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Marbles

Monuments In Pakistan

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Inspired by mina313's thread about Iranian architectural heritage.

 

I invite members to contribute.

 

Here are some high res pics from a recent photo contest covering monuments.

 

Tomb of Mughal Emperor Jahangir in Lahore

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Tomb of Dai Anga, Lahore

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Tomb of Bibi Jawindi, Uch Sharif

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Derawar Fort, Bahawalpur

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Lahore Fort

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Wazir Khan Mosque, Lahore

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Shah Jahan Mosque in Thatta

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Noor Mahal of Abbasi dynasty in Bahawalpur

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Tomb of Shah Rukn-e-Alam, Multan (the second biggest dome in the whole of subcontinent surviving in its original construction from the Sultanate era, circa 800/900 years ago.)

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Tomb of Isma`ili Dai Shah Shams Shabzewari, in Multan, which is now in Ithna Ashari hands.

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Edited by Marbles

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No more wallpapers but some more pics.

 

 

Badshahi mosque, a masterstroke of Mughal architecture, Lahore.

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Bhong Mosuqe, Rahim Yar Khan

 

You can see the influence of Hindu temple complex style of construction in the mosque's design.

 

This was the first piece of architecture I experienced as a kid. It's not far from the village where I spent my early childhood, in the village.

 

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Pic below: see the Farsi poetry on the arch on the right.

 

..chashm-e man fida-e chahar gauhar

Ali, Fatima, Shabbir wa Shabbar

 

but on the left arch it praised the four caliphs too :dry:

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Tomb of Ranjit Singh, Lahore

 

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Inside of Jahangir's Tomb, Lahore.

 

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Makli Hills Necropolis, Thatta, Sindh. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Makli_Hill

 

World Heritage Site: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/143

 

 

 

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Credits: Rahim Katchi (most pics)

 

To be continued...

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Makli Hills Part 2.

 

These are from pre-Mughal times when Sindh was ruled by Samma dynasty and later. Starting in the 1300s CE kings, nobles and scholars continued to be buried here till the British spread across Sindh like cancer and made my paternal ancestors flee to the north, and farther afield.

 

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Gravestone in Farsi, which was the lingua franca of the time. One Khwajah Muhammad Latif, it says, marhoom wa maghfoor, died 26th of Shawwal of the year 1002 Hijri.

 

Have I read it correctly, Farsi speakers?

 

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An open dome to let the air and sun and rain in.

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This is the oldest tomb there, of a son of Nizamuddin II aka Jam Nido, who has the same importance to Sindh's Samma dynasty as Emperor Akbar has to Mughals and Shah Abbas to Safavids.

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The oldest extant latticework carved in stone.

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Edited by Marbles

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Marbles do u know why an open dome..i mean actually dome is for protecting from sun and rain?!

 

If you notice all graves are either uncovered or have open structures built upon them. I am not absolutely certain about this but it relates to a certain local belief that a grave should have a passage for air and light to keep the surroundings 'fresh' and 'bright' so that they don't become 'dark' and 'gloomy'. A shower of rain on the grave was also considered a sign of divine mercy. (Remember this is a very dry and hot region where sun blazes down 40+ Celsius fire for 9 months non-stop). So the closed domed structures common in later times and in cold climes were not common in Sindh.

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Baltit Fort, Hunza Valley, Gilgit-Baltistan. A fort on a hilltop.

 

Foundations laid 700 years ago. This structure dates from 16th century or abouts. On UNESCO World Heritage tentative list.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baltit_Fort

 

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^ Indeed. And unsurprisingly, tea is drunk as national drink there, especially the pink one commonly known as Kashmiri tea. I think it's locally called payu chai.

 

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Edited by Marbles

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Never have I desired to go to Pakistan, but these photos made me feel homesick for a place I've never been. 

 

In the age of internet and easily accessible information countries and places are enjoying unprecedented advertisement for travel and tourism for whatever they have to offer to the new visitors. Unfortunately, the decade and a half internet has been common is the same period in which Pakistan has burned in imported wars and Wahhabi terrorism, so that foreigners have stayed away, developed extremely negative perceptions and don't put Pakistan on their travel itinerary, which makes sense. This has meant that historical places, ancient monuments, culture and magnificent mountain ranges Pakistan has to offer have faded into relative obscurity, because when people don't visit, you don't see their pictures and stories of travel on the web. Even Pakistanis who've been abroad for a decade or two do not know much about what lies in their country of origin. Due to security concerns people can't travel as freely and safely to off-the-track places as they used to till a couple of decades ago.

 

When things calm down and peace is established, which will be done sooner rather than later, because we can't afford not to fix things for 180+ million people, then inshallah you may wish to visit it as part of your South Asian trip.

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These are the ruins of the old Buddhist Gandhara Civilisation dated circa 1000 BC - 500 CE (UNESCO World Heritage List)

 

Places: Taxila and Swat Valley.

 

 

Dharmarajika Stupa, Taxila

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Nimogram Stupa, Swat.

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Amluk-Dara Stupa, Swat. 3rd - 7th century CE

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The Buddha of Jehanabad, Swat. 6th to 7th century CE.

 

For 1400+ years this Buddha sat there in stone, silent and meditating, till, in 2007, the ghastly Taliban concluded that this offended their gutter sensibilities. So they defaced him. We know of the Bamiyan Buddhas in Afghanistan but not about the vandalism they suffered in Pakistan from the jihadist ghouls. Thank God, the area has been cleared of the terrorists and this old Bhudda is now being restored.

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That's how it was before destruction.

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Not far from the above

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“Miracle of Saraswati”, from 2nd century CE, now in Lahore Museum.

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Fasting Siddharta, dating from 1st - 3rd century CE. Now in Lahore Museum.

 

What a fine peace of stone artistry.

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Next pics are of Jaulian monastery, the place has been a ruin since the 5th century CE when Central Asian white Huns invaded and destroyed the place.

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Solid stone structures with intact upper layers tells us it was a three-storey building or higher.

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So these twits decided to pay homage to the Buddhists of yore by enacting a live yoga session at the monastery.

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A monk's cell at Jaulian monastery, niches used to keep personal articles and oil lamps.

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And in case someone decides to take the plunge, here's something useful: http://www.hunzaadventuretours.com.pk/study_tours.html

 

To Be Continued...

Edited by Marbles

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Pretty sure these monuments have been posted already, but there are some pictures I've found that I really like so whatever:

 

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https://www.flickr.com/photos/pakpositive/140177543/

 

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https://www.pinterest.com/haiqac/explore-pakistan/

 

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http://www.emirates.com/ae/english/about/news/news_detail.aspx?article=830432

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That's Jehangir Kothari Parade down in Karachi, established 1920. A Zoroastrian Karachi businessman bequeathed his personal land to the city, built a public garden and this pavilion. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jehangir_Kothari_Parade

 

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Mohatta Palace Museum, Karachi. Built in the tradition of Rajasthani palaces using pink Jodhpuri stones. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mohatta_Palace

 

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And this is the most recognisable monument in Pakistan that related to its founding history. Built on a place where in 1940 a meeting of All India Muslim League was held to announce the demand for a 'separate homeland for Muslims of India.'

 

Minar-e-Pakistan, Lahore.

 

 

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Wiki Loves Earth 2015 photo contest was held recently. The following pic from Pakistan won the first prize.

 

 

The global 2015 edition has seen more than 8,500 contestants participating from 26 countries, with over 100,000 photo submissions throughout the month of May.

 
From Pakistan alone, over 1500 contestants chipped in from across the country to submit more than 11,000 photographs; making it the country with the fourth largest number of submissions and second largest in the number of participants.

 

 
 
Central Karakorum National park, Skardu, Pakistan.
 

 

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The following are some of the pics that were selected for Wiki Loves Monument 2015 contest. http://wikilovesmonuments.pk/

 

 

Faisal Mosque, Islamabad

 

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Abbasia Mosque, Bahawalpur. This marble mosque is right in the middle of the Cholistan desert.

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Khaplu Palace, Khaplu

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Jinnah's Mausoleum, Karachi

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Islamia College University, Peshawar

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Edited by Marbles

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