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The Kafir Gov. Of Saudi To Execute Ayatollah Nimr

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Imam of Tehran and Houthis warn Saudis of executing Al-Nimr

https://www.middleeastmonitor.com/news/middle-east/14730-imam-of-tehran-and-houthis-warn-saudis-of-executing-al-nimr

btw Ansarullah fighters seized yesterday a crossing at the saudi border,may Allah t grant them success....down with the king

http://edition.presstv.ir/iphone/detail.aspx?id=382778

Edited by mina313

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Imam of Tehran and Houthis warn Saudis of executing Al-Nimr

https://www.middleeastmonitor.com/news/middle-east/14730-imam-of-tehran-and-houthis-warn-saudis-of-executing-al-nimr

btw Ansarullah fighters seized yesterday a crossing at the saudi border,may Allah t grant them success....down with the king

http://edition.presstv.ir/iphone/detail.aspx?id=382778

 

The houthi's called the three cities that Saudi Arabia stole their Qibla !

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(salam)
(bismillah)

 

Not that I am condoning this execution, but if you've ever heard al-Nimr's speeches against the Saudi Regime, I don't find it surprising that they want him executed. Let's be honest, if a Sunni scholar living in Iran was saying the same things against the Iranian Regime, he too would be executed, heck they even do that for Shi'a scholars.

 

 

Here are a few excerpts of his speeches:

 

We Should Rejoice in the Death of Crown Prince Nayyef: 

 

Saudi Ayatollah Nimr Al-Nimr Dares Saudi Regime to Attack Iran

 

(salam)

Edited by Nader Zaveri

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(salam)

(bismillah)

Not that I am condoning this execution, but if you've ever heard al-Nimr's speeches against the Saudi Regime, I don't find it surprising that they want him executed. Let's be honest, if a Sunni scholar living in Iran was saying the same things against the Iranian Regime, he too would be executed, heck they even do that for Shi'a scholars.

Here are a few excerpts of his speeches:

We Should Rejoice in the Death of Crown Prince Nayyef:

Saudi Ayatollah Nimr Al-Nimr Dares Saudi Regime to Attack Iran

(salam)

Ws.

Lol, are u going to provide evidence for ur claim about iran? Or should that baseless accusation simply be accepted? Yes there hqve been people with religious knowledge executed- if they have committed a crime worthy of it, such as murder.

Im pretty sure nobody has been executed for saying down with wali-faqih... unless robert spencers islamaphobic news sites are deemed legit sources.

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Condemning Saudi Arabia’s death sentence of Shia cleric Nimr Baqir Al-Nimr protesters gathered in front of the Saudi embassy in Yemen’s capital Sanaa. The protesters carried photos of Al-Nimr and banners demanding his release. “We are all Al-Nimr,” they announced, chanting slogans that expressed their strong opposition to Saudi Arabia and its ruling family.

Previously, Ibrahim Bader Al-Deen Al-Houthi, the brother of the Houthis’ leader Abdulmalik Al-Houthi, had publicly condemned the death sentence of Al-Nimr and warned against his execution. “We warn, and warn, and warn Saudi Arabia against taking any ill-advised actions against Yemenis at the border, and against harming Sheikh Al-Nimr in anyway,” one of Al-Deen Al-Houthi’s Twitter messages read.

In another message he wrote “if the Saudi authorities execute Al-Nimr it will be a criminal act that will not go unanswered.”

High profile Shia leaders in Iran, including the Al-Hawza Association of Shia clergymen and Ala Al-Deen Burujerdi, the head of the Security and Foreign Policy Committee in the Iranian Shura council, also warned Saudi Arabia not to execute Al-Nimr’s verdict and demanded his release.

Ayatollah Khatami himself described the death sentence of Sheikh Nimr as “unfair and unjust.”

Similarly, Amir Abdullhiyan, the Iranian deputy foreign minister for Arabian and African affairs, warned against the repercussions of executing Al-Nimr. “If the death sentence against Nimr Al-Nimr was announced with the knowledge of the Saudi authorities, this without a doubt will ignite feelings and will lead to universal reactions in the entire Islamic world,” he said in a televised interview on Iranian state TV.

In a similar development, Hezbollah released an official statement on Oct. 16, describing the verdict as “unfair and politically charged.”

While the number of Shias voicing their opposition has caused some Yemeni analysts to accuse the Houthi members who oppose Al-Nimr’s death sentence of being “sectarian,” a number of non-Shia groups and activists condemned last week’s verdict as well.

Human rights organizations like Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch (HRW) have also criticized Al-Nimr’s conviction.

“The death sentence against Sheikh Nimr Baqir Al-Nimr is part of a campaign by the authorities in Saudi Arabia to crush all dissent, including those defending the rights of the Kingdom’s Shia Muslim community,” said Said Boumedouha, deputy director of Amnesty International’s Middle East and North Africa Programme.

He added, “Sheikh Al-Nimr’s trial has been seriously flawed. Eyewitnesses, whose testimonies were the only evidence used against him, were not brought to court to testify.”

HRW researcher Adam Coogle also called Al-Nimr’s death sentence “political.” He told NPR that allies like the US need to address Saudi Arabia’s human rights record. He also explained that the Specialized Criminal Court in Saudi Arabia was originally formed to try terrorism cases but is now being used to silence critics.

Theoretically, the Specialized Criminal Court’s verdict is revocable. Any appeal would have to pass the Appeal Court, however, be approved by the Higher Council of Judiciary, then by the Saudi king himself, and finally by the Ministry of Interior.

This lengthy process is exactly what many Yemenis demand. While some joined last week’s protest to make their voices heard, many others chose the more subtle way of using Al-Nimr’s photo as their Facebook profile picture.

Human rights activist Mohammad Al-Wareeth, for example, expresses his resentment towards the Saudi authorities through Al-Nimr’s case. He opposes what he calls “Saudi Arabia’s killing policy,” arguing that there is no convincing reason to kill a man who did not murder anyone.

“I changed my profile photo on Facebook to the photo of Al-Nimr because I feel sympathy with him as a human, not as Shia scholar,” he said.

 

Yemen Times

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