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In the Name of God بسم الله

What Is The Most Beautiful Sounding Language

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Arabic - When spoken by someone who doesn't sound like they are trying to cough up a porcupine  Farsi - Mainly because it is a language that you can thoroughly express yourself in. Which is also the r

While we are at it, here is the list of the 3 most ugly languages i know of:   1. Vietnamese - I seriously want to choke someone when i hear someone speak this language 2. German - Although a strong l

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While we are at it, here is the list of the 3 most ugly languages i know of:

 

1. Vietnamese - I seriously want to choke someone when i hear someone speak this language

2. German - Although a strong language, it just sounds annoying to me. And i was forced to have it at school which has made me dislike it. 

3. Turkish - Not sure why, but all the guzul muzul chuzul makes me upset and ruins my day. 

 

Lol, don't know about Vietnamese but I share your sentiments about the other two.

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Most beautiful sounding language is French - soft melodious and soothing; and the most disharmonic group of sounds is Cantonese. I have to listen to it on the bus every day - twice - it sounds like a bunch of cats fighting while making long scratching noises on a chalkboard - it has the ability to penetrate my QC15's - thinking of writing Bose ....... 

 

I will agree with Vietnamese as well - doesn't quite have the same ear piercing ability though - but is definitely up there.

Edited by Maryaam
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Most beautiful sounding language is French - soft melodious and soothing;

 

French sounds like people are throwing up their frog leg lunch.

 

Except for when Thierry Henry speaks it. Then it's super-cool.

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Arabic generally sounds bad, quranic recitation etc can be really nice though.

 

Farsi sounds really nice, especially on women, even the harshest most aggressive women speaking farsi can seem harmless, although it is a bit too feminine sounding on men.  

 

Japanese sounds pretty epic, very masculine.

 

German sounds epic too.

 

Punjabi can be hilarious, and it can seem a bit harsh sometimes.

 

Urdu seems to be a mix, not too feminine or masculine, urdu singers sound awesome, it is a poetic language too like farsi and arabic.  It does however lack that raw masculinity found in other languages.

 

Spanish sounds cool, very relate-able and emotionally expressive.

 

Chinese, Cantonese or whatever variant isn't pleasant to listen to.

 

Alot of African languages sound cool but I couldn't tell what they were.

Edited by King
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ChattingwithShia's Guide to Languages -

 

Arabic is beautiful when recited and sung, because it's rhythmic, but very unpleasant to hear when it is spoken in normal conversation. Especially Lebanese Arabic. ("Salaaaaam I'm from lebnaaaaaaan"). Also Arabs naturally speak loudly.

 

Farsi is nice poetic language but Persian-speaking people sometimes don't have nice voices.

 

Nothing, and I mean nothing, is uglier than Arabic spoken with a Farsi accent. When Iranians try to do Arabic and especially when they attempt to make the same voice and sounds of Arabs while pronouncing the words, they fail so badly it's actually painful to my ears.

 

Turkish is a silly language to me. "Lar-larlar-lar-lar"

 

Hebrew and Vietnamese are ugly languages. Probably the worst two actually.

 

French is very overrated in my opinion because it has no hard sounds. It sounds like the person is just perpetually on the verge of throwing up.

 

Languages I like - Spanish, English (esp in Australian accent), Urdu, Russian, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, German, Persian

 

I'm not familiar with many African languages, but Black people generally have good strong voices.

Edited by ChattingwithShias
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Language I don't like:

Indian/Urdu etc.

I agree. I grew up listening to it and it just sounds so ... I don't really know how to explain it. It sounds like a chicken running around with his head chopped off if that makes any sense lol. My father would kill me if he heard me say such a thing. But it's his fault I never actually learned it :dry:
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The way Spaniards speak Spanish is awful, and really difficult on the ears, I agree though, that the way certain South Americans, such as Argentinians speak it, is quite nice - In the same way as the way the Portuguese spoken in Brazil is very melodic, but in Portugal is absolutely horrible.

 

Though all in all, it can often depend on who is doing the speaking, with French for example, I'm sure many people would be shocked to hear some of the variations of it, particularly the type spoken by the Arab youth, soft, melodious and soothing, it is not (if it was limited to the boys, that would be one thing, but the girls are just as bad, if not worse)

Edited by Ali_Hussain
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Favourite languages and dialects(Not in order):

1) Arabic Fusha (Quran recitation, ahadith and poetry)

2) Arabic(Kuwaiti)

3) Arabic(Lebanese)

4) French( Paris French, not Montreal French)

5) English(British accent....American/Canadian, Irish, Scottish and Aussie are not the best)

6) Urdu(poetry is nice to listen to)

8) Hebrew

9) Farsi

Edited by Al-Najashi
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I recently watched an Israeli film in which people spoke Hebrew and Arabic, and I couldn't distinguish the two. They sounded so similar.

Thats great,am sure the palestine's well be more then delighted to read this.

Theirs a massive difference,and am not sure if they even made the arabic speakers speak arabic. Yes,their are films where they just speak any random/ made up words,and make it seem like its arabic,this is what I have seen americans do,they only know yallah...

