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Chair Pundit

Why Is The Qur'an So Repetitive?

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Qur'an does not need you

You need Qur'an

Either you understand this or the whole discussion about Qur'an's lack of attractions or questionable repetitions is a waste of time.

Qur'an is a high word, coming from the Most High.

Don't expect it to be a kind of advertisement or textbook.

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Put your money where your mouth is. I refer you to post #26.

 

Money where my mouth is --> look at the numerous times the story of Moses and Abraham are told. In each instance there are different dialogues and events revealed. For example with the Moses story, Qarun is mentioned in Surah 28, the secret believer in Pharaohs court is mentioned in Surah 40 but not the others etc. Khidr (Moses' guide) is mentioned in Surah 18 but not others. The same is true for many stories and themes repeated. 

 

As for post 26 yes the statements are very similar and repeated, no one is denying there are repetitions like this, the reason for them has been expounded in this thread. The sentence "Allah is Gracious, Merciful" is also repeated tons of times. Remember the Qur'an is meant to be rhythmetic and poetic, that includes repetitions of important phrases and themes.

 

No one is forcing you to like the Qur'an or to accept it.

Edited by ChattingwithShias

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That is for the father to decide. 

 

Not  your problem or mine.

 

Qur'an does not need you

You need Qur'an

 

^ Did you guys even look at who you're debating?? Those arguments have no meaning to a non-muslim.

 

 

Shirk is mentioned many times and there is still a split within the Shia community regarding the legitimacy of praying directly to the Imams as intercessors, not to mention visiting shrines.

So that's not a strong, consistent argument for why the Qur'an had to repeat the same thing over and over to different people in differing contexts.

 

Trust me there's no split - it's only the Wahhabi-trolls on Shiachat that have an issue.  :rolleyes:
Edited by Fuan

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As for post 26 yes the statements are very similar and repeated, no one is denying there are repetitions like this, the reason for them has been expounded in this thread. The sentence "Allah is Gracious, Merciful" is also repeated tons of times. Remember the Qur'an is meant to be rhythmetic and poetic, that includes repetitions of important phrases and themes.

 

I thought you said that:

 

Of course there is repetition. Also like I said before the repetitions often have small but important differences each time.

 

Either the Qur'an repeats itself for the sake of overemphasizing, which is unnecessary and renders a large portion of the Qur'an unnecessary to read. 

Or the repetitions have subtle, important variations as you stated above. If so, please prove it.     

 

Assuming it is the former, and the response is that it rewarding for the afterlife, it begs the question why God would not simply place the same reward in a more succinct version. The repetition can sometimes, or eventually, be headache inducing, which I can verify at least for myself since I'm more than well acquainted with the Qur'an.

Trust me there's no split - it's only the Wahhabi-trolls on Shiachat pretending to be Shia's that have an issue.  :rolleyes:

 

I'll let everyone relish the irony of your comment.

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The most repeated thing in Quran is hell for disbelievers.  The Quran then instead of becoming a book primarily motivating people to believe or hold on to faith out of love of God and truth, out of moral responsibility, etc, becomes one that seeks to motivate believers to remain on faith and disbelievers to become faithful primarily through fear.

Do you consider yourself a Muslim? Because you seem to have a lot of negative views about the religion. 

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I'll let everyone relish the irony of your comment.

 

-___-;; ...those differences were because of people who had their free-will and they chose to do their crimes which created the divisions.. not the fault of the Qur'an.

Edited by Fuan

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Ok. Here's your cue.

[4:48] Allah forgiveth not that partners should be set up with Him; but He forgiveth anything else, to whom He pleaseth; to set up partners with Allah is to devise a sin most heinous indeed.

[4:116] Allah forgiveth not (the sin of) joining other gods with Him; but He forgiveth whom He pleaseth other sins than this: one who joins other gods with Allah, Hath strayed far, far away (from the right).

