. This way of thinking makes Islam seem apologetic to other cultures, when it is clearly not. I am sure, if someone died in their family they would choose to not attend any sort of celebration, be it christmas or thanksgiving. Mourning is universal.

 

Sure I see no problem in calling myself an American, as much as I have the right to reject christmas and all these rubbish and pointless holidays. If my work would ever hold any type of gathering, I see myself not attending if it contradicts any of my religious principles. I wouldnt chose to work at a place where they are not understanding and respectful of my faith.

 

I see your point but what makes it all the more challenging is the cultural concept. They add everyone in it regardless of faith. I am a student on placement, it is not my actual workplace. They let me wear hijab and pray alhumdulillah. But because they have made it like "everyone should do it". The whole secret santa thing, I never knew of until a name was given in my hand. That is what I mean when I say wouldn't attend where alcohol is being served on the table , music is being played etc.

 

 

They do it more so as a work culture to make their work place more "people friendly". Which is why I only do so on a bare minimum not as a celebration or part of their religious activities. The context in which it is placed makes a huge difference. 

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