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Thats great,am sure the palestine's well be more then delighted to read this.

Theirs a massive difference,and am not sure if they even made the arabic speakers speak arabic. Yes,their are films where they just speak any random/ made up words,and make it seem like its arabic,this is what I have seen americans do,they only know yallah...

He is to most extent correct. Maybe Arab speakers like me and you can easily differentiate between Arabic Hebrew, but non-Arabic ones have a hard time distinguishing the two as they both sound alike and I noticed that with some of them.

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He is to most extent correct. Maybe Arab speakers like me and you can easily differentiate between Arabic Hebrew, but non-Arabic ones have a hard time distinguishing the two as they both sound alike and I noticed that with some of them.

That is a possiability,however you would think that muslims would pick up a word or two when arabs speak,because they read surat and same words in those ayat are used by most arabs.

But each to their own opinion.

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That is a possiability,however you would think that muslims would pick up a word or two when arabs speak,because they read surat and same words in those ayat are used by most arabs.

But each to their own opinion.

 

Yes, you are right.

 

When some of the words, terms and phrases used in the Quran are spoken by Arabic speakers in daily life, they are easy to spot. Various Arabic dialects as spoken today are also easy to spot if not put against a similar-sounding language.

 

That's why to a non-trained set of non-Arab ears, Hebrew and Arabic as spoken in Palestine sound very similar because they are phonetically so close.

 

am not sure if they even made the arabic speakers speak arabic. Yes,their are films where they just speak any random/ made up words,and make it seem like its arabic,this is what I have seen americans do,they only know yallah...

 

No, it was Arab actors with proper Arabic as spoken in Palestine.

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Farsi sounds really nice, especially on women, even the harshest most aggressive women speaking farsi can seem harmless, although it is a bit too feminine sounding on men. 

 

I can't stand it when people say this, because this is the farthest thing from the truth.

 

First of all, I can't stand the artificially "feminine" voice used by all these soosooli Iranian women. It sounds like a guy doing a parody of a female voice. Anyone who finds that appealing is mentally insane. (I am not talking about normal-talking Iranian women)

 

As for it sounding effeminate on men, it all boils down to the speaker. I know that Seyyed Ali Khamenei don't speak like no effeminate man, that's for sure.

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In my opinion, considering the accent and pronunciations, Farsi is the best and the most fluent one. But the easiest one to learn is English. French and many other languages have some strange and unusual or difficult sounds which I consider a deficiency. French also lacks the sound "r".Arabic and Hebrew are very similar (they have the same origin, I suppose). Also Arabic lacks some sounds like "ch", "p", ... .

 

Chinese and some eastern languages are tonic which make them difficult.

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Also Arabic lacks some sounds like "ch", "p", ... .

 

And 'g' as in 'game', hard 'd', hard 't',

 

Such a great language and so poor in consonants.

 

Is this also true that native Arabic speakers have a hard time learning English because Arabic is a Semitic language and as such has very different phonology than those who natively speak Indo-European languages like Farsi and Urdu?

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What are hard t and hard d?

 

Are you asking that question from me, Marbles?

 

'T' as in 'tiger' and 'd' as in 'dog'. Arabs spoke both in soft consonants which don't exactly exist in English, ie; ت and د

 

I asked in general, anyone may answer.

Edited by Marbles
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I can't stand it when people say this, because this is the farthest thing from the truth.

 

First of all, I can't stand the artificially "feminine" voice used by all these soosooli Iranian women. It sounds like a guy doing a parody of a female voice. Anyone who finds that appealing is mentally insane. (I am not talking about normal-talking Iranian women)

 

As for it sounding effeminate on men, it all boils down to the speaker. I know that Seyyed Ali Khamenei don't speak like no effeminate man, that's for sure.

 

Meh, sure some Iranian men wouldn't sound feminine while speaking farsi, but if you compare it to other languages, it seems softer and a bit more feminine.  This is my experience anyway, half the Iranian women here, as soon as they start conversing in farsi, it just sounds a lot softer and less annoying than english let alone arabic.  The same goes for Iranian men here, they start sounding quite expressive and gentle.

Edited by King
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Korean, hands down. I love the way it sounds, it's so pleasant. I'm not a fan of country accents, though.

Sometimes Urdu sounds very nice, especially when it comes to poetry, but I think the hard d's and t's sound weird.

I like Ukrainian as well. One of my friends is from Ukraine and she has a sort of deep voice so whenever she talks to her parents in her native language it's fun to listen to.

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Language I don't like:

 

Indian/Urdu etc.

 

How can one possibly not like it?

 

Indian actor Naseeruddin Shah recites Faiz's legendary poem. There's nothing more beautiful than Urdu poetry!

What about ط and ض?

 

What about them? :donno:

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You said that Arabic doesn't have a hard T or hard D. I provided them to you.

 

Nope, those two alphabets don't correspond to hard T and hard D.

 

Ask an Arab to pronounce 'tiger', 'dandy', 'football', 'true' and you see them using ت for T and د for D.

 

 

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