What's the qualitative difference? What are the essential differences in terms of their purported "deeper meanings?"

Unfortunately I am not that scholarly myself but I have heard lectures where they point out the subtle differences between ayas and what the meaning and reason for it is. I will try to link you a lecture later iA.

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Assalam Alikum Brother CP,

Thanks for opening a thread on the Quran. Alhamd'Allah at least brother you open it, read it, and want to learn more about it. Insh'Allah this thread is a sadaqa jarriya for you, because you will help others who might have the same question and you are bringing attention and interest to the Quran. Allah swt bless you. I will add my two cents of why the Quran is repetitive.

Allah swt is asking Rasoul Allah to do his duty, to give the message and remind. As human beings, 2nsan in Arabic, comes from the word nisyan which means forgetfulness. It is sometimes a blessing that we as humans forget, but sometimes there are points we need to be reminded by Allah swt.

I know in hs and college we are not encouraged to be repetitive and to condense our essays in some cases, but Quran Karem, is a compilation of law, morality, stories of our Prophets, so on and so forth for any period of time in this life. Maybe Allah swt wants to pay attention or have focus on certain aspects of the Quran like shirk for example, because it is the greatest sin in Islam and he doesn't want us to oppress ourselves and fall into this sin. Allahu a3lam.

Insh'Allah you will be able to find the answer you are looking for.

M3 Salamah, FE AMIN Allah

فَذَكِّرْ إِنَّمَا أَنْتَ مُذَكِّرٌ {21}

[shakir 88:21] Therefore do remind, for you are only a reminder.

[Pooya/Ali Commentary 88:21]

The prophet of Allah is sent to teach, preach and guide the people, but not to force people to adopt the right path.

Musaytir has been used here in the sense of an enforcer or compeller who forces or coerces in order to make any one carry out commands against one's will under duress. As has been said in Baqarah: 256, there is no compulsion in religion, so the prophet of Allah is not a compeller in this sense, otherwise as the vicegerent of Allah he has the authority to execute His divine legislative will. It is Allah who will punish the transgressors.

Aqa Mahdi Puya says:

The authority of Allah is absolute, yet all the functionaries carrying out His authority on His behalf, such as the prophets, the Imams as their successors, the angels and the spirits, are authorised by Him to execute His will.

Maybe this article, can be of use to you.

http://www.islamicinsights.com/religion/religion/forgetfulness.html

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 but sometimes there are points we need to be reminded by Allah swt.

 

Well, let's put it to the test then, shall we?: 

 

Maybe Allah swt wants to pay attention or have focus on certain aspects of the Quran like shirk for example, because it is the greatest sin in Islam and he doesn't want us to oppress ourselves and fall into this sin. Allahu a3lam.

 

Had God mentioned shirk just once, detailing its negative qualities and consequences, would we have forgotten it? How would we have forgotten it if it forms the basis of a monotheistic faith? 

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Did it not suffice for God to mention it once and move on to a different topic? Why is the same point repeated over and over again in similar and different ways in different verses? Please explain.

 

If you are a sincere learner, You need to understand the overall picture, before you get into specifics. Masters of Arabic language at the time of revelation of the Qur’an did not have the objections you, have because they understood the broader picture.

 

The first essential condition necessary for the study of the Qur'an, is the knowledge of the Arabic language.

 

The other essential condition is the knowledge of the history of Islam; since, unlike the Bible and the Torah, this book was revealed gradually during a long period of twenty-three years of the Prophet's life. It is on this account that every verse of the Qur'an is related to certain specific historical incident.

 

The Best Miracles Are Those Which Best Resemble, the Most Advanced Arts of the Time.

 

“The Imam Abu al-Hasan replied:

 

This is because when God sent Moses (peace be upon him), what prevailed among the

people of his time was magic. Thus, he brought them from God something that no one

among them could perform, and which rendered their magic null and void; and with

that He established the proof for them. And God sent Jesus (peace be upon him) at a

time when chronic illnesses had appeared and people needed the medical sciences. Jesus

brought them from God something the like of which they did not have, and by means

of which he raised them from the dead, and healed the blind and the lepers, with God's

leave. Thus, he established the proof for them.

 

And God sent Muhammad (peace be upon him and his progeny) at a time when the

art of oration and poetry was prevalent among the people of his time. Thus, he brought

them from God his exhortations and his wisdom, which rendered speeches null and

void, and he established his proof for them.5 “

(1)

 

“As for the Arabs, the were distinguished in the art of literary style and were

celebrated for the eloquence of their language. They had reached the pinnacle of literary

art, to the extent that they used to hold assemblies and gatherings to compete in

poetry and oration. A person [competing at these gatherings] was rated by the literary

excellence of what he said. Their love for poetry was so great that they selected the

seven odes, wrote them with gold water on papyrus, and hung them on the walls of

the Ka'ba. Thus, it became the practice to call a person's best poem "his gilded poem."3

Among the Arabs, both men and women were interested in literature. Al-Nabigha

al-Dhabyani was the first judge [at the contests for] poets. He used to attend the fair

of “Ukaz during its season, where a red dome of animal hide would be pitched for

him. The poets used to come to him to submit their compositions for his opinion.4

 

It was for this reason that the wisdom of God required that the Prophet of Islam should

be endowed with the miracle of the Qur'an's clarity of expression and eloquence.

Thus, the Arabs realized that this was the speech of God, and that in eloquence it is

beyond human power. This was acknowledged by all Arabs who were not obstinate.”

(2)

 

“But the Arabs reflected on the eloquence of the Qur'an and conceded its inimitability,

for they knew that they would be defeated trying to match it. Hence, some of them

believed the caller to the truth and submitted to the call of the Qur'an and attained the

honor of Islam. Others took the course of obduracy and chose to counter with swords

rather than words, and preferred a contest of lances to a contest of eloquence. This

incapacity and opposition were the ample proof that the Qur'an was a divine

revelation beyond human capacity”

(3)

 

(1): Page 44

(2): Page 43

(3): Page 45

 

http://althaqalayn.files.wordpress.com/2014/02/al-bayan-ayatullah-khui.pdf

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Thus, the Arabs realized that this was the speech of God, and that in eloquence it is beyond human power

 

How? Expound as to how any verse is beyond the ability of a human being to create, and how exactly does it transcend an achievable criteria? Give me a specific example.

 

Imamat is mentioned a few times in subtle manner, and look at what happened.

 

Not it isn't. The concept of the 12 Imams in the Qur'an is entirely ambiguous, and not obvious in the verses at all. In fact, it is the ahadith which provided the names of the Imams, not the Qur'an.

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 becomes one that seeks to motivate believers to remain on faith and disbelievers to become faithful primarily through fear.

 

Remember that the muslims were persecuted by these people. Try to see the Quran from that perspective. It is likely that these verses were revealed to reassure the muslims that their oppressors will be punished. 

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It is likely that these verses were revealed to reassure the muslims that their oppressors will be punished.

That's fine, but why waste precious space to reiterate the "evil abode of the disbelievers?" How is that useful?

Moreover, if what you say is true, namely that the disbelievers which the verses were referring to were only those who persecuted the Muslims, why is the constantly repeated punishment of the disbelievers applied to modern day atheists and agnostics who are peaceful?

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fear and hope 

both of them are needed

a religion of hope only, is a corrupt religion.

 

don't worry so much about how God is exclusive and he could be more inclusive, that's his job, he knows better what to do.

instead, mind you own business and see which side you wanna take. 


God is God and human is human, believe this.

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How? Expound as to how any verse is beyond the ability of a human being to create, and how exactly does it transcend an achievable criteria? Give me a specific example.

 

 

 

"To begin with; the Arabic language and Arab speech are divided into two branches.

 

One of them is rhymed poetry. It is a speech with metre and rhyme, which means every line of it ends upon a definite letter, which is called the 'rhyme'. This rhymed poetry is again divided into metres or what is called as al-Bihar, literally meaning 'The Seas'. This is so called because of the way the poetry moves according to the rhythmic patterns. There are sixteen al-Bihar viz; at-Tawil, al-Bassit, al-Wafir, al-Kamil, ar-Rajs, al-Khafif, al-Hazaj, al-Muttakarib, al-Munsarih, al-Muktatab, al-Muktadarak, al-Madid, al-Mujtath, al-Ramel, al-Khabab and as-Saria'. Each one rhymes differently. For metres of Arabic poetry please see please see Lyall's book Translations Of Ancient Arabian Poetry, Chiefly Pre-Islamic.[1] He discusses al-Kamil, al-Wafir, al-Hajaz, at-Tawil, al-Bassit, al-Khafif and al-Madid briefly.[2]

 

 

The other branch of Arabic speech is prose, that is non-metrical speech. The prose may be a rhymed prose. Rhymed prose consists of cola ending on the same rhyme throughout, or of sentences rhymed in pairs. This is called "rhymed prose" or sajc. Prose may also be straight prose (mursal). In straight prose, the speech goes on and is not divided in cola, but is continued straight through without any divisions, either of rhyme or of anything else. Prose is employed in sermons and prayers and in speeches intended to encourage or frighten the masses.[3] One of the most famous speeches involving sajc is that of Hajjaj bin Yusuf in his first deputation in Iraq in post-Islamic and Quss bin Sa'idah in pre-Islamic times.

 

So, the challenge, as cAbdur Rahim Green mentions, is to produce in Arabic , three lines, that do not fall into one of these sixteen al-Bihar, that is not rhyming prose, nor like the speech of soothsayers, and not normal speech, that it should contain at least a comprehensible meaning and rhetoric, i.e. not gobbledygook. Indeed

 

It is interesting to know that all the pre-Islam and post-Islamic poetry collected by Louis Cheikho falls in the above sixteen metres or al-Bihar.[5] Indeed the pagans of Mecca repeated accuse Prophet Muhammad(P) for being a forger, a soothsayer etc. The Arabs who were at the pinnacle of their poetry and prose during the time of revelation of the Qur'an could not even produce the smallest surah of its like. The Qur'an's form did not fit into any of the above mentioned categories. It was this that made the Qur'an inimitable, and left the pagan Arabs at a loss as to how they might combat it as Alqama bin cAbd al-Manaf confirmed when he addressed their leaders, the Quraysh:

 

 

The Qur'an is not verse, but it is rhythmic. The rhythm of some verses resemble the regularity of sajc, and both are rhymed, while some verses have a similarity to Rajaz in its vigour and rapidity.

 But it was recognized by Quraysh critics to belong to neither one nor the other category.[4]

 

 

Oh Quraish, a new calamity has befallen you. Mohammed was a young man the most liked among you, most truthful in speech, and most trustworthy, until, when you saw gray hairs on his temple, and he brought you his message, you said that he was a sorcerer, but he is not, for we seen such people and their spitting and their knots; you said, a diviner, but we have seen such people and their behavior, and we have heard their rhymes; you said a soothsayer, but he is not a soothsayer, for we have heard their rhymes; and you said a poet, but he is not a poet, for we have heard all kinds of poetry; you said he was possessed, but he is not for we have seen the possessed, and he shows no signs of their gasping and whispering and delirium. Oh men of Quraish, look to your affairs, for by Allah a serious thing has befallen you.

 

What Do The Orientalists Say About The Inimitability Of The Qur'an?

 

E H Palmer, as early as 1880, recognized the unique style of the Qur'an. But he seem to have been wavering between two thoughts. He writes in the Introduction to his translation of the Qur'an:

 

The famous Arabist from University of Oxford, Hamilton Gibb was open upon about the style of the Qur'an. In his words:

 

That the best of Arab writers has never succeeded in producing anything equal in merit to the Qur'an itself is not surprising. In the first place, they have agreed before-hand that it is unapproachable, and they have adopted its style as the perfect standard; any deviation from it therefore must of necessity be a defect. Again, with them this style is not spontaneous as with Muhammad and his contemporaries, but is as artificial as though Englishmen should still continue to follow Chaucer as their model, in spite of the changes which their language has undergone. With the Prophet, the style was natural, and the words were those in every-day ordinary life, while with the later Arabic authors the style is imitative and the ancient words are introduced as a literary embellishment. The natural consequence is that their attempts look laboured and unreal by the side of his impromptu and forcible eloquence.[7]

 

And in some other place, talking about the Prophet(P) and the Qur'an, he states:

 

...the Meccans still demanded of him a miracle, and with remarkable boldness and self confidence Mohammad appealed as a supreme confirmation of his mission to the Koran itself. Like all Arabs they were the connoisseurs of language and rhetoric. Well, then if the Koran were his own composition other men could rival it. Let them produce ten verses like it. If they could not (and it is obvious that they could not), then let them accept the Koran as an outstanding evident miracle.[8]

 

On the influence of the Qur'an on Arabic literature Gibb says:

 

Though, to be sure, the question of the literary merit is one not to be judged on a priori grounds but in relation to the genius of Arabic language; and no man in fifteen hundred years has ever played on that deep-toned instrument with such power, such boldness, and such range of emotional effect as Mohammad did.[9]

 

As a literary monument the Koran thus stands by itself, a production unique to the Arabic literature, having neither forerunners nor successors in its own idiom. Muslims of all ages are united in proclaiming the inimitability not only of its contents but also of its style..... and in forcing the High Arabic idiom into the expression of new ranges of thought the Koran develops a bold and strikingly effective rhetorical prose in which all the resources of syntactical modulation are exploited with great freedom and originality.[10]

 

As the Qur'an itself says

 

The influence of the Koran on the development of Arabic Literature has been incalculable, and exerted in many directions. Its ideas, its language, its rhymes pervade all subsequent literary works in greater or lesser measure. Its specific linguistic features were not emulated, either in the chancery prose of the next century or in the later prose writings, but it was at least partly due to the flexibility imparted by the Koran to the High Arabic idiom that the former could be so rapidly developed and adjusted to the new needs of the imperial government and an expanding society.[11]

 

Lastly, the beautiful style of the Qur'an is admired even by the Arab Christians:

 

And if ye are in doubt as to what We have revealed from time to time to Our servant, then produce a Sura like thereunto; and call your witnesses or helpers (If there are any) besides Allah, if your (doubts) are true. But if ye cannot- and of a surety ye cannot- then fear the Fire whose fuel is men and stones,- which is prepared for those who reject Faith. (Qur'an 2:23-24)

 

The above sentences speak of themselves. Summing up: Within the Arabic literature, either poetry or prose, there is nothing comparable to the Qur'an. Muslims throughout the centuries are united upon the its inimitability.

 

 

The Quran is one of the world's classics which cannot be translated without grave loss. It has a rhythm of peculiar beauty and a cadence that charms the ear. Many Christian Arabs speak of its style with warm admiration, and most Arabists acknowledge its excellence. When it is read aloud or recited it has an almost hypnotic effect that makes the listener indifferent to its sometimes strange syntax and its sometimes, to us, repellent content. It is this quality it possesses of silencing criticism by the sweet music of its language that has given birth to the dogma of its inimitability; indeed it may be affirmed that within the literature of the Arabs, wide and fecund as it is both in poetry and in elevated prose, there is nothing to compare with it.[12]

 

http://www.islamic-awareness.org/Quran/Miracle/ijaz.html

Edited by S.M.H.A.

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So, the challenge, as cAbdur Rahim Green mentions, is to produce in Arabic , three lines, that do not fall into one of these sixteen al-Bihar, that is not rhyming prose, nor like the speech of soothsayers, and not normal speech, that it should contain at least a comprehensible meaning and rhetoric, i.e. not gobbledygook.

This challenge is "gobbledygook." Why can't you present to me a specific set of "three lines" from the Qur'an and explain how they surpass the obscure and obfuscating criteria?

I don't want to derail this thread, but this is important.

Anyway, it is clear that no one has been able to explain why the two verses I quoted above are identical in content, and almost identical in structure.

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That's fine, but why waste precious space to reiterate the "evil abode of the disbelievers?" How is that useful?

Moreover, if what you say is true, namely that the disbelievers which the verses were referring to were only those who persecuted the Muslims, why is the constantly repeated punishment of the disbelievers applied to modern day atheists and agnostics who are peaceful?

Why are your questions so repetitive in this thread?

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This challenge is "gobbledygook." Why can't you present to me a specific set of "three lines" from the Qur'an and explain how they surpass the obscure and obfuscating criteria?

I don't want to derail this thread, but this is important.

Anyway, it is clear that no one has been able to explain why the two verses I quoted above are identical in content, and almost identical in structure.

There were other criteria for the Qur'an than content, such as the poetic considerations that have been mentioned. Additionally, if things are repeated then that obviously indicates that a certain amount of importance is attached to it.

By the way, I'm going to give you the benefit of the doubt, and assume you weren't calling the Qur'an's challenge "gobbledygook". Any blasphemy, and you will be banned.

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By the way, I'm going to give you the benefit of the doubt, and assume you weren't calling the Qur'an's challenge "gobbledygook". Any blasphemy, and you will be banned.

Would that really be blasphemy? I don't think he tried to insult the Quran, he just thinks it's challenge is weak? I guess? It's like we can't ban atheists for believing in no God. Hopefully I am not being incompetent to his words being used. Correct me if I'm wrong.

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Additionally, if things are repeated then that obviously indicates that a certain amount of importance is attached to it.

Prophet Musa has been mentioned many more times than Prophet Muhammad.

Ramadhan has only been mentioned once.

By the way, I'm going to give you the benefit of the doubt, and assume you weren't calling the Qur'an's challenge "gobbledygook". Any blasphemy, and you will be banned.

?????

I am saying that the alleged criteria doesn't make sense, which is why I asked for a specific example from any verse of the Qur'an.

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وَقَالَ الَّذِينَ كَفَرُوا لَوْلَا نُزِّلَ عَلَيْهِ الْقُرْآنُ جُمْلَةً وَاحِدَةً ۚ كَذَٰلِكَ لِنُثَبِّتَ بِهِ فُؤَادَكَ ۖ وَرَتَّلْنَاهُ تَرْتِيلًا

And those who disbelieve say: Why is the Qur'an not revealed unto him all at once? (It is revealed) thus that We may strengthen thy heart therewith; and We have arranged it in right order.xxv32

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Moreover, if what you say is true, namely that the disbelievers which the verses were referring to were only those who persecuted the Muslims, why is the constantly repeated punishment of the disbelievers applied to modern day atheists and agnostics who are peaceful?

 

Muhammad Ali, 

 

This question was aimed at you. It's interesting the tactic that you use to avoid answering difficult questions is the same every time: "I'm not going to answer because you won't agree." 

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Muhammad Ali, 

 

This question was aimed at you. It's interesting the tactic that you use to avoid answering difficult questions is the same every time: "I'm not going to answer because you won't agree." 

 

I can respond, but I chose not to.

 

why is the constantly repeated punishment of the disbelievers applied to modern day atheists and agnostics who are peaceful?

 

I don't believe that. See the other thread.

Edited by Muhammed Ali

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That is a reasonable point of view. However, let's be honest here. How many times do we have to be warned about shirk, for example? If it were not for the beauty of the recitation, this would be a one-time read for me to be frank. Could not God have elaborated in more depth on the types of shirk that extend beyond mere carved out idols? To repeat "avoid shirk or you'll be punished severely" so much throughout the text is a tedious read, no?

 

I remember once reading through the Quran, and, in this particular read through, i told myself id skip 5 verses every time i ran across a verse that related to shirk or punishment.  Let me tell ya, it was probably about a half hour read.  No exaggeration.

 

Someone commented "The Qur'an was intentionally revealed in a poetic rhythmetic way because the trend at time among the Arabs was poetry and poetry competitions."

 

The Bible too was "revealed" in particular ways relating to people of that time. The message of the OT is much different from that of the NT. As if Gods personality transformed over time, with relation to historical events.

 

Now, you would think that one true message, literally, straight from God would be unalterable and distinct and divinly unique.  Yet what we find are these words coming in various forms.  Almost as if...this message has been manipulated by people of their particular time. Whether the scripture comes off as aggressive, or peaceful...or even poetic.

 

Chatting with shias: "Also it is more enjoyable for future generations to read, recite, and listen to. The Bible on the other hand is long boring and drawn out, now that is a burden to read."

 

This person must have forgotten that the Bible is a work of God as well with original scripture existing to this very day haha.

Edited by iCambrian

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(bismillah)

(salam)

 

Because it is necessary to have such verses. Even though they are same verses but their deep meaning might be different. Allah (SWT) knows best how Holy Quran should be constructed for us to understand. Remember that Holy Quran that we possess is the version that we are able to understand. Allah (SWT) knows best what is best for us!

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I remember once reading through the Quran, and, in this particular read through, i told myself id skip 5 verses every time i ran across a verse that related to shirk or punishment.  Let me tell ya, it was probably about a half hour read.  No exaggeration.

 

Someone commented "The Qur'an was intentionally revealed in a poetic rhythmetic way because the trend at time among the Arabs was poetry and poetry competitions."

 

The Bible too was "revealed" in particular ways relating to people of that time. The message of the OT is much different from that of the NT. As if Gods personality transformed over time, with relation to historical events.

 

Now, you would think that one true message, literally, straight from God would be unalterable and distinct and divinly unique.  Yet what we find are these words coming in various forms.  Almost as if...this message has been manipulated by people of their particular time. Whether the scripture comes off as aggressive, or peaceful...or even poetic.

Can there be peace without justice? Can there be justice with unrestrained aggression? Can aggression be defeated with wishful thinking?

Why dose the existence of laws in a religious book be discouraging? Why would the talk against atheism and polytheism in the book of monotheism be a surprise?

It is the most beautiful thing about Quran. It says : I am your lord. Nothing is like me, so don't try to draw resemblance between me and my creation. I am your lord, merciful by being just and just.

Sometimes, the same sentence carry different meaning when told in different context which is why the Quran is rich book and mathani ie multi folded meanings in a sentence .

Take the word samad in the chapter of ikhlas. Samad means the simple, non complex not made of parts. Samad also means the one sought for needs fulfillment .

Say Allah is Ahad (not numbered, not counted , unique ). Allah is samad.

These 2 verses summarize the tawheeed. He is one and alone in his nature, he is one and alone in his relation to you.

He begets not, nor he is begotten

This verse is an emphasis on the first 2 verses. Although some may get it from the first 2, other people really need it to be written down to them . Allah is Samad which means that he is sought for help. He is ahad, means he has no resemblance to his creation. He dose not need an originator nor a predecessor nor a son to survive.

Nor there is to him any equivalence .

Again, this verse is explaining the first 2 verses. He is the one sought for help, no one is independent from him, not even an equally independent god.

Now, let's try a similar word being repeated a number of times but the meaning will differ. Surat alnas. The word nãs means people, the general human population of earth , both the believers and disbelievers .

So it says : I seek refuge in the rab of nas. Rab means the one who takes care of . The father is called rab of family. The boss is called rab of the work.

I seek refuge in the Malik of nas. Malik means king or owner. The one who owns and one who has exclusive right to manage .

I seek refuge in the ilah of nas. Ilah means diety. The one who is worshipped.

So why the repetition of the word nas? Couldn't Quran just said I seek refuge in the rab of nas and their king and diety?

This is called balagha which is the ability to mount more than literal meaning on words without loosing brevity nor accuracy .

The sura is a prayer for protection.

The one who takes care of every human, will take care of me.

The one who has might and power over every human who seek to hurt me or help me, will protect me.

The one who a god for every human wither they acknowledge it or not, will protect me.

And those who worship God are more worthy of his protection than those who don't .

Everything you say humans, you think of different sort of people, but same lord.

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Can there be peace without justice? Can there be justice with unrestrained aggression? Can aggression be defeated with wishful thinking?

Why dose the existence of laws in a religious book be discouraging? Why would the talk against atheism and polytheism in the book of monotheism be a surprise?

It is the most beautiful thing about Quran. It says : I am your lord. Nothing is like me, so don't try to draw resemblance between me and my creation. I am your lord, merciful by being just and just.

Sometimes, the same sentence carry different meaning when told in different context which is why the Quran is rich book and mathani ie multi folded meanings in a sentence .

Take the word samad in the chapter of ikhlas. Samad means the simple, non complex not made of parts. Samad also means the one sought for needs fulfillment .

Say Allah is Ahad (not numbered, not counted , unique ). Allah is samad.

These 2 verses summarize the tawheeed. He is one and alone in his nature, he is one and alone in his relation to you.

He begets not, nor he is begotten

This verse is an emphasis on the first 2 verses. Although some may get it from the first 2, other people really need it to be written down to them . Allah is Samad which means that he is sought for help. He is ahad, means he has no resemblance to his creation. He dose not need an originator nor a predecessor nor a son to survive.

Nor there is to him any equivalence .

Again, this verse is explaining the first 2 verses. He is the one sought for help, no one is independent from him, not even an equally independent god.

Now, let's try a similar word being repeated a number of times but the meaning will differ. Surat alnas. The word nãs means people, the general human population of earth , both the believers and disbelievers .

So it says : I seek refuge in the rab of nas. Rab means the one who takes care of . The father is called rab of family. The boss is called rab of the work.

I seek refuge in the Malik of nas. Malik means king or owner. The one who owns and one who has exclusive right to manage .

I seek refuge in the ilah of nas. Ilah means diety. The one who is worshipped.

So why the repetition of the word nas? Couldn't Quran just said I seek refuge in the rab of nas and their king and diety?

This is called balagha which is the ability to mount more than literal meaning on words without loosing brevity nor accuracy .

The sura is a prayer for protection.

The one who takes care of every human, will take care of me.

The one who has might and power over every human who seek to hurt me or help me, will protect me.

The one who a god for every human wither they acknowledge it or not, will protect me.

And those who worship God are more worthy of his protection than those who don't .

Everything you say humans, you think of different sort of people, but same lord.

 

Your words would have more value to someone elses ears im afraid.  But thank you.

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Chaotic Muslim,

 

[4:48]Allah forgiveth not that partners should be set up with Him; but He forgiveth anything else, to whom He pleasethto set up partners with Allah is to devise a sin most heinous indeed.

 

[4:116]Allah forgiveth not (the sin of) joining other gods with Him; but He forgiveth whom He pleaseth other sins than this: one who joins other gods with Allah, Hath strayed far, far away (from the right). 

 

Spot the difference.

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There's a fine line between fruitful reminding and needless repetition.

The irony is that you do not know what that fine line is since you yourself don't seem to be taking heed of the reminder. The irony is that you need the reminder the most. Edited by eThErEaL